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Filefish Photo forgettable


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#1 Skeptic14

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 10:22 AM

Planhead Filefish

Destin, FL

TG-4, UWL-04, YS-03, YS-D2

light amount of post-processing (color correction and cropping)

 

During the dive I felt I nailed the shot when I took it; the filefish gave a decent angle as I was slowly moving into position.  When I first reviewed I was pretty excited, it was sharp, clear and had good color.  But quickly, other shots from the day usurped it as more memorable or interesting. 

 

It could be too closely cropped with too dark a background, not a dramatic enough upward angle, or perhaps just the scenery and subject are themselves forgettable.  It just doesn't seem to go beyond a good "fish id" shot.  All comments and feedback welcome.

 

Thanks

 

35528553680_db6db3e148_z.jpg



#2 Tom_Kline

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 01:51 PM

Using a single strobe on the right side might have helped. Or at least turning down the output of the left strobe by quite a bit. This would have darkened the left side of the pic as well as possibly enabling a shadow to be cast onto the background reef helping to isolate the fish from it.


Thomas C. Kline, Jr., Ph. D.
Oceanography & Limnology
Currently used housed digital cameras: Canon EOS-1Ds MkIII, EOS-1D MkIV, and EOS-1DX; and Nikon D3X. More or less retired: Canon EOS-1Ds MkII; and Nikon D1X, D2X, and D2H.

Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 200mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 60D, 150D, and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.

http://www.salmonography.com/

 


#3 Skeptic14

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 09:15 AM

Thanks for the suggestion; I will look for an opportunity to try that technique next dive.  Is varying output of the two strobes a good way generally for creating more depth in photos?


Edited by Skeptic14, 15 July 2017 - 09:16 AM.


#4 Tom_Kline

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 12:09 PM

It depends on the circumstances. You need to quickly analyze the situation and adjust the lighting accordingly. One way to quickly (maybe faster than turning a tiny knob on the flash) reduce a strobe's output is to turn it. Tilting the left strobe up could have done this. Chimping can help with the learning curve.


Thomas C. Kline, Jr., Ph. D.
Oceanography & Limnology
Currently used housed digital cameras: Canon EOS-1Ds MkIII, EOS-1D MkIV, and EOS-1DX; and Nikon D3X. More or less retired: Canon EOS-1Ds MkII; and Nikon D1X, D2X, and D2H.

Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 200mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 60D, 150D, and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.

http://www.salmonography.com/

 


#5 Skeptic14

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 01:08 PM

That's what I was thinking, pulling a strobe back and pointing it out would be much quicker; thanks for the tip.