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Whale Shark Photo Documentation


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#1 .Greg

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 03:24 AM

Did a search and was unable to find another post with this information.

On the following page is a photo documentation of whale shark hunting from creating the hook all the way down to boxing for shipment.


Whale Shark Hunting Photos

It is from years past, but whale shark hunting still happens.

#2 shark8matt

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 08:07 AM

Did a search and was unable to find another post with this information.

On the following page is a photo documentation of whale shark hunting from creating the hook all the way down to boxing for shipment.


Whale Shark Hunting Photos

It is from years past, but whale shark hunting still happens.



Whale shark fishing was declared to be illegal by the Philippine Govt. a couple of years back. The Philippine Govt now promotes whale shark ecotourism. Unfortunately, there are still some small areas in Asia with active whale shark fisheries or illegal harvesting.

cheers!

- MDP
Matthew D. Potenski

The Shark Research Institute -Director of Field Operations
Bimini Biological Field Station - Sharklab - PIT Project Staff

www.matthewdpotenskiphoto.com

#3 WanderingBob

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 01:25 PM

On the following page is a photo documentation of whale shark hunting from creating the hook all the way down to boxing for shipment.
It is from years past, but whale shark hunting still happens.


That is an impressive operation! I can see why these guys and gals are smiling, so much meat must bring a pretty penny to a challenged economic region. But, for this day and age it does seem so sick to drag that fish to the shallows and make it suffer for days on end.

Along the lines of hunting whales and slaughtering dolphins, even if that is a fish and not a mammal.

Thanks for bringing this to our attention.
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#4 xariatay

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 06:22 PM

Thanks for sharing! It is difficult to see...
Unfortunately, Pamilacan Island is no longer the place where people go to see whalesharks. The islanders' life would have improved if they still have the whalesharks.
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#5 shark8matt

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 06:50 PM

Thanks for sharing! It is difficult to see...
Unfortunately, Pamilacan Island is no longer the place where people go to see whalesharks. The islanders' life would have improved if they still have the whalesharks.



Unfortunately, in many of these economically challenged areas, a distributor comes in and buys the fins, liver and most of the meat - the villagers who have taken all the risk and effort of landing the whale shark will make pennies per kilo. The meat is then sold for a huge markup. Developing eco-tourism in these areas provides sustainable income for these villages. However, in many economically challenged areas trying to get someone to see into the future can be a big problem - they see the size of a pile of money from a whale shark - say maybe $50 and compare it to taking 2 tourists out to see the sharks for $10 each. However, over time the money will be much greater from eco-tourism if they can see that $20 many times over. Inb a perfect wprld this would work like clockwork, but some damage cant be reversed. Hopefully the whale sharks will return to Pamilacan island and they can pursue some level of eco-tourism there.

cheers!

- MDP
Matthew D. Potenski

The Shark Research Institute -Director of Field Operations
Bimini Biological Field Station - Sharklab - PIT Project Staff

www.matthewdpotenskiphoto.com

#6 lomolove

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Posted 27 October 2009 - 07:04 PM

What a sad sight! I do hope the government there can do something about it or even other countries and organizations who cares can do something. We can't wait for these sharks to be endangered...