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Ultimate photo resource book?


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#1 Poliwog

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 04:07 PM

Hi:

Whenever I've encountered a problem or just wanted to understand a technical challenge, I've always had a photography book or two to turn to. Mine has been my old college standbys called "Basic Photography" and "Advanced Photography" by the late Micheal Langford published by Focal Press. ISBN 0 240 51592 7

What is your text book of "last resort" when confronted with a photographic problem you just can't seem to solve? A brief narrative as to why you feel this is the book(s) for you would be interesting also. I'm interested in philosophical texts that relate to photography as well.

I would appreciate it if you could include the ISB Number to make tracking down a copy on Amazon.com or Chapters/Indigo.ca easier :lol: .

Thanks,


Poliwog
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#2 RogerC

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 06:06 PM

I've used a fully manual camera since I was a kid, and with the screen on the digital acting as a light meter, the camera itself doesn't stump me too often.

That said, I still read Jim Church's composition book around once a year. I subscribe to Outdoor Photographer, and every month or two there is an article in there I learn something from, again, more about composition than mechanics. I'd have to say that both resources are on the philosophy side for me.

I also really enjoy Galen Rowell's books. Not much more philosophical for photgraphers than his stuff.

#3 Tom_Kline

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 09:54 PM

I have never forked over the cash for Langford though I am in my 4th decade of accumulating photo books. :P I have at least 50 on UW Photo. <_< My UWP bible is In-Water Photography by Mertens 1970 published by Wiley - I have used it to answer questions on this forum. :o There are a number of other very handy UWP books too. However I find myself consulting instruction manuals the most these days!!!!! :huh: Unfortunately they are not always comprehensive enough. :lol: I was totally stumped by the need to re-calibrate the battery of my D2H while overseas but could not find the instructions in the pdf of the manual. :D The calibration light came on when I charged the battery but the cam always gave me the same need to calibrate message after charging. :D I figured it out when I got home when I saw a somewhat oblique instruction in Moose Petersen's D2H book (I also looked up ALL the pages indexed for battery trying to find out!!! :D ). Of course it was very easy to do, just not obvious for an old-time analogger!!! :D

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#4 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 06:20 AM

I quoted Mertens on here recently too. I think in a recent rant about the fact people aren't using dioptres on wide angles. Anyway I have given up on that quest now. If people want their images to be sub-optimum it is fine by me.

My favourite is the Manual Of Underwater Photography by De Couet and Green.

OK it is very Nik V era focused. But it is the book I used to learn UW photography. The photos in it are very poor by today's standards. But the information is still good. But the dedication at the start of this book still motivates me, it says something like "This book is dedicated to all those who have shown the sea is worth saving".

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#5 Paul Kay

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 06:43 AM

I have to agree with Alex, my copy of Underwater Photography is now very battered. I'd also suggest Martin Evening's books on Photoshop and Bruce Fraser's Camera Raw books. Langford's are solid technique books too - I'm always amazed just how few underwater photographers seem to want to get to grips with basic photo theory.
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#6 scorpio_fish

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 07:19 AM

Steve Simmons, "Using the View Camera"

"Photograhic Materials and Processes" Leslie Stroebel, et al
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#7 Poliwog

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 04:52 PM

Hi guys:

Thanks for the quick replies to the question I posed on the "text of last resort".

I found a copy of Bruce Fraser's "Camera Raw with Adobe Photshop CS" sitting on my bookshelf. It is indeed a very informative book and have incorporated a lot of the the suggestions made in the book to my digital workflow. I also have a copy of Jim Church's "Essential Guide to Nikonos Systems" an indispensible book if you own a Nikonos (my opinion).

I will definitely order a copy of Martin Edge's book after having read the reviews. I have not had any exposure to Galen Rowell's books (sorry for the pun!) but may give his "Inner Game of Outdoor Photography" a go.

I located used copies of:

"Using the View Camera", by Steve Simmons
"Photograhic Materials and Processes" by Leslie Stroebel, et al,
"Manual Of Underwater Photography" by De Couet and Green,
"In-Water Photography" by Mertens 1970 published by Wiley ,

on the internet at quite reasonable prices. I will check my local used book dealer for these before ordering via internet.


Thanks,


Poliwog
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#8 Tom_Kline

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 10:53 PM

I quoted Mertens on here recently too. I think in a recent rant about the fact people aren't using dioptres on wide angles. Anyway I have given up on that quest now. If people want their images to be sub-optimum it is fine by me.

snip
Alex

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Alex,
I presume you are referring to section 6.3.2. He does not explicitly state that the 'correcting lens', (top of p. 155) is a diopter, but it might be implied from the previous page where he states: ' A converging lens (of about 1/(4R) diopter *) can be added to the camera lens for correction purposes', ????
The asterisk refers to a footnote with a neat formula.

However, I cannot find any reference that states that curvature of field produced by a diopter is determined soley by its diopter. In fact Kingslake (in 2 different books) implies that diopter field curvature is a variable, determined by how flat the diopter is. This would suggest that optimal results would come from a custom made diopter lens for a given port and lens combination.
Tom B)

Thomas C. Kline, Jr., Ph. D.
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Canon EOS-1Ds MkII and MkIII and Nikon D1X, D2X, D2H cameras. Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 180mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 150D and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.
www.flickr.com/photos/tomkline/

 

 


#9 scorpio_fish

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 01:22 PM

I should have qualified my response. Steve Simmons book is only useful if you have a view camera. Leslie Stroebel's book is more of a photography text book used in a semester or year long class. It's the kind of book that will not in any way make your photos better. It's more technical.

The reason I listed them is because I go back to them more often because; 1) I don't use the large format camera very often and 2) technical information continually leaks out my right ear, so over time it is gone from my memory banks.

Another great educational book is Fraser's Real World Color Management. Less "how to" than Real World Raw, but more interesting.
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#10 Poliwog

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 04:52 PM

Not to worry scorpio_fish.

I can always drag out the ancient Arca-Swiss 4x5 I have for Simmons.

Leslie Stroebel's book seems like it might be interesting for obscure formulas and techniques. Will give it a good going over before deciding to plunk down the cash for it.

Will research Fraser's other book "Real world Color Management", but will concentrate on the titles mentioned in previous posts.

I'm more interested in the older volumes not for their technical expertise as it relates to photography today, but as an overall approach to refining the creation of photographic images if this makes sense to you.

I too have the same ear problem but on the left side, maybe it has something to do with being left handed in my case. ;)
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