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Rechargeable battery advice


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#21 rstark

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Posted 09 July 2003 - 10:08 PM

mAh is Milli Amp Hours and states the storage capcity (run time) a battery will have. The spec you need to be concerned with is the voltage. AA rechargables are usually 1.2 volts. Higher or lower mAh will only affect how long a device will run and does not harm the device in any way. It's kinda like the difference between a D cell and a AA, both are 1.4 volts (alkaline) but the run time is substantially higher in the D cell. Now when it comes to an air tight sealed unit like an underwater strobe I THINK (assume) that the higher the mAh, the more off gassing it will produce but I'm not sure. In any case I'm using 2000mAh batteries in my two 90dx's with out a problem and they have the same case as the 90Auto.

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Robert

#22 Nawk

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Posted 10 July 2003 - 08:02 AM

Thanks Robert,

Voltage is the first thing I consider before I read the Sea & Sea Menu. But do you understand what is this sentence for? "Use only manganese, alkaline, lithium, Ni-MH or nickel-cadmium bateries rated 1000mA or less in this unit."[B] Why it emphasizes current? Do we have choice on this?

:D

#23 james

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Posted 10 July 2003 - 08:16 AM

I think that is a typographical error. Should read mAh.

I also don't agree with them. You can't even BUY 1000 mAh batteries anymore. Jeeze.

Everyone I know uses at least 1,600 now and has not had any problems.

Cheers
James
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#24 rstark

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Posted 10 July 2003 - 09:14 AM

But do you understand what is this sentence for? "Use only manganese, alkaline, lithium, Ni-MH or nickel-cadmium bateries rated 1000mA or less in this unit."[B] Why it emphasizes current?  Do we have choice on this?

I think this is a CYA because the higher rated batteries produce more gas build up and they don't want that becoming a cause of a flood. I really don't think this is an issue or Ike would be saying the same thing, and he's not.

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Robert

#25 Nawk

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Posted 10 July 2003 - 09:25 AM

Robert,

In this case, I gotta get out to look for some >2000mAh NiMH batteries. Thanks!

Nawk

#26 rstark

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Posted 10 July 2003 - 09:25 PM

2200mAh are the latest and greatest but my problem now is with the run time of my CP5000. Thomas Distributing

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Robert

#27 MrFish

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Posted 17 July 2003 - 05:28 AM

Has anyone tried the GP 3500mAh c cell batteries?

http://www.batteries..._HP11___15.html

Seems a very high rating. Would such a high rating effect how the re-cycle time in a strobe?
Dave Hopson
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#28 rstark

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Posted 17 July 2003 - 07:29 AM

I have a set I used to use in my Ike AI strobes. 3500 mAh for a C cell is not high. They range from 3000-5000mAh. The larger the battery the more capacity (mAh) it will hold. Again, this is not voltage it is capacity (run time). For example, D cells range from 4000-11000mAh. As for recycle time, I'm not sure if the quality of the battery has anything to do with this but the higher mAh rating will not.

________
Robert

#29 Frogman

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Posted 11 December 2003 - 06:23 AM

Has anyone tried the Uniross 2300ah AA's with the 2hr sprint charger. Costs around 27 here

Cheers

#30 2mike

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Posted 14 December 2003 - 06:53 PM

Hi all,

any one up on the skinny about the differences between lightweight rechargers, such as the ipowerus FC402 (110/240V) and the much (4x?) heavier chargers, often requiriing an ac adapter and often single input voltage?

2mike
it arrived! now waiting for the housing etc...

#31 wetpixel

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Posted 20 January 2004 - 06:54 PM

FYI, there is another thread (locked now) in the slr forum:

http://wetpixel.com/...?showtopic=4269
Eric Cheng - Administrator, Wetpixel -

#32 woody

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Posted 18 February 2004 - 06:51 AM

Thanks Eric!!! You're the greatest ;)

By the way - the site is looking absolutely fabulous!

Woody

(sorry, posted this in the wrong place, but I can;t find a way to delete it)

#33 scottyb

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 06:51 AM

I'm replacing all my AA's (24) for an upcoming trip. There once was a link to a comparison chart of the different brands and their performance. I haven't been able to find it. My 1st thought is either Maha's or Ansmann's from Thomas Dist.

Also, has anyone tried the newer 2500+ mAh batteries? My old ones were 1800's.

#34 JohnA

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 05:14 PM

"Also, has anyone tried the newer 2500+ mAh batteries? My old ones were 1800's."


I can see how higher mAh batteries would off gas more. I'm wondering if you wait a day after charging before putting them in the strobe if that helps things. I think the newer strobes can handle it, however the older ones don't, so they advise against the NiMh. I once had a strobe flood and I recall that the batteries were still warm when I put them in before hand. I see there are now 2700 AA's available, and I was wondering how much extra risk is involved?? Thanks- John

#35 Deep6

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 09:14 AM

"Also, has anyone tried the newer 2500+ mAh batteries? My old ones were 1800's."


I can see how higher mAh batteries would off gas more. I'm wondering if you wait a day after charging before putting them in the strobe if that helps things. I think the newer strobes can handle it, however the older ones don't, so they advise against the NiMh. I once had a strobe flood and I recall that the batteries were still warm when I put them in before hand. I see there are now 2700 AA's available, and I was wondering how much extra risk is involved?? Thanks- John


I have used 2.7 Ah NiMH in my Inon Z-240s (type II) and Nikon SB800 strobes for several years now without incident.
Bob

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#36 eyu

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 04:13 PM

I too use 2700 mAh batteries in my Inon Z-240s (type 1 & 2) for the last few years without any problems and I change batteries after two dives to a fresh set. I also use a pulse tester to check my batteries before each trip to ensure 100% capacity.

Elmer

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#37 AndreSmith

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 05:31 PM

I have been using these PowerEx http://www.mahaenerg...p?idproduct=352 chargers and 2700mAh batteries http://www.mahaenerg...p?idproduct=415 with my Sea and Sea strobes for the past two years. Have been performing flawlessly. Lightweight and very easy to travel with.

#38 Deep6

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 07:26 PM

I too use 2700 mAh batteries in my Inon Z-240s (type 1 & 2) for the last few years without any problems and I change batteries after two dives to a fresh set. I also use a pulse tester to check my batteries before each trip to ensure 100% capacity.

Elmer


We are so on the same page Elmer.
Bob

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#39 eyu

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Posted 14 August 2009 - 01:17 PM

It is funny how these NiMH batteries lose their capacity after sitting around for a few months. With the pulse tester I am assured of a good set of batteries for the trip.

Elmer

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#40 JohnA

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 06:51 PM

pulse tester? as opposed to a volt meter?
-J