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D30 or D60


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#1 Simon K.

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 10:35 PM

Hi I planned to buy myself a D60 i would get it for around 2400 ($: nearly 1:1). Now I have the possibility to buy a used but very well cared for D30 with 2 years of Gurantee (it is the test and lending housing of my photo-dealer) for around 100.

Now my questions:
- What are beside of the # of pixels the disadvantages of the the D30 compared to the D60 and how important are they
-How big is the disadvanage of having only 3.25 Megapixel
- Do you think it is a good deal to start with the D30 to be able to use my Lenses digitaly and then wait for the new Modell. (My dealer told me the new model that will replace the D60 will be coming out this year (so much for the rumors)

Thanks in advance
Simon

#2 tshepherd

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 05:22 AM

If I'm reading this right, you're saying pay about $100 for a used D30 or $2400 for a new D60? If that's the case, you might want to go with the D30 for a while, and spend some money on some decent lenses.

Realistically, there's not many differences between the D30 and D60 other than the pixel count. Many people referred to the D60 as a "spiffing up" of the D30, a stop-gap temporary product, which seems based on it's short life to be accurate.

If your goal is to be able to print some very nice 4x6, 5x7, or maybe even 8x10s, then you shouldn't have a big issue with getting the D30. Anything much larger than that is going to start to lose quality pretty quick, but you've got to weigh how often you're really going to print anything that big anyway.

Another thing to consider is that even if the Dwhatever replacement is announced in March as rumored, it likely won't come out until April or May, and then demand will be huge for a few months following. Realistically, it might be August or September before the camera is easily obtainable. In that time, you could have spent a lot of time with the D30 getting the basics down (composition, exposure, etc) and upgrade IF you feel that you would benefit from whatever is available.

At that point, you could probably sell your D30 for more than you paid for it.

One other thing to consider though, it's not clear what body the D60 replacement will use, so you may need a new housing if you buy either the 30 or the 60 and want to upgrade down the line.

Just my $0.02
Tom

#3 Simon K.

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 05:54 AM

If I'm reading this right, you're saying pay about $100 for a used D30 or $2400 for a new D60? If that's the case, you might want to go with the D30 for a while, and spend some money on some decent lenses.


oops that was a typo i mean 1000 but this is still ok. i seen today a 1,5 year old D30 on ebay at 1400 with 2 days bidding left. So this would still be a good deal.

#4 tshepherd

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 06:01 AM

That makes the decision marginally more difficult, but the fact remains, the D30 is still a decent camera. Think of it this way, you could buy the D60, or buy the D30 and a Canon 50mm macro, Canon 28-135 IS, and Sigma 14mm.

#5 marriard

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 08:30 AM

That makes the decision marginally more difficult, but the fact remains, the D30 is still a decent camera.  Think of it this way, you could buy the D60, or buy the D30 and a Canon 50mm macro, Canon 28-135 IS, and Sigma 14mm.

I have to agree - since they are discontinuing the D60, if you wanted to buy something right now for those prices I wouldbe going with the D30 and waiting to see where Canon goes (as I am not sure they really know themselves).

M

#6 james

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 08:47 AM

I agree with Paul here to - to a point. Compare this purchase to a laptop for a sec. I know it's not a good comparison but it will illustrate some points.

When you buy a laptop, the advice is always "buy the best you can afford." I don't know many people that buy a laptop that's 1/2 the speed so that they can save $1,000.

Ok, with that said, a laptop doesn't need a housing...:-) The D30/D60 does. It also needs lenses.

So, my opinion is that if you NEVER plan to use your photo setup for print or editorial work, then get the D30. If there is a chance, then spend the extra $$ and get the D60. They both fit in the same housings... If the $$$ is the breaking point for you getting the D60, then I advise you wait.

Canon and Nikon are both at a turning point right now.

1) They either stay with the APS sized sensors and make special "Digital" lenses, or

2) They go to full frame sensors and keep their 35mm lenses in the spotlight.

