Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Box fish


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Chris Kippax

Chris Kippax

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 49 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queensland Australia
  • Interests:The underwater world, wildlife photography and mechanical engineering

Posted 27 May 2018 - 01:24 AM

7865F9D1-828F-4331-A2FA-7022E13AAA32.jpeg

I have been trying for some time to get a decent image of a box fish. They usually keep their distance and show me their tail at every opportunity.This guy was kind enough to pose for me and swim into an area of negative space. I Shot this on a Canon 5dmkii, 100mm macro in an Ikelite housing with 2x ds160s and a subsee +5. The 5dmkii has an antiquated auto focus system and is frustrating to use at times, well at least for me anyway. I edited it in light room. This was my 5th dive with this camera previously using a compact canon G12. Of the 5 times I have dived with this set up this is the first time I got an image I am pleased with, and was beginning to get frustrated. I was having issues with sharpness but am beginning to think the dirty water I dive in plays some role in that. The dive was in a river with very low viz with a lot of suspended particulate due to river floor profiling being completed by a tug boat nearby.
Looking for constructive criticism on lighting/composition and post processing. Settings were from memory iso 100 f13 1/200
Thanks for your replys.

Edited by Chris Kippax, 27 May 2018 - 01:27 AM.


#2 ChrisRoss

ChrisRoss

    Sting Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 272 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney Australia

Posted 27 May 2018 - 03:44 AM

Skittish little buggers aren't they.  For me the composition is a touch tight and a little dark and muddy overall and colour balance is off a little, a bit too magenta/yellow and it can take quite a bit more USM.  I like contrast in my shots so for me I would also apply an s curve to boost the contrast.  If you open a levels layer and go through each of red/green/ blue screens and pull the white/black point in to meet the histogram curve at each end that will be close to the right colour balance.  This one has an odd histogram with a long tail at the highlight end and I like it with red/green clipped right up to the solid curve and adjusting the blue till it looks right, about halfway along the tail.

 

On shooting conditions are you using single point AF, what about a focus  light, suspect the diopter may have some impact on AF performance.  I used to have issues with the long macro on my olympus, locking onto particulates.  If you get it close to the right focus setting first it should generally lock on the subject..  Using rear button AF can also be helpful in controlling hunting.



#3 Chris Kippax

Chris Kippax

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 49 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queensland Australia
  • Interests:The underwater world, wildlife photography and mechanical engineering

Posted 27 May 2018 - 02:03 PM

Hi Chris
Thanks for your input!
In terms of camera setup I use single point AF, a 1000 lumen focus light and BBF. One of the limitations of the Ikelite housing is there is no control for focus point, so I am forced to use the centre point and crop, focus/recompose or the rock back and forth method.
I will try some of your suggestions in Lightroom, as I am sure most of us are I am self taught and definitely have room for improvement.
Thanks

#4 ChrisRoss

ChrisRoss

    Sting Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 272 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney Australia

Posted 27 May 2018 - 08:04 PM

I very rarely use anything but the centre point.  Learning how to adjust your colour balance via levels is the biggest step improvement you can make.  Once you get a feel for it you can do the adjustments without looking at the image and in most circumstances it's pretty close. 



#5 Fruitographer

Fruitographer

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 48 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Crystal River FL

Posted 28 May 2018 - 09:37 AM

It definitely looks like a plain old box that just happens to be a fish which can be difficult to photograph. Personally, I prefer to make texture stand out using my strobe position which can definitely help add depth to a fish without much going on. The lighting in this image looks pretty flat and more of a side light to make the fin and lips pop more would greatly help. Were you shooting TTL or manual for you strobes. If they are on TTL and putting out the same amount of light, one of them can be angled out more than the other to provide a feather that will give more shape rather than flatness. Even if I have 2 lights, one of them will be my key light that will be much brighter than my fill light just used to fill in the shadows slightly so they aren't pure black. With the DS160's there're 2 ways you can do this, either angle one light out more than the other or use an EV Controller with a sync cord attached to adjust the light on one side lower than the other while using TTL. If you're using Manual settings then you can still angle the strobe out or just turn it down a little to the desired effect. I've included a shot I took a while back that shows the effect of more side light using a single strobe. This image isn't perfect but it seemed to work for explaining how to make texture stand out more.

 

I've done a great deal of photography in situations where I have to predict when and where something will be before it happens, both on land and in the water. If you try to go after anything to get a shot, it will run and show it's tail. I've watched this happen over and over on manatee tours. On the other hand, if you can watch the pattern it swims or get ahead of it and sit in one spot while it swims to you, there's a better chance of getting something usable. Most people trying to photograph manatees will only focus on getting a photo rather than being friends with it and establishing a connection. Those people never get a shot and they are scrambling and chasing the whole time. I make friends with them so they want to hang out while only spending a fraction of the time actually taking a shot. I end up with the best angles and images every time. Sometimes though things are skittish and there's nothing you can do. 

Attached Images

  • Greenling SRGB-.jpg


#6 Chris Kippax

Chris Kippax

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 49 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Queensland Australia
  • Interests:The underwater world, wildlife photography and mechanical engineering

Posted 06 June 2018 - 07:46 PM

20180525-IMG_5347VAN ART.jpg

 

Take 2.

Adjusted white balance, more contract, different crop, more post crop vignetting. played with the tone curve a bit too.



#7 Fruitographer

Fruitographer

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 48 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Crystal River FL

Posted 08 June 2018 - 12:17 PM

I definitely like the crop better with more room in the leading direction. The color seems a little muted though compared to the first image. Try bringing the vibrance or saturation up. One other thing you could do is get rid of all the backscatter. In Photoshop you can use a filter under noise then select dust and scratches. Make the adjustment until the backscatter disappears. Try to keep the grain close to the same or it might not look as good. There are plenty of tutorials on how to do this. Once you've applied the filter, in the history panel select the paint brush next to the filter you just applied but select the previous action. Use the history brush to paint in the filtered effects using the darken blend mode into the action previous to applying the filter. Look it up on YouTube if you have questions.