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Question on “reef fish identification “


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#1 Cerianthus

Cerianthus

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 03:44 AM

I recently got Humann and Deloach guide to reef fish identification. I am not a native speaker and a word often used in the description of the geographical distribution of species puts me off balance. It is the word balance, e.g. in rare south Florida northern and southwestern carribean. Not reported Bahamas or balance of Caribbean

What does the balance mean in this description?

Gerard

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#2 adamhanlon

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 04:26 AM

Hi Gerard,

 

English is so inexact! It is an excellent book.

 

In this instance, "balance" means "the rest of"...

 

So to translate the phrase they are saying that this species has not been reported from the Bahamas or from the rest of the Caribbean.

 

Hope this make sense!

 

Adam


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#3 Cerianthus

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 06:51 AM

Hai Adam. Yes it does. Cheers!

Gerard

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Crop the world ! (Using Canon 70D, 60mm, 100mm, 10-17mm FE, Ikelite)


#4 Humu797

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 06:02 PM

Excellent explanation. The use of the word balance in this case seems more to be an UK-English than an American-English expression. Still valid in both places, but used less.