Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Shark depletion


  • Please log in to reply
47 replies to this topic

#1 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 23 January 2003 - 02:49 PM

The depletion of sharks is not only a travesty but a crime against nature.
Certain countries are still condoning the mass slaughter of millions of sharks per year to supply the Hong Kong Shark fin trade - This has to stop or Sharks will not be around for our children to enjoy.

Please get involved in this and if you feel strongly enough post your thoughts too.

Follow the links for an educational tour around the facts and implications of shark finning...

<a href='http://www.sharktrust.org' target='_blank'>Sign up at Sharktrust</a>

Full Factual Article <a href='http://wetpixel.com/forums/index.php?act=ST&f=14&t=1051' target='_blank'>Here</a>

JAW'S - The author Peter Benchley takes on the <a href='http://www.divernet.com/news/items/jaws040900.htm' target='_blank'>cause</a>

<a href='http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/low/world/asia-pacific/1218771.stm' target='_blank'>SHARK FIN SOUP</a>



<a href='http://dspace.dial.pipex.com/town/close/zg47/finnews.html' target='_blank'>European Ban on shark finning - closer</a>



<a href='http://www.eurosolve.com/charity/spl/intro.html' target='_blank'>SHARK PROTECTION LEAGUE</a>

#2 cmdasia

cmdasia

    Moray Eel

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 94 posts
  • Location:Bangkok, Thailand

Posted 23 January 2003 - 07:52 PM

It is indeed an issue - I have just returned from Burma and after 4 dives on black rock which is "shark city" according to most reports on web sites we saw zero sharks (did see two dead hammerheads on a fishing boat though).

At Burma Banks we saw 2 Silvertips (probably same fish), 2 whitetips (probably same fish) and 3 nurse sharks (2 at 1 meter but one at 2.5 meter). Baiting was employed.

At Shark point we saw one small white tip.

For an area that was considered one of the shark capitals of the area just 4 years ago there is a big change.

This is now, without doubt in my mind, a diving area that should be considered for its outstanding macro life rather than its sharks.

What a great pity

#3 cmdasia

cmdasia

    Moray Eel

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 94 posts
  • Location:Bangkok, Thailand

Posted 23 January 2003 - 08:55 PM

Article in the months divernet.com

"SHARK POPULATIONS DECIMATED BY OVER-FISHING
Researchers from Dalhousie University have found evidence that the number of certain shark species has dramatically reduced in the past 15 years - in the case of hammerheads by up to 90%
The study examined the numbers of sharks logged as caught in fishing fleet logbooks from 1986 to 2000. The only species of shark not suffering a 50%-plus decline in numbers was the mako.
Most at risk appear to be hammerheads, down 90%; great whites and thresher sharks, down 80%; and tiger sharks, down 65%
The findings are reported in the journal Science and decline has been attributed to intense fishing, particularly for tuna and swordfish. The larger species of shark are particularly badly hit because they take a long time to mature and produce relatively few young. Hammerheads tend to congregate in the same areas as tuna and swordfish so are frequently snared on longlines.
Proposals to prevent the extinction of certain shark species include banning fishing during periods of shark migration, and setting aside marine reserves where no fishing can take place. 8 January 2003"

#4 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 23 January 2003 - 10:30 PM

Mistaken identity - indiscriminate fishing techniques used to be the excuse until the Shark Finning industry really took off in the 80's.

Sharks are now fished purposely for their fins the bodies thrown back into the sea still alive.

The Spanish are causing massive depletion in the Atlantic of Blue Sharks especially during migration periods.

I think this statement is very naive to put it down as bycatch.

#5 markh

markh

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Location:Leics, UK

Posted 23 January 2003 - 11:50 PM

Bob, this is indeed extremely worrying. I continually see programmes on the TV proving this macabre act IS going on allover, although more specifically in Asia. What are these governments doing about it. Absolutely F*** all.

It is so infuriating. Until these cretins get off their backsides & step down from their ivory towers and realise that more money can be injected into their countries by protecting the shark rather than feeding the bellies of the mindless morons who lick up to their derogatory, power-driven so called leaders, the situation will not change.

I believe we (UK Government ) have got more justification to interfere with issues like this than the current war, to be, with Saddam. Thats how strongly I feel about this.

Sorry, I'm going off on one. I wish there was more we could do!!

