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Brand new to underwater photography, looking for advice to get started


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#21 Fruitographer

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 09:14 PM

The more I think about it the more I agree that a crop sensor would be better for someone just getting into underwater photography. the size of dome ports you need for a full frame is definitely a big consideration as well and a big piece of equipment to lug around. the Sony a6500 looks like a nice little camera that I would imagine would be pretty good and compact. There's quite a bit of older Sony equipment for some great deals. I've only used a Sony RX100 V with a Nauticam wet wide angle lens and was able to get some pretty decent shots. Sony makes many of the camera sensors even for other manufactures so I'm sure they're camera sensor are pretty good. I'm wondering if anyone has any experience with the older NEX5 or NEX7 cameras underwater. They have a crop sensor and can be found for pretty cheap. There's a Nauticam housing for NEX5 on eBay for $400 and the camera is only around $100 through eBay as well. Personally I would use the 50mm f2.8 macro that costs $200. required N85 to N120 port adaptor is $480 and the macro port is $360. So what seems like a good deal for a housing that only costs $400 now just turned into $1,540. The more I look at the compact Sony crop sensor the more it entices me. From the stats, they seem like pretty good cameras. I wish I could say from my own experience whether they were any good or not. I also found a full kit for a Sony NEX5n on eBay with 2 ports and 2 lenses. You still may need to get some other ports and a macro lens to shoot close up, but this kit would get you in the water. for much less than it would've been separately. The reviews don't look good for what yo could get today. the NEX5 is probably not a great option for what's currently available.

https://www.ebay.com...6oAAOSwPN9bGgJw

 

The Fuji XT-2 would be a great camera underwater on land and in the water with outstanding color rendition. My father has been doing photography for over 45 years and has the XT-1 and loves it. To get anything Fuji though would have to be purchased new which puts anything from them way outside the price range for this discussion. But now we can rule them out.

 

If you go with Sony, here is a good article about different macro lenses available with comparison photos. Pretty good article.

http://www.divephoto...y-part-1-macro/


Edited by Fruitographer, 13 June 2018 - 09:54 PM.


#22 Barmaglot

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 01:01 AM

NEX-5 is really old - I think it's the first E-mount camera that Sony made, so it's a v1.0 release of an entirely new product line. There's a reason people are selling them off so cheaply. For one thing, they lack PDAF - the first camera in that line that had it was A6000, with A6300 featuring a significantly improved version - so the focus is going to hunt like most compacts (not RX100V, which also has PDAF). On the other hand, the only differences between A6300 and A6500 are: in-body image stabilization, focus point selection via touchscreen, one more C button, and $400-500 in cost, both new and used.



#23 ChrisRoss

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 04:26 AM

The Sony is a great little camera, however the Achilles heel is the lens lineup.  If what they offer suits you that's fine, for UW there's basically the 10-18, and the 90mm macro.  Do some research before selecting the 30 or 50mm macro lenses and there is no native fisheye lens, you have to use convertors either lens adapters or fisheye lenses.  The 16-70 is a nice lens but doesn't focus super close and there's also the 16-50 kit lens.  

 

m43 on the other hand have a lens for every occasion and they all focus super close and being a smaller sensor are not as demanding on dome size as their larger sensor-ed cousins for wide angle rectilinear lenses.  I'm shooting an EM-1 MkII previously used the Em-5 MkII. both great little cameras.



#24 Barmaglot

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 04:50 AM

If you can live with manual focus, there are native e-mount fisheye lenses from Rokinon/Samyang and 7Artisans.