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Pelagic photography with 5dmkii


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#1 Chris Kippax

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 01:58 PM

Hi All

I am planning a trip to French Polynesia and have some questions for anyone with experience shooting pelagics with a 5Dmkii. 

I will be using the 8-15 F4 lens at the 15mm end. Is it best to use the centre AF spot with tracking or lock the focus point at around 600mm/2 feet and use F11 and adjust iso/shutter speed for exposure. I want to maximize my sharp images and sadly I don't have a great deal of faith in the 5d AF with fast moving targets.

Thanks,

 



#2 Chris Kippax

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 04:42 PM

I will do some testing in the pool this week and see what works best. I think that locking the focus may be my best bet.



#3 Tom_Kline

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 12:45 PM

I have not used the 5D2 but I have used a few of the older tech AF DSLRs. I would stick with just the center point and forget tracking as that can move the AF point to one of the weaker AF points which might be especially bad given that the lens has an f/4 maximum aperture. Just try and keep the camera pointed at the subject with it on the center point. I have not used focus locking with the separate button (also can lock exposure) but others have. If I want the AF to stay locked I use single-shot AF and not continuous servo AF. It will stop AFing once the beep goes off in single shot.

 

Good idea to do some pool testing!


Edited by Tom_Kline, 12 July 2018 - 12:46 PM.

Thomas C. Kline, Jr., Ph. D.
Oceanography & Limnology
Currently used housed digital cameras: Canon EOS-1Ds MkIII, EOS-1D MkIV, and EOS-1DX; and Nikon D3X. More or less retired: Canon EOS-1Ds MkII; and Nikon D1X, D2X, and D2H.

Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 200mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 60D, 150D, and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.

http://www.salmonography.com/

 


#4 ChrisRoss

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 05:17 PM

I don't have experience with the 5D II but have used older similar vintage Canons.  My experience has been that wide angles are pretty snappy to focus as long as you put the AF point over something.  I would suggest using back button to get it focused then shooting away.   If you want to get in the zone and you've found it is having trouble focusing then see if you can use another diver at about the right distance to focus on while waiting for your subjects to come in.



#5 errbrr

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 02:55 PM

Back button focus, keep your f-stop narrow and use ISO/shutter speed to make things brighter instead. The 5D2 doesn't have very many focus points and the central one is noticeably better than the others. So if you are trying to track small objects in the blue, it will struggle until you get the focus point on the animal for long enough to work.

 

I suggest focusing on your fin tip at furthest extension, then snapping away. If the animals are further away than that...either refocus, or try and get closer.



#6 Chris Kippax

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 09:31 PM

Back button focus, keep your f-stop narrow and use ISO/shutter speed to make things brighter instead. The 5D2 doesn't have very many focus points and the central one is noticeably better than the others. So if you are trying to track small objects in the blue, it will struggle until you get the focus point on the animal for long enough to work.

 

I suggest focusing on your fin tip at furthest extension, then snapping away. If the animals are further away than that...either refocus, or try and get closer.

Thanks Liz, Glad you chimed in. That sounds like the best way to get some sharp images with the 5d2, from what I remember you used this camera for some time

. Is there a big party planned for Dr Harris?



#7 errbrr

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 02:32 PM

It's a great camera, I wish you luck with it. I took hundreds of thousands of images with my two and managed a few nice shots.