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photography beginner advices

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#1 chloe.laisne

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Posted 25 September 2018 - 02:34 AM

Hey there,

 

I would love to try my hand at UW photography but I am realizing that my basic photography knowledge and skills might not be enough to dive into UW photography.

 

Does anyone have practical example for me to start with?

 

Thank you so much.

 

PS: I own a sony RX 100 mark II and I guess that the "RTFM" rule applies too!



#2 TimG

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Posted 25 September 2018 - 03:01 AM

Hi Chloe

 

Hard to know where to start answering your question!

 

If you want to combine learning more about photography with UW photography, it may well be worth getting a copy of Martin Edge's book, "The Underwater Photographer" (ISBN978-0-240-52164-0). At a modest 516 pages it takes you right through composition, camera settings, lighting - and the variations that UW needs. Even though it is, clearly, aimed at UW photographers, it does offer a very good guide to the basics of photography. I don't know if it's available in French but that might not matter to you.

 

I'd suggest the basics are understanding the effects and meaning of apertures, shutter speeds and ISO; then composition and how one impacts on the other; then lighting. There may be courses on offer in your community that could help you with these basic, but key, concepts.

 

But, as I say, if you can take a look at Martin Edge's book, I think that'd give you a great start.


Tim
(PADI IDC Staff Instructor and former Dive Manager, KBR Lembeh Straits)
Nikon D500, Nikkors 105mm and 8-15mm, Tokina 10-17mm,  Subal housing

http://www.timsimages.uk
Latest images: http://www.shutterst...lery_id=1940957


#3 lateralus821

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Posted 25 September 2018 - 11:35 AM

YouTube can be a great resource for learning but honestly the best thing to do is get hands on time with your camera and learn by doing. The biggest thing to study & mess around with is the balance of ISO, shutter speed, and aperture…plus focusing and depth of field but you get the idea. Once you've got that down you'll be fine for shooting underwater.



#4 chloe.laisne

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Posted 25 September 2018 - 11:36 AM

Thank you so much, I'll have a look to the book you're mentioning!

 

Hi Chloe

 

Hard to know where to start answering your question!

 

If you want to combine learning more about photography with UW photography, it may well be worth getting a copy of Martin Edge's book, "The Underwater Photographer" (ISBN978-0-240-52164-0). At a modest 516 pages it takes you right through composition, camera settings, lighting - and the variations that UW needs. Even though it is, clearly, aimed at UW photographers, it does offer a very good guide to the basics of photography. I don't know if it's available in French but that might not matter to you.

 

I'd suggest the basics are understanding the effects and meaning of apertures, shutter speeds and ISO; then composition and how one impacts on the other; then lighting. There may be courses on offer in your community that could help you with these basic, but key, concepts.

 

But, as I say, if you can take a look at Martin Edge's book, I think that'd give you a great start.



#5 okuma

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Posted 25 September 2018 - 01:55 PM

The first thing to master in U/W photography is your diving skills, particularly neutral buoyancy control.

You must be completely at ease under water to be able to concentrate on your photographic tasks!

 

To get off to a good start, I would recommend a weeks U/W photographic course such as  the Jim Church program on the Aggressor fleet.

 


Underwater Photography:
If it is so easy every one would be doing it!

Nikon D 500, Subal Housing, Inon Z 240 strobes.


#6 Ziyong_CHEN

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Posted 01 November 2018 - 07:14 PM

I am the beginner, too. I wonder how could you adjust the foucsing distance when the camera is the housing?



#7 TimG

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Posted 01 November 2018 - 10:37 PM

I am the beginner, too. I wonder how could you adjust the foucsing distance when the camera is the housing?

 

Hi!

 

The usual is to set the camera to Autofocus and use the camera's own internal system to achieve focus. If the camera or lens can't Autofocus, then you can sometimes fit a ring (known as a "focus ring") around the lens which has small cogs on it which engages with a control on the housing which will allow you to adjust focus manually by turning a dial on the outside of the housing.

 

If you mean though how do you control a zoom (rather than focus), then housing systems usually allow for a ring (a "zoom ring") which, again, fits around the lens and then engages with a control on the housing allowing you adjust zoom during the dive.

 

If you have at look at zoom ring options on the the website on one of the major housing manufacturers (eg, Nauticam, Subal, Aquatica) you'll get a better idea of what I'm trying to describe.


Tim
(PADI IDC Staff Instructor and former Dive Manager, KBR Lembeh Straits)
Nikon D500, Nikkors 105mm and 8-15mm, Tokina 10-17mm,  Subal housing

http://www.timsimages.uk
Latest images: http://www.shutterst...lery_id=1940957


#8 Weiry

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 08:18 PM

Yes I agree master diving skills and buoyancy first then you can relax and think about your photography skills 👌🏻

#9 Daniel M. Brown

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 09:38 PM

Very helpful! Thanks!







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