Mark
Dirk Pitt taught me everything!!!!
E10/Titan housing/1 x Sea & Sea 90 Duo

#6 laz217

laz217

    Salty Pirate

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 626 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:N. Palm Beach, FL

Posted 24 January 2003 - 12:07 AM

I agree with Bob. Although indiscriminate fishing has definitely taken its toll on the population of sharks, it's the shark finning industry that seems to be causing so much devastation. Sadly enough, it's not far from home here in the Florida Keys too. There have been sitings of dead shark carcasses with their fins removed even in the sanctuary. And if you think finding that elusive nudibranch is hard, try finding a shark. I've dove hundreds of times in the Keys and can count with both hands the number of times I've seen sharks.

It doesn't help the shark population any that the general public has such little sympathy for this majestic animal and probably considers those who want to protect them nothing more than insane environmentalists but something needs to be done. Maybe its time to take action similar to what the Kenyan game wardens are doing---shoot the poachers on site if necessary. I know my beliefs are drastic but I'm tired of sitting around discussing issues without any resolution while our childrenís environment is decimated by greedy individuals.

Personally, aside from my contributions to environmental organizations that DO SOMETHING, I will be selling my underwater photos/videos soon and will be giving 100% of the profits to such organizations. Aside from this, I try to educate people as much as possible about the ocean and try to get them involved in helping to protect it. As photographers/videographers, I think we have the power to convey these issues best. Get involved--don't just think about photographing the beauty of the ocean... photograph the destruction as well.. The skies the limit on what we can achieve if only we put forth just a tiny bit of our efforts into it. Even a little bit helps! Even if you only reach ten people in your efforts -- that's ten people less in this world who will cause damage and who will hopefully pass on your message.
Lazaro Ruda
Soap box: TheLivingSea.com

#7 markh

markh

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Location:Leics, UK

Posted 24 January 2003 - 12:44 AM

Get involved--don't just think about photographing the beauty of the ocean... photograph the destruction as well..

Laz, this is a very good point. However shocking this may appear it should be encouraged. Pictures tell a thousand words. Many pictures may, just may, crack the shell.

Mark
Dirk Pitt taught me everything!!!!
E10/Titan housing/1 x Sea & Sea 90 Duo

#8 markh

markh

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Location:Leics, UK

Posted 24 January 2003 - 02:01 AM

Another example of deplorable fishermen activity.

"DOLPHINS FACING EXTINCTION FROM 'PAIR TRAWLERS' OFF THE SOUTH-WEST COAST
Concern is increasinging over the number of dead dolphins washed up off Devon and Cornwall, most of which appear to be victims of foreign 'pair trawling' vessels fishing for sea bass.
The RSPCA, Cornish MP Matthew Taylor and local environmentalists have launched a barrage of complaint after increasing numbers of dead dolphins - many showing knife wounds and signs of having been caught in nets - have been washing ashore on the beaches of Devon and Cornwall. 32 bodies came ashore in December, and over 55 dolphin carcasses have been washed up in January so far.
The dolphins are being caught in massive, 2km nets which are slung between two fishing vessels. Most of the trawlers involved in this type of fishing come from France, Holland and Denmark. Once the dolphins stray into the path of the nets there is very little chance of escape.
Attempts to develop an alteration to the nets that would enable the dolphins to escape have so far proved unsuccessful. 23 January 2003"

When this happens in our (UK) waters I believe we have a RIGHT to physically stop this. This makes me SO angry. :angryfire:
Dirk Pitt taught me everything!!!!
E10/Titan housing/1 x Sea & Sea 90 Duo

#9 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 24 January 2003 - 05:28 AM

Some good points Laz thanks. Very disappointed with the response from people who think sharks are great to photograph, but nothing else!

#10 markh

markh

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Location:Leics, UK

Posted 24 January 2003 - 05:40 AM

It IS disappointing Bob. Maybe its a Brit thing. What we do not have we appreciate more!!
Dirk Pitt taught me everything!!!!
E10/Titan housing/1 x Sea & Sea 90 Duo

#11 yahsemtough

yahsemtough

    Great Canadian Mokarran

  • Senior Moderator
  • 3495 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada

Posted 24 January 2003 - 06:41 AM

IMHO I think the problem in general with anything along these lines is that no one does research before going ahead with the fishing etc. It is always a reactionary response if any followed by studies and delays which in some cases can come much too late.

