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What is wrong with my settings (Sony rx100iv )


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#1 caolino

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 08:08 PM

Hi,
I moved from my Olympus tg2 to Sony rx100 iv with single strobe sea and sea d2 and I get very controversial results.
At shallow depth it looks good but I can basically even avoid strobe but after 10m the situation change drammatically, the awb in the screen looks very blueish and after the flash the image is sometime overexposed or the opposite.
I shot in S with 1/100 iso80 and flas in ds ttl. Strobe in center position above the camera, diffuser 100 degree.
Thanks for your comments


a1f2b6c26c94c43b01bb806a7a3fc20b.jpg
a6d52eb0fe0c1d96bc50bcc0d2727823.jpg


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#2 Atobit

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 09:14 PM

Hello
I’m not specialist of this camera but when I look at your pictures it’s seems your strobe is oriented at the front of your target.
The lower part of the images are overexposed, while the above doesn’t receive any light from your strobe.
Depending of the distance between your camera and target you have to align you strobe adequately.

Next, 1/100 shutter speed seems to low, you have a lot of motion blur. 1/250 would be better.


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Edited by Atobit, 27 April 2018 - 09:16 PM.


#3 kdgonzalez

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Posted 28 April 2018 - 02:11 AM

I have to agree with Atobit. Both pictures are overexposed at the bottom which leads me to believe your strobe is actually pointed down rather than straight or ideally a little bit up from your subject.  Try putting the strobe in the 10-11 or 1-2 o'clock position, this way you get both the benefit of color and contrast as compared to top or side lighting. 



#4 caolino

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Posted 28 April 2018 - 02:44 AM

I have to agree with Atobit. Both pictures are overexposed at the bottom which leads me to believe your strobe is actually pointed down rather than straight or ideally a little bit up from your subject.  Try putting the strobe in the 10-11 or 1-2 o'clock position, this way you get both the benefit of color and contrast as compared to top or side lighting. 


Thanks both for the quick feedback
I changed the setting and the position of the strobe, find new position below
bf41daa90fd6f5261e18d70747bc5343.jpg
6b800655c1d5c4d4931d7fd4597ffeb6.jpg

What do you think?
Thanks
Giovanni


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#5 TimG

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Posted 28 April 2018 - 04:06 AM

One other thought Giovanni, when the strobe fires the light does not travel very far because of the effect of water. I'd suggest you get much closer to your subject, ideally 30-60 cms away. This reduces the amount of water between you and the subject and should give you better lighting and a clearer image.


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#6 kdgonzalez

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Posted 28 April 2018 - 10:42 AM

Heres a good intro article to strobe position.  I wouldnt position the strobe directly on top of the camera but a little more to the side.  Top position gives you better color, side position better contrast, diagonal should be a good compromise.  Since you have one strobe try to be aware of the sun and you can use it a second light source (usually also diagonal). Good luck

 

http://www.uwphotogr...obe-positioning


TimG is also right get as close as your subject will allow you.  I have dual YSD2 and even when shooting wide angle I am within 1-3 ft of my foreground.



#7 MikeVeitch

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 04:53 AM

Your strobe positioning is fine.  One of the main problems is that you are using S instead of M.  If you have a look at your photos I think you will find that most of them have an fstop of f2.8 or similar open fstop.  You are getting far too much natural light in the photos and the colour doesn't pop because of that.

 

Try using M with 1/125 or 1/200 on nicer day and f5.6 - f8 with ISO 200 and the strobe on TTL.


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#8 Undertow

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 09:41 AM

Mike is right. This is the second time recently I've seen the same question asked and people keep talking about the strobe.

 

(Yes you may find strobe positioning when over a bright bottom is something to work on but that's completely secondary to the main issue here.)

 

Your ambient (non-strobe) exposure is way too bright. 



#9 caolino

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 09:09 PM

Mike is right. This is the second time recently I've seen the same question asked and people keep talking about the strobe.
 
(Yes you may find strobe positioning when over a bright bottom is something to work on but that's completely secondary to the main issue here.)
 
Your ambient (non-strobe) exposure is way too bright. 


Thanks for all the feedback and I’m sorry for the stupid question. I’ve read a lot of articles for strobe positioning and general setting but never realised that the problem can be the overall exposure. I need to be honest and even on land I never use M so maybe I need to start from there. I have a friend with an Olympus tg4 with single strobe and he always use Auto and in general he takes better photo than me, the blue is definitely better e63109e3abc8e42ba85e9c951e133ac6.jpg (find picture below). I can’t match yet that blue
Thanks to all


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#10 kdgonzalez

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Posted 03 May 2018 - 08:50 PM

Have to disagree with Mike and undertow.  Your shutter speed is slow enough for the strobe to fill the scene. I would tend to agree if you had a shutter speed that was faster than your strobe (ie 1/250 or faster) but slow is not usually a problem.  See my photo below with same shutter speed both upclose and wide angle (shutter speed 1/100-1/160).  I do agree that you should shoot in M mode. 

 

25911181217_24190263f6_k.jpgfiji-20 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr

 

39819982905_cdd7b147fd_k.jpgfiji-25 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr

 

40715235701_83e1c0eec4_k.jpgfiji-22 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr

 

40715233511_df935b31ee_k.jpgfiji-24 by Karyll Gonzalez, on Flickr


Edited by kdgonzalez, 03 May 2018 - 08:54 PM.


#11 Undertow

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 01:37 PM

Have to disagree with Mike and undertow.  Your shutter speed is slow enough for the strobe to fill the scene. I would tend to agree if you had a shutter speed that was faster than your strobe (ie 1/250 or faster) but slow is not usually a problem.  See my photo below with same shutter speed both upclose and wide angle (shutter speed 1/100-1/160).  I do agree that you should shoot in M mode. 

 

I think you've misunderstood Mike and I. What we said has nothing to do with the strobe syncing with the camera (i.e. having too fast a shutter speed).

 

This is basic exposure stuff. When using strobes, you're mixing 2 forms of light:

 

1. Strobe Light

- strobe exposure determined by combination of strobe power and aperture

 

2. Ambient light from the sun

- ambient exposure determined by combination of shutter speed and aperture

 

In your excellent images, kdgonzalez, if you erased the strobe light (if your strobe didn't fire), they would be very dark, very underexposed. The eel image would likely be black. That means you have a dark ambient exposure. The issue with the original poster's images was that the ambient exposure was way too bright to begin with. 

 

There's no room for disagreement here, this is 100% true. 



#12 Uwshoot46

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Posted 22 November 2018 - 10:54 AM

Maybe the problem is easy to fix with new batteries in your strobe. I've had the same problem with old rechargeable batteries. Bought some fresh ones... problem solved.

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