Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Shooting Macro and Extreme Macro


  • Please log in to reply
41 replies to this topic

#1 CamDiver

CamDiver

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indonesia
  • Interests:Filming and documentary production. Beach and surf photography. Family time, isolated beaches and walking the dog.

Posted 19 July 2007 - 12:16 AM

Well I guess it was long overdue,

I've often been asked about my filming techniques when it comes to shooting close and extreme macro. You can see that I live in Palau so I get to dive with the big stuff on a daily basis. I do actually prefer to shoot the small stuff but its the 'Mega Fauna' footage that pays the bills. Plus with offering a dive filming service here its so much easier to put someone on a reef hook, throw in a few sharks and 'Bob's yer Uncle' you've got a sale. So I make a living doing the dailies here in Palau and composing imagery with divers, sharks, wrecks and the infamous Jellyfish Lake. Like I said, I do prefer macro so it puts me in a bit of a quandary when there is so much Ocean around me but no time to go hunting through the muck for something the size of a postage stamp.

To get to the 'meat and veg' of this thread, I've just come back from Lembeh and Bali and had a complete splurge on getting my 'Macro Fix'. In a place like Lembeh I was in heaven. If you haven't been and are a 'Macro Nut' like me then you have to go when you can. Before you do though you'll need to take a closer look at the equipment you will need in order to get the very best out of your trip. So read on as I've put together this little "Macronauts Survival Guide".

Ok so to start with lets take it for granted that we have our camera and housing of choice. With so many of the newer housings on the market the manufacturers produce their wares with very little if any tolerances of great distance between the camera lens and whatever 'super dooper' lenses they are offering their clients. Whether thats whopping Super Wide Ports (SWP's), a la Fathoms SWP44 or internal Macro flip filters. The majority of the manufacturers take into consideration the full optical range of the camera and their product when creating their specific macro or wide lens options but unfortunately there are also those who don't.

OK, so I'm old school, I like to use cameras built by camera manufacturers, I like to use housings built by housing manufacturers, I like to use HDV Tapes meant for HDV cameras etc etc, you get my drift. In that same reasoning I prefer to use optics produced by those companies who specialize in the production of high grade optical lenses. For macro applications I find that the best solution in this field are the achromatic diopters.

Achromatic Diopters:
For maximum magnification and image clarity, these diopters give your lenses more close-up range, while preserving zoom capabilities. I use Century achromatic diopters and consider them essential whenever I need to focus tightly on a small object. Two or more diopters can be stacked on the front of the lens for even greater magnification. These tend to be a bit expensive as they are multi element lenses. The Century diopters for the Z1 have an 18mm / 3/4" profile so space is obviously a requirement between the camera and the inside element of your housing port.

If you can, measure the distance between the camera and the port to find out whether or not you will have the option to use these diopters. If shooting Macro will figure greatly in your filming exploits I suggest that you request that information from the housing manufacturers before parting with a bundle of cash!

Edge-to-Edge Sharpness:
If you are on a budget you can also use single element diopters which also permit focusing at close camera-to-subject distances. However there is a trade off when using these screw in lenses. Image magnification comes at the expense of image clarity. The distorted edge of the image attained when using these filters, almost like a vignetting is called chromatic aberration. Here's the Wiki on Chromatic Aberration.

A Range of Sizes and Magnifications:
Available in 86mm threaded +1.6, +2.0 or +2.6 strengths with 82mm to 86mm step-up / down rings for your HVX200. For the FX1 / Z1 there are 72mm threaded +2.0 or +3.5 strengths with step-up / down rings for lens fronts with diameters of 62mm & 67mm.

Dome Port or Flat Port?
Again this is down to the individual. You're gonna hear some people say that they shoot macro through their dome port with no problems. It's a regular understanding amongst your everyday "Macronuts" that in order to get the absolute best from your system you are best off using a flat port. Its all to do with the physics and relationships involved between flat and curved surfaces of optics. I'm sure there's someone out there with a few more brain cells than me who can explain it better!! How about it DeanB? Bwahahahaha!! Anyway, I suggest you use a flat port.

Lighting:
OK, so here's one of the bones of contention. What makes good lighting? Is it the wattage? Is it what is termed as the CRI? Is it the Lumens? or is it the Kelvin temperature?