I also think that any show which shows the aggressive behavior of sharks (usually staged) does much more damage. People need to be educated about what sharks are truly like. I have started seeing more shows along this line but, way too many sensationalized shows to cater to the myths.

Look at what happened in Florida. No one reported on what really happened. All we heard was a shark attacked a kid swimming. That will make the headlines.

If I had a nickel for every person who thinks I am nuts about diving with sharks I'd be rich. They all perceive sharks as ruthless, indescriminate killers. As we all know this is truly not the case.

My last two shark expeditions, both lasting 1 week, we were only able to see Great Hammerheads on 1 day on each trip. This is with lots of baiting to get them close.

We have to discourage shows that promote the fabricated aggressive views of sharks. "the top ten aggressive sharks" etc.

Certainly there are sharks with attitude but, there are people that are that way also. If a person shoots another person do we then need to fear all people? Do we then need to assume all people are going to shoot us. Because one may do it does not mean all do.
Todd Mintz
tmintz.com
all photographs posted © Todd C Mintz

#12 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 24 January 2003 - 06:53 AM

Good points too and this is how we positively educate people - non divers too in Seychelles regarding the correct behavioural characteristics of each species of shark.

To breed out the Seychelles attitude of killing even endangered species for money I have augmented educational packages for children even as early as Kindergarden schools through to colleges.

It's just a pity those mindless robots at a certain consulate won't allow me to educate their children too.

BTW I invited Jacky Chan to come and talk about his work in conservation at the 2001 Subios festival in Seychelles - His agent told me that he could not take me up on the offer as it might conflict with his personal food import business...

There's an irony there somewhere!

#13 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 24 January 2003 - 07:20 AM

James can we pin this so it doesn't get pushed back behind the importance of a bag? After all, what's the use of a bag if there's nothing left to photograph except Nudibranch's - cute as they are!

#14 markh

markh

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Location:Leics, UK

Posted 24 January 2003 - 07:28 AM

Good idea bout the pin.
Dirk Pitt taught me everything!!!!
E10/Titan housing/1 x Sea & Sea 90 Duo

#15 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 24 January 2003 - 09:15 AM

Typical market scene

#16 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 24 January 2003 - 06:39 PM

Unborn Shark pups are a favoured food item as the flesh is not yet tainted with urea... Sharks urinate through their skin, and why in the "old days" fisherman threw them back in the sea - The urea also taints any fish stored next to it. Only difference now they remove the dorsal & pectoral fins first!

#17 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 24 January 2003 - 09:23 PM

This is one reason we don't see too many guitar sharks...

#18 markh

markh

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 513 posts
  • Location:Leics, UK

Posted 28 January 2003 - 02:12 AM

Jesus Bob. Those images are shocking. Pictorial evidence of the problem. Were these taken in the Seychelles?

PS still disappointed about the response to this thread. How many members do we have 700+ !!!
Dirk Pitt taught me everything!!!!
E10/Titan housing/1 x Sea & Sea 90 Duo

#19 Cybergoldfish

Cybergoldfish

    Sperm Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1954 posts
  • Location:UK */Seychelles/Singapore
  • Interests:Don't include plankton

Posted 28 January 2003 - 02:31 AM

I too am disappointed with the response. However, it was nice to see 2 people being truthful in their vote.

These were taken on Victoria Market in 2001: Before the shark fishing ban - now it'll take place boat to boat instead!

#20 craig

craig

    Full Moon Rising

  • Super Mod
  • 2826 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 28 January 2003 - 07:11 AM

I can't speak for others, but most serious issues like this can't be distilled neatly into a handful of answers. I didn't respond in the poll because I didn't feel the answers represented me well. By choosing one I wouldn't be contributing they way I would like.

There may be some here who would act if they knew of something that could make a difference. If there are programs that can have a positive impact that we should support, educating us is key. It will be tough to fight against those who need food on their table.

There are probably others like me that are skeptical of claims of global devastation to the shark populations. Not trying to refute that claim, but it does a disservice to the real cause when such extreme views are put forth. I think damage to local populations is cause enough to act, and we risk being viewed as extremists when we make such sweeping claims.

Bob, if you know of programs worthy of support in this cause, you can count on my support.
I love it when a plan comes together.
- Col. John "Hannibal" Smith

------
Nikon, Seatool, Nexus, Inon
My Galleries