Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Sigma 10-20mm F3.5 vs F4-5.6


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 jefdriesen

jefdriesen

    Lionfish

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 70 posts

Posted 16 May 2018 - 04:59 AM

Does the newer F3.5 version of this lens have any advantages over the older F4-5.6 version?


Nikon D7000 - Nikon AF-D 60mm - Tokina 10-17mm - Hugyfot housing - 2x Sea & Sea YS-110 optically triggered

#2 Cerianthus

Cerianthus

    Great Hammerhead

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 819 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hasselt, Overijssel, Netherlands

Posted 16 May 2018 - 10:48 AM

From the specs slighty faster and the same aperture at all focal lengths.

Gerard

My photo's on flickr
Crop the world ! (Using Canon 70D, 60mm, 100mm, 10-17mm FE, Ikelite)


#3 jefdriesen

jefdriesen

    Lionfish

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 70 posts

Posted 17 May 2018 - 04:35 AM

Yes, but the question is do you notice the difference in practice? And if the answer is yes, is it worth the extra money or not? I'm considering buying one of these lenses, but I'm not really sure which one I should get.


Nikon D7000 - Nikon AF-D 60mm - Tokina 10-17mm - Hugyfot housing - 2x Sea & Sea YS-110 optically triggered

#4 Grantjpthomas

Grantjpthomas

    Lionfish

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland / Malaysia
  • Interests:Scuba diving, Free diving, Travelling, Conservation and Capturing it all on camera!

Posted 17 May 2018 - 03:11 PM

I used to own the Sigma 10-20mm f3.5 version. If you are going to shoot in low light or night photography then the f3.5 is handy as you can hold the aperture open through the whole focal range length range. If you are using it in an underwater housing be aware that the f3.5 version is slightly larger than the f4-6.5 version. 


Grant Thomas

(PADI instructor on Tioman Island, Malaysia)

Personal webpage www.facebook.com/GrantThomasPhotos


#5 tubestance

tubestance

    Lionfish

  • Industry
  • PipPip
  • 52 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Playa Del Rey, California

Posted 19 May 2018 - 07:24 AM

I'd go with the older f/4-5.6 version for underwater. Save cash, it's smaller and lighter (like Grant said), and you'll likely not use it wide open (at f/3.5) underwater. But, if starscapes and indoor shooting interest you, then consider the f/3.5.