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What CC number for making underwater filter?


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#1 blues

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 06:45 AM

Was thinking of making a filter like the ones being sold around these parts. Anyone with experience with one have an idea of what the approximate color correction would be?

Thanks.

#2 james

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 06:58 AM

See the article by Craig Jones in our library.

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#3 blues

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 08:09 AM

A link would be nice.

I tried typing in Craig Jones in both search fields and got nada, so could you be a little more specific?

#4 james

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 08:11 AM

Click on Features -> Still Photo

Then click on the article by Craig Jones about filter photography.

For folks following along, there are close to 100 articles on Wetpixel full of information.

Cheers
James
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#5 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 08:30 AM

The other problem is getting hold of the filters. Probably the most popular gels are in the industry standard Kodak Wratten range. Popular is not a very accurate word, though. Last time I tried to get some of these in the UK, Kodak UK said that they had stopped importing them because of lack of demand and I had to get them shipped in from abroad. It can get expensive, quickly, especially if you want to try several strengths.

IMO I have found CC gels only work in narrow depth ranges. For example the popular CC40R I think is best between 2 and 5m. Shallow than 2m it is too strong, and deeper than 5m it is too weak.

Alex

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#6 blues

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 08:35 AM

Craig-- got it now, thanks!

Alex--I agree with availability issues, however, I have an assortment of Kodak CC R filters ranging from 10 to 50 in increments of 10. I'm curious to try them out.

#7 Jolly

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 06:15 PM

Hi,

thinking of Craig's recommendations and the two effects of water he has written about, I would suggest adding a conversion filter to your correcting filters (especially for larger depth). KR filters available from something like 1.5 to 15 (numbered 81 and 85 in Kodak's screwed up Wratten language). I would tend towards a strength of 10 as starting point.

Julian
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