Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Joby Gorillapod Focus w/ DSLR housing


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 ComeFromAway

ComeFromAway

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 10 October 2017 - 07:45 PM

Considering picking up a Gorillapod Focus tripod (legs only) to shoot brook trout with this fall. Last year I used an old RocketFish tripod, but the overall footprint was quite large. I'd like something smaller and less intrusive near the trout redds. I came across this Gorillapod model, but am unsure how well it might hold the weight of a DSLR housing. For reference, I'm using an Ikelite D7000. Anyone with experience use this with a DSLR?



#2 tassietraveller

tassietraveller

    Clownfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 22 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tasmania, Australia

Posted 11 October 2017 - 08:55 AM

Hi,

 

I don't have an answer to your question, but I'm really interested to hear the replies.

 

I also shoot with a D7000 in an Ikelite housing. I have recently relocated to Northern California and was interested in getting some trout and salmon pics over the coming months. In particular, some split shots with fish below and redwoods above would be sweet.

 

Where are you located?



#3 rgilkes

rgilkes

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 31 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 October 2017 - 08:55 AM

I have the GorillaPod SLR Zoom model, which is supposed to hold up to 6.6lbs. I've never tried to mount my uw housing on it, but I can try it and let you know if it can support it. I have a Nauticam a7rii, 16-35 and 8" zoom (don't know the exact weight of everything, but someone else here may know).



#4 ComeFromAway

ComeFromAway

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 11 October 2017 - 09:48 AM

That would be useful. Thanks!



#5 ComeFromAway

ComeFromAway

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 11 October 2017 - 09:51 AM

@tassietraveller

 

I live on the complete opposite coast in Prince Edward Island, Canada. Trout and presumably salmon are approachable via snorkeling, but last fall I was able to get my best images with the camera on a tripod and a piece of bicycle brake cable attached to the housing's shutter lever. Tom Kline here on Wetpixel has the technique down to an art and has captured some truly stunning images of various salmonids using a tripod and more sophisticated wired shutter release system.



#6 tassietraveller

tassietraveller

    Clownfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 22 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tasmania, Australia

Posted 11 October 2017 - 11:30 AM

@ComeFromAway

 

Ah yes, that rings a bell now you mention it. I think I may have read the original exchange between you and Tom (or part of it). Sounds like a cool idea!

 

I was thinking of getting in the water initially, although it's rapidly getting pretty cold and a remote set up sounds like a great way to go. Do you have any pics online I could have a look at? Would be cool to see!



#7 ComeFromAway

ComeFromAway

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 11 October 2017 - 03:27 PM

I spent about 30 hours last year sitting along the riverbank just watching our local brook trout spawn. It bordered on a spiritual experience. Bring along a thermos of coffee/tea, small camping chair, and even a book (in case the fish scatter when you get to the river) and you'll be set. The brake cable you can pick up from Walmart or any sporting goods store. I had to splice together two 12 ft lengths and even that was too short and required another section of rope. Hitting focus is really difficult and I still haven't found the best method other than using a small aperture and praying for the best. Pre-focusing didn't really work either; I seemed to have better results using Auto-Area.a

 

You can see some of the images from last fall here: https://maptia.com/s...ries/trout-love. A few were taken while snorkeling, but the majority shot with the tripod/brake cable rig.



#8 tassietraveller

tassietraveller

    Clownfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 22 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tasmania, Australia

Posted 10 November 2017 - 12:30 AM

Lovely pics and a nicely written article! Thanks for sharing.
Can I ask what lens you were using? Do you use TTL settings for the strobes or manual?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

#9 adamtaylor

adamtaylor

    Moray Eel

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 77 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bowen Island, British Columbia, Canada

Posted 12 November 2017 - 01:44 PM

Considering picking up a Gorillapod Focus tripod (legs only) to shoot brook trout with this fall. Last year I used an old RocketFish tripod, but the overall footprint was quite large. I'd like something smaller and less intrusive near the trout redds. I came across this Gorillapod model, but am unsure how well it might hold the weight of a DSLR housing. For reference, I'm using an Ikelite D7000. Anyone with experience use this with a DSLR?

I have used a Gorillpod Focus with my Olympus EM5 in Nauitcam Housing.

I would recommend the more robust Focus over the SLR model as it supports more weight.

With the standard flat / macro port things worked well. But with 180mm glass dome and moving strobe / video lights up and forward the gorillapod would creep.

Same issue with 180mm dome in streams with any noticeable current... you have to ensure to adjust it just right or the additional pressure causes some creep / settlement.

This is particularly noticeable trying for over-under images if you position the strobe / video arms up in the air over the camera / water. The centre of gravity shifts and the gorillapod struggles to carry the load.

Good luck


Adam

Sent from my SM-G903W using Tapatalk
<p>Olympus OMD E-M5, Nauticam Housing,12-40 f2.8 with 180mmm dome & extensions, 12-50mm & 60mm in macro port, 8mm Panasonic Fisheye in 4" mini-dome, 2 x YS-D1, Sola 800

#10 ComeFromAway

ComeFromAway

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 32 posts

Posted 13 November 2017 - 04:23 AM

Thanks, Adam. That's helpful.

 

@tassietraveller I use a Tokina 10-17 fisheye. Last year I was still only using a single strobe positioned above the camera. No TTL, just manual settings. I would take test shots while setting up to dial in the correct settings.



#11 adamtaylor

adamtaylor

    Moray Eel

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 77 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bowen Island, British Columbia, Canada

Posted 14 November 2017 - 06:46 AM

Thanks, Adam. That's helpful.
 
@tassietraveller I use a Tokina 10-17 fisheye. Last year I was still only using a single strobe positioned above the camera. No TTL, just manual settings. I would take test shots while setting up to dial in the correct settings.

A frw more thoughts.

Positioning two legs to the front helps compensate for creep. But depending on how far forward you set your strobes you may need to strap a weight to the rear leg (or all legs if there is much current).

Also, when available light is good, and only a single strobe required I have rotated the second strobe behind or beside the camera to act as a counterweight for the forward strobe, or to compensate for current pushing on the dome.


Basically I found that by starting with a solid base, and adjusting components upwards from there minimized the fine-tuning required.

Sent from my SM-G903W using Tapatalk
<p>Olympus OMD E-M5, Nauticam Housing,12-40 f2.8 with 180mmm dome & extensions, 12-50mm & 60mm in macro port, 8mm Panasonic Fisheye in 4" mini-dome, 2 x YS-D1, Sola 800