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New rig feedback requested.


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#1 conchyjoe

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:08 AM

Rig:
OM-D EM-5
PT-EO8
8mm Pana
Zen 100mm Dome
Dual Inon Z240-2

I have never shot WA like this so I am very green.

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Olympus OM-D EM-5 - PT-E08 - 8mm Panasonic - Zen 100mm Dome Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Olympus E-620 - PT-E06 - 50mm Zuiko - Athena 50mm Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Learned a LOT from folks on the internet, Thanks!

#2 DiverPam

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 01:34 PM

What are your settings for this shot?

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#3 conchyjoe

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 02:07 PM

Oops, sorry forgot that.

F/11, 1/250, ISO200, center weighted
Olympus OM-D EM-5 - PT-E08 - 8mm Panasonic - Zen 100mm Dome Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Olympus E-620 - PT-E06 - 50mm Zuiko - Athena 50mm Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Learned a LOT from folks on the internet, Thanks!

#4 KirkD

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 02:43 PM

What king of "rig feedback" are youmpooking for. Or are you wanting feedback on the picture?
Kirk

#5 conchyjoe

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:04 PM

Yes the picture. I was merely stating the rig is band new rig and I had never shot WA.
Olympus OM-D EM-5 - PT-E08 - 8mm Panasonic - Zen 100mm Dome Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Olympus E-620 - PT-E06 - 50mm Zuiko - Athena 50mm Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Learned a LOT from folks on the internet, Thanks!

#6 KirkD

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:12 PM

Looks underexposed. I would also get closer or simply crop this image. Also, point the strobes more outwards to avoid the backscatter.

#7 conchyjoe

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:21 PM

Looks underexposed. I would also get closer or simply crop this image. Also, point the strobes more outwards to avoid the backscatter.


I always think overexposed because I am drawn to the light, and that is at the bottom where there is nothing! Posted Image but sand anyway.

So move the strobes further out, point them more outwards, and maybe position them a little higher? Or at least pointed more upward?
Olympus OM-D EM-5 - PT-E08 - 8mm Panasonic - Zen 100mm Dome Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Olympus E-620 - PT-E06 - 50mm Zuiko - Athena 50mm Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Learned a LOT from folks on the internet, Thanks!

#8 KirkD

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 08:18 PM

If you use lightroom or photoshop, you can burn doen the sand. Sand is always bright. Remember that our eyes will drift to the brightest object in the Frame. I will often dodge and burn some ieepers tgat are going to print. When I shoot wide angle, i will often put my camera to the sand and shoot upwards, eliminating alot of the sand in the foreground,

So move the strobes further out, point them more outwards, and maybe position them a little higher? Or at least pointed more upward?


That should help.

#9 kmo_underwater

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 09:17 PM

I think underexposed refers more to the elements not lit by the strobe. A slower shutter speed would have allowed a brighter blue without making much difference to the strobe-lit foreground. A lighter background would have helped to disguise some of the backscatter as well.

#10 conchyjoe

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:12 AM

I think underexposed refers more to the elements not lit by the strobe. A slower shutter speed would have allowed a brighter blue without making much difference to the strobe-lit foreground. A lighter background would have helped to disguise some of the backscatter as well.

Gotcha, I was actually thinking the opposite and keeping the shutter speed high to reduce ambient light.
Olympus OM-D EM-5 - PT-E08 - 8mm Panasonic - Zen 100mm Dome Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Olympus E-620 - PT-E06 - 50mm Zuiko - Athena 50mm Port - Dual Inon Z240-3 - ULCS system
Learned a LOT from folks on the internet, Thanks!

#11 tdpriest

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:43 AM

The strobes need to be angled upwards to darken the intrusive sand, and, as we have all done, you haven't got close enough. Your rig should let you get much closer to the subject, and that, by itself, will improve the strobe lighting.

I would shoot this sort of subject by getting close, shooting upwards to remove the sand from the frame, and choosing a shutter speed to get the colour of the blue background right:

6316465846_68d5f4450b_b.jpg

Edited by tdpriest, 20 December 2012 - 05:54 AM.


#12 DiverPam

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:47 PM

Next time you are in the water with this new setup, try this (from Martin Edge's book) to help you get a sense of what setting to start with for getting the blues you want in the background. Using wide anlge setup and no strobes, pick a spot and shoot into the blue water different f stops and shutter speeds. Keep going until you get the type of blue you like. Make a note of what f stop and shutter speed you like best. Then use this as a starting place when you add your strobes to fill in the foreground. It really does help to try this exercise - and it can help give you a sense of how ambient light can work with your strobes to fill in the main focus of your picture. I was having a horrible time of lighting my wide angles stuff until I worked on this piece and understood how I wanted the blues to look.

Happy shooting. Looking forward to seeing more of your stuff - DiverPam

Nikon D90 in Aquatica Housing, Tokina 10-17mm, 60mm macro, 105mm macro, Sigma 17-70mm, + Ikelite DS 161 and DS-125 strobe combo  www.flickr.com/photos/pammurph/

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#13 pdemaagt

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:33 PM

Next time you are in the water with this new setup, try this (from Martin Edge's book) to help you get a sense of what setting to start with for getting the blues you want in the background. Using wide anlge setup and no strobes, pick a spot and shoot into the blue water different f stops and shutter speeds. Keep going until you get the type of blue you like. Make a note of what f stop and shutter speed you like best. Then use this as a starting place when you add your strobes to fill in the foreground. It really does help to try this exercise - and it can help give you a sense of how ambient light can work with your strobes to fill in the main focus of your picture. I was having a horrible time of lighting my wide angles stuff until I worked on this piece and understood how I wanted the blues to look.

Happy shooting. Looking forward to seeing more of your stuff - DiverPam

Hi Pam,
that is a very nice piece of advice!