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Freshwater insect larva?


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#1 benedika

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Posted 19 July 2018 - 09:32 AM

Hi,
what is this or what is it going to transform?
I have found this, about 5mm small critter, on a river dive in Switzerland. on the next day i have found another one twice as big.
The pic is a screenshot from a video i took from the 5mm one.
the critter in action: 
 
 
or here
 
 
Alex

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#2 ComeFromAway

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 05:12 PM

That is stunning footage! What a site!

 

What equipment were you using? Did you do two dives, one focusing on wide-angle and another on macro?

 

My first thought is that the critter you're asking about is the larva of a mayfly from the family Heptageniidae. They are built like Arnold Schwarzenegger in his prime with a big broad body and legs. They are usually fairly flat as well; as such you often find them in faster-flowing water where their flat bodies perform well in high current.



#3 benedika

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 02:26 PM

That is stunning footage! What a site!
 
What equipment were you using? Did you do two dives, one focusing on wide-angle and another on macro?
 
My first thought is that the critter you're asking about is the larva of a mayfly from the family Heptageniidae. They are built like Arnold Schwarzenegger in his prime with a big broad body and legs. They are usually fairly flat as well; as such you often find them in faster-flowing water where their flat bodies perform well in high current.

Thank you!
All the gear i used is at the end of the video.
You are right, its a flathead mayfly.
I did two WA with fisheye and one macro dive.
The next time i will concentrate more one macro.
The "fly" at the end is a water bug

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