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Blackwater photo tips?

blackwater hawaii tips

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#1 heynsheyns

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Posted 22 April 2018 - 12:46 PM

Hi all, 

 

I'm going to Hawaii for some blackwater diving later this year and looking to learn more about any tips/techniques that will help me maximize the opportunity. 

 

Shooting an RX100 rig with both macro and wide angle lenses, dual sea & sea YS-D2 strobes, and some video lights as well. 

 

What's the best way to get good photos of critters that come up? Are there good presets for that kind of thing? 



#2 okuma

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Posted 22 April 2018 - 06:05 PM

Go to Face book /black water photo group

A full web site devoted to black water diving.


Underwater Photography:
If it is so easy every one would be doing it!

Nikon D 500, Subal Housing, Inon Z 240 strobes.


#3 heynsheyns

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Posted 23 April 2018 - 02:28 PM

Excellent tip, thank you!



#4 Tom_Kline

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Posted 23 April 2018 - 02:34 PM

Be prepared to shoot very small creatures. I took this shot several years ago of the DM pointing out a comb jelly: https://www.salmonog...tes/i-gsmF4NM/A

 

You will need a good focusing light - the brighter the better!  I bring along a narrow beam light as well to search for incoming things. Make sure you have a tether for your camera system.

 

I have a lot of examples of inverts in the same gallery as the link above. As well, there can be larval fishes - I have shots of them in this gallery: https://www.salmonog...Fish-Portraits/

While not transparent like the jellies, some can move rather fast make focusing challenging as well.


Thomas C. Kline, Jr., Ph. D.
Oceanography & Limnology
Currently used housed digital cameras: Canon EOS-1Ds MkIII, EOS-1D MkIV, and EOS-1DX; and Nikon D3X. More or less retired: Canon EOS-1Ds MkII; and Nikon D1X, D2X, and D2H.

Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 200mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 60D, 150D, and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.

http://www.salmonography.com/

 


#5 hmrb7

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Posted 23 April 2018 - 02:36 PM

Take a look at this recent article too - http://www.uwphotogr...ter-photography

And a bright focus light with a narrow beam works best for spotting the critters in the first place.



#6 Tom_Kline

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Posted 23 April 2018 - 02:51 PM

Nice article! On my last trip to HI (2018) I tried low rather than high ISO (see article) and had some success. Recent shots at the the top (gallery is in reverse chrono order) of the gallery with the DM shot mentioned above. https://www.salmonog...-Invertebrates/

 

Low ISO allowed me to do more vigorous PP without noise. FYI EXIF data for my shots are in the tiny dot with the "i" in it to the left of the buy button (Smugmug interface). As well my apertures were not as small as suggested. f/14 was OK for me DOF-wise. Too small an aperture like those suggested can result in a loss of resolution. I was using 8 AA batteries with each of my Retra strobes so did not have to wait for recycling (issue brought up in article).


Thomas C. Kline, Jr., Ph. D.
Oceanography & Limnology
Currently used housed digital cameras: Canon EOS-1Ds MkIII, EOS-1D MkIV, and EOS-1DX; and Nikon D3X. More or less retired: Canon EOS-1Ds MkII; and Nikon D1X, D2X, and D2H.

Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 200mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 60D, 150D, and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.

http://www.salmonography.com/