My guess is that since Canon and Nikon are primarily lens manufacturers, they will go w/ route #1. Nikon is probably laughing all the way to the bank. Their DSLR users will have to buy both D-TTL flashes and Digital lenses $$$$$

Cheers
James
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#7 tshepherd

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 09:02 AM

Another school of thought is "don't buy all the bells and whistles if you don't need them", which ties into the idea of weighing what you're going to do with the images. I don't necessarily subscribe to this school of thought, but my parents did :). I've got a D60 now, and haven't printed anything larger than an 8x10, but I bought it because I *did* want the ability to go larger than that if the occassion arose. It really does all boil down to what do you want to do with your images.

Canon and Nikon are certainly at a turning point. From all indications, Nikon is leaning towards sticking with smaller sensors, especially with the advent of the new "digital" lenses.

Canon may be another story. They've got the full-frame sensor now, so they could theoretically standardize on all FF sensors, and just tier their camera offerings based on the same features that differentiate their film bodies. Hard to say though, because the cost of the FF sensor might preclude them offering a low(er)-end offering for around $2000. Who knows though, it's all speculation at this point. Go look at dpreview.com and check out the rumor mill in full tilt over the D60 discontinuation.

#8 Simon K.

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 12:04 PM

To make my decission base more understandable:

I already own some nice lenses because I use EOS cameras for about 10 years, but on the surface only. At the moment I use a Powershoot S40 for UW.

My Point is if it is wise, to buy a camera for 2400 $/ if i don't know if i can get one with 35mm full size sensor for 3000$/ in a few month. But I would like to use a digital SLR now. I think I wont buy a housing for it right away and use my trusted S40 for UW once again in march when my next diving trip is scheduled.

Before June when I hope to go to the Red Sea with Bob. there will be hopefully more information about the new camera so I know if I can use the same housing and if it is worth to wait for it. then I can decide if I wait or if I buy the housing and upgrade on a D60 or the new camera later.

An additional pro for the D30 deal is, that I can hope to ebay it away without big loss or even with a small profit in a few month.

At the moment I won't go bigger than 20x30 cm for which 3,25 Mpx is perfectly ok but I want have the posibillity later. But in my planning the D30 would be only a "temporary solution".

If Canon goes for "Digital Lenses" and away from full size sensors. I'll try to grab a used 1Ds and will use it for the next 5 years al last. But it would be incredibly stupid of them, because in the moment I can't use my lenses anymore I'm free to walk away from Canon because I have to buy new lenses anyway.Maybe I wouldn't but I would have the choice again.

Simon

#9 Cybergoldfish

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 02:35 PM

If Canon goes for "Digital Lenses" and away from full size sensors.

It will be cold day in Hell should this ever happen...

Now a useable practical 35mm chip has arrived every future DSLR will have one if it wants to compete. The fictional price presently prescribed by the marketing crew will drop by 60% within the next 2 years.

#10 tshepherd

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Posted 15 January 2003 - 03:54 PM

I hope you're right on this one. I'd love to see Canon go with a full line of full frame sensors starting somewhere around the D60 pricepoint. That would kick butt...

#11 wetpixel

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Posted 17 January 2003 - 09:49 AM

If you are printing your images, I'd go with the D60. The 3MP to 6MP jump is quite significant. I just printed a batch of 13x19" light-jet prints for a show in San Diego next month, and they all look fantastic. There are a few D30 images in the group (sharpened, stair-interpolated up and sharpened again), and they look fairly good as well, but... well, the difference is obvious.

If you're primarily shooting for the web, or for smaller prints, the D30 will be more than adequate.

One thing to note about the two cameras: The D60's buffer flushing mechanism has been improved so it writes as you shoot. With the D30, if you fill the buffer, you have to wait the 20 seconds until it flushes completely before you can shoot again. Also, it can be hard to see settings on the D30 at night because the top LCD doesn't illuminate itself.

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