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Giant Sea Bass Poaching


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#1 Steve Douglas

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 09:42 AM

That they used to be everywhere and now are only barely coming back says something. This was just sent to me:
California Department of Fish and Game News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - June 5, 2012

Media Contacts:

Warden Patrick Foy, DFG Law Enforcement, (916) 651-2084

DFG Cites Poacher for Harvesting Giant (Black) Sea Bass


A California Department of Fish and Game (DFG) warden has cited a southern California man for the illegal take of a giant (black) sea bass.

Scott Andrew Carlton, 30, of Corona Del Mar was spear fishing on Friday night at approximately 7:30 p.m. at Salt Creek Beach at Dana Point in Orange County when he speared a state-protected giant sea bass, commonly called a black sea bass. A concerned citizen took a photo of the man and his catch, then notified a nearby CHP officer. The CHP detained Carlton, and notified DFG dispatch. Warden Justin Sandvig arrived and cited Carlton, who claimed ignorance of the law. Take of giant sea bass is a misdemeanor.

Prior to the 1950s, large numbers of giant (black) sea bass could be found in the waters off of southern California, but most of these large creatures were harvested for their value as photographic trophies. Known for their docile behavior, the slow-moving black sea bass resides mostly near the shoreline in deep rocky environments and can grow up to 500 pounds and seven feet long.

Ignorance of the law is no excuse, especially when poaching state-protected species, said Capt. Dan Sforza of DFG's Law Enforcement Division. Giant (black) sea bass are cherished by many ocean enthusiasts because of their size and docile nature.
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#2 DamonA

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 10:38 PM

Spearo' criminal, fine the living arse out of the man, make him a bad example!

They are lovely placid looking fish, would be a joy to dive with a big one!

here's some info/photo's - http://www.uwphotogr.../black-sea-bass


Be really nice to see Californian's develop a greater Pride in their marine fauna, to swap V8 engines for 500lb black sea bass....Dr Bill is the point man!
"The oldest fish scientifically aged was 75 years old and weighed 435 pounds, although the size-age relationship depends on food availability and other factors. Black sea bass are believed to live over 100 years, reaching lengths of 7 1/2 feet. In 1910 conservationist Charles F. Holder (co-founder of the Tuna Club) said 800 pound individuals were being taken off Catalina and pressed for their protection."

We have simular situation with the southern black cod-Epinephelus daemelii http://www.dpi.nsw.g...overy/black-cod

The more and more we look, the more we see of ignorance of hunter gathers- spearfishermen.....past their used by date!

Edited by DamonA, 16 September 2012 - 10:49 PM.


#3 kmo_underwater

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 05:42 AM

I don't know much about the situation with giant sea bass on the other side of the world, but I'm glad they caught the guy and took action back in June. Hopefully the same thing happens to anyone taking black rockcod on the east coast by line, spear, or commercially.

We have simular situation with the southern black cod-Epinephelus daemelii http://www.dpi.nsw.g...overy/black-cod

The more and more we look, the more we see of ignorance of hunter gathers- spearfishermen.....past their used by date!


From the NSW DPI document that you linked to: "Black Rockcod (Epinephelus Daemelii) Recovery Plan"

There are now few reports of spearfishers illegally targeting Black Rockcod. Many spearfishers are actively involved in conservation activities, including the reporting of sightings to NSW DPI threatened and protected species sighting program. Some spearfishers, in an effort to improve their public image, have sought to have a level of accreditation introduced into their sport, which would involve an element of education about species like Black Rockcod and improved species identification. Despite such efforts, isolated incidents of illegal take of Black Cod continue to occur.

Risk
Spearfishing would have had a significant impact on Black Rockcod from the 1950s to 1970s. The spearing of Black Rockcod continues to occur infrequently and is now considered a low risk to Black Rockcod.

So modern spearfishers are actively involved in assisting fisheries research and being conservative in their spearfishing, but need to admit that there are occaisionally bad eggs which do stupid things either out of ignorance or bad attitude. They are taking active measures to educate, above and beyond what DPI are doing, but can't talk to everyone.

You can paint all spearos as ignorant and past their used by date, but someone could do the same thing for all divers when a bad dive charter drags anchor through a sanctuary zone, or a newbie diver kicks the crap out of coral trying to get a photo. I personally don't think that would be fair.

#4 DamonA

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 09:03 PM

You can paint all spearos as ignorant and past their used by date, but someone could do the same thing for all divers when a bad dive charter drags anchor through a sanctuary zone, or a newbie diver kicks the crap out of coral trying to get a photo. I personally don't think that would be fair.


OK SORRY- lets rephrase, the vast majority of spearos, the learners, the ordinary, the try hards!
not you or the "elite" but really you just want to kill a fish=success! Dead jacks that get binned after a competition, smelly public garbage bin too!


Personally, there comes a time where you must side with the fish; as they are the ones in trouble after millions of years without any help.....they don't need your help!
they just need protection from the predation and pollution by MAN!!!

Well think of it this way, you got 7billion humans now, be 9billion by 2050 on projection of current birth rate- lets look at countries in which spearfish was developed and used extensively- Greece, Spain, Dalamacia, Albania and Italy ask yourself what happened to the fish life in those places, have a look at thoses places if you see a fish over 3" it's exciting.....

If spearfishing grows here in australia, whats going to happen to our marine environment over time???

The only good thing about spearfishing is without tanks your limited to about 22m..........In 1901 the SMH had a article on a 1000lb black marlin wedged between the piers at Manly wharf, it was chasing Mackerel tuna/Kingfish. What happened to that fishery? But still lets give you freedom to continue in the face of extinction of these poor blighted creatures for whom you have no real love for except for a passion to stalk, hunt and kill, you see a nudi branch as beautiful and a snapper as a target...the way you change fish behaviour to divers is what really make this north and south- until the time you swap out the speargun for a camera(or go hunt goats pigs foxes/ aka feral animals- thats what I do with bow and arrow- but I hunt on privately own land using a deadly weapon, not on public property!)



Charter boats shouldn't be allowed to anchor period(unless its an emergency/breakdown)- they should dive off a live boat and have crew who can deal with that(and boats fitted with prop guards!). Better still moorings should be provided as it stops line fishermen poaching at night(they get hung up on close spaced mooring lines- have interconnect lines that make it even worse for poachers).

North and South!

we need a bill of rights internationale' which annexes all life on this planet- and gives stolen property back as well!

If you want to do something exciting a"thrill kill"? try this- http://www.somalicruises.com/

Testimonials



"I got three confirmed kills on my last trip. I'll never hunt big game in Africa again. I felt like the Komandant in Schindlers list!" -- Lars , Hamburg Germany
"Six attacks in 4 days was more than I expected. I bagged three pirates and my 12yr old son sank two rowboats with the minigun. PIRATES: 0 - PASSENGERS: 32! Well worth the trip. Just make sure your spotter speaks English" -- Donald, Salt Lake city Utah USA
"I haven't had this much fun since flying choppers in NAM . Don't worry about getting shot by pirates as they never even got close to the ship with those weapons they use and their shitty aim--reminds me of a drunken'juicer' door gunner we picked up from the motor pool back in Nam" -- 'chopper' Dan, Toledo USA.
"Like ducks in a barrel. They turned the ship around and we saw them cry in the water like little girls. Saw one wounded pirate eaten by sharks--what a laugh riot! This is a must do." -- Zeke, Springs Kentucky USA



It's people there's too many of them!


Edited by DamonA, 17 September 2012 - 10:00 PM.


#5 kmo_underwater

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 11:02 PM

I see there is no point continuuing this discussion.