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Best way to play HiDef on HD TV?


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#1 RebreatherDave

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Posted 22 July 2006 - 11:14 PM

Ok, so I don't think I really want to edit HiDef footage, then download the edited movie it back onto an HD tape, then use my FX1 to play the footage on my HiDef TV. Ugh.

Sony does make a Blue-Ray recorder, and a Blue-Ray separate player, I just hate to buy all that crap just to watch stuff on the HDTV and save wear and tear on the FX1. However I didn't rob the Bling Bank to output this stuff on SD discs to play on an HDTV.

Thoughts?
Inspiration Closed Circuit w/Vision electronics
Sony HDR-FX1 3CCD HiDef
Amphibico Phenom
Amphibico dual 35-50 HID's
whatever other toys I can
accumulate b4 I die

#2 richorn

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 11:38 AM

use a DVI out from the computer to the TV. The computer becomes the player.
Richard

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#3 Nick Hope

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 12:10 PM

The TV has a DVI-in?

#4 richorn

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 12:21 PM

most High Def TV's do... They are starting to switch over to the new HDMI connectors, but to date there is a DVI-i connector on most for digital connection to HDTV receivers, Game consoles, etc.
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#5 Mary Lynn

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 12:22 PM

Just thought I'd post some of the latest info from the Apple DVD Studio Pro Discussion Board regarding playback of HD DVDs on Toshiba's new HD DVD player using regular old red laser discs (DVD-Rs) authored with DVD Studio Pro 4.0 and burned on a Mac SuperDrive.

Apparently, while we can currently author HD DVDs on regular old red laser DVD-Rs using DVDSP 4.0 and burn them on Apple SuperDrives, the menus don't currently work properly, so don't use menus, and encoding using H.264 hasn't produced compatible discs. So, stick to the HDV exported off the timeline in Final Cut Pro in it's source form (HD MPEG-2) and AIFF (48 kHz) for the audio if you want to attain playback on Toshiba's new HD DVD player using DVD-R discs.

The folks who seem to be in the know are recommending that these discs be authored for home use only as it's still very early in the technology, DVD-Rs are not going to be the best media to use, and HD DVD authoring media is not yet readily and cheaply available.

That said, we are able to author and burn HD DVDs using good old DVD-Rs on our Macs with SuperDrives using DVD Studio Pro 4.0! (And the results *are* stunning!!)

#6 RebreatherDave

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 04:52 PM

Since Apple announced they were backing the Blue-Ray camp, it will be interesting to see how long it takes for Apple to incorporate a Blue-Ray burner in their desktop computers. Pioneer already makes an internal BR burner, but if they think I am going to pay $1k just for that drive, they're on crack.

When they put a decent priced Blue-Ray burner/player in a Mac after they switch over to quad-core Intel chips, I might upgrade my dual G5 desktop at that point. I should have Sony's cool looking Blue-Ray player by then anyway.

I wonder what the learning curve is on DVDStudioPro.....I have iDVD...

Wags, I agree, using open circuit for fine tuning bouyancy for phot/videography is a real nice feature. As far as scrubber is concerned, changing out sofnolime is no bg deal, and I have a the "temp stick" in mine which is an axial thermistor array that tells me where my heat front int eh scrubber is and I get a graphical display of all that, works awesome.....if I wanted to be oblivious I could completely never look at the scrubber monitor and just wait till I get a red warning LED in my heads up display.... I am getting 8 or so tropical temperature hours out of a $12 or so charge of sofnolime.

Open circuit is less of a hassle though, but I have enough onboard gas to stay down longer than my scrubber life if I actually wanted to. CCR's are sorta like what HiDef 3 chip is to video. However for those that want to actually hear and record the audio of what goes on in a reef, CCR's rock....you can always hear all the clicks and pops and ever the bankga boats scrurrying about above you.
Inspiration Closed Circuit w/Vision electronics
Sony HDR-FX1 3CCD HiDef
Amphibico Phenom
Amphibico dual 35-50 HID's
whatever other toys I can
accumulate b4 I die

#7 wagsy

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 05:31 PM

Dave here is another option.
Z500 Player

Not only can it play 1080i m2t files from normal DVD disks but it has wirelss network so you can play the file on your computer and it will beem it out to it or you can run a LAN cable to it plus more.

AUS company...

Will get a rebreather one day but if I need sounds I just leave the housing on the bottom for abit and go and sit on the boat or jsut hold my breath :D .
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#8 Mary Lynn

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 08:26 PM

Hi Dave,

DVD Studio Pro has a bit of a learning curve, but like Final Cut Studio and Final Cut Pro, there are multiple ways to do most things ranging from basic to advanced. The most difficult part is remembering that you have to set everything. Everything. What the disc will play on start up, where it will jump after that, how long a menu will loop (if you set it to loop) before jumping to wherever you've set it to jump to, all of that. So you have to spend a lot of time checking and rechecking all your settings in the Simulator before you build and format a disc. But it's really logical when you get right down to it. You tell the program exactly what you want the DVD to do (within certain parameters, of course!)

I actually started in DVDSP 1.5 (it's now 4.x) and I first spent a couple of hours going through the tutorial that comes with the program. That got me going, and the rest was just checking in the Help> DVDSP Manual when I needed to know how to do something I'd either forgotten or hadn't yet learned.

The biggest downside is that it costs more, but I enjoy being able to author discs the way I want them to be. I think you'd enjoy the process!

Mary Lynn