The Wattage characteristic of a lighting system is what used to attract me to select my lighting components. Its true, I have a very serious system with my current option but get away from the 'Bigger is Best" mentality. Unless of course you're a Blond from Essex and make a habit of dating the guy with a 'limp'! Higher wattage models, like my 250w monsters, have a sometimes noticeable effect of the wildlife. I have to use the very edge of my light heads, the periphery of the light beam, in order to shoot macro at the moment. If I didn't take that measure it would be a toss up as to whether I would barbeque my subject or they would at least be agile enough to get away with only superficial burns!! The lights I have are also used for wide angle composition shooting. With this past trip experience I will now be hunting around for something in the 24 to 35w range for future macro shoots. I'm not afraid to admit that I'm also still learning. With too much wattage power you have to manually close the iris to reduce the amount of light entering the camera in order to get a clear and colorful picture. At times with the big rig I was having to close down so much that I was starting to loose the color saturation of the subjects. Bare that in mind.

Color Rendering Index, sometimes called Color Rendition Index, is a measure of the ability of a light source to reproduce the colors of various objects being lit by, in this case, your video lights. Measured on a sliding scale of 0 to 100% with 0 being bad and 100 being perfect. Take a look at the lighting models you are thinking about purchasing. Whether they are HID (High Intensity Discharge), Halogen, Xenon or HMI. Each one of these lighting models have their CRI characteristic. I'm pretty sure, don't quote me, that HMI for example is 85% whereas Xenophot is closer to 95%. Obviously the closer you come to perfection with regards to CRI the more you'll be spending. Halcyon and Nuytco have now produced 200w diver portable HMI units with a price tag of around $6000 each!! Ouch.

The lumens, apart from being an undiscovered headhunting tribe from the deepest confines of Alabama, are a characteristic measure of the power of a light source. It's often implied that the light power emitted from a single burning candle is equal to 1 lumen, some people also call this candle power, I may be mistaken on that so, again, don't quote me. If you really wanna get brainwashed take a look at the Wiki definition!!

The kelvin temperature factor of a light source however is one characteristic that you should really consider carefully. The way I normally break this down is that any given kelvin character of a light gives a direct idea of the color spectrum that particular light system is optimum for. Halogen, for example, tends to be the minimum standard of lighting for underwater video and is classified with a kelvin temperature of around 3500 degrees. At this temperature the light from a halogen source tends to allow better collection of the Red and Yellow range of the color spectrum. In the middle of the scale we have Xenon and HMI lighting which normally bridge the 4500 to 5400 degrees kelvin spectrum and give a very nice rendition of most colors. Reds can be a bit muted but not hugely noticeably so. At the top end of the scale some HID units throw out a whackingly high 6000 degrees which translates to a rather bluish tone to their light field. Whilst these seem to be the favorable light choice of the moment it is sometimes required to white balance the camera on an off white slate to get back the Reds and Yellows. Make of that what you will.

Other factors of lighting are the beam spread. In video you want the beam to be as wide as possible, nicely diffused and with no annoying 'hot spots'. Hot Spots are areas of the light which have a much noticeably higher intensity than other areas. These only go to washing out your images. A reasonable angle for lighting is anywhere between 80 and 110 degrees, there are some units out there with up to 180 degrees.

To summarize for lighting: I would suggest for good macro filming you should be looking at something between 24 to 35w, having a CRI of somewhere greater than around 80%, a kelvin characteristic of around 4500 and a beam spread of somewhere close to 90 degrees, Oh and a price tag south of $6k!! :D

OK, so now we're set, Camera?, check, Housing?, check, Diopters either achromatic or single element? check. Woo Hooo, lets go.....Hold on! What about Stability?

Let's face it, We're going to be at very close distance to our subjects, were going to be magnifying our telephoto ability by X number of times (based on the factor of the diopter you've got fitted) so we've got to have good stability. Buoyancy with wide angle is one thing, stability with macro is a much less forgiving beast. There are not that many companies out there producing underwater tripods so you may have to get a bit experimental and work on building something that works. For an old Hi8 system I used to film with I got some massive hose clamps from a hardware store, I had attached four of those universal base mounts for articulated flash arms to a short length of steel and then, two at the lower front end and two at the lower back end of an old Ikelite housing just hose clamped the things in place and then used multi elements of articulated arms to set a stable filming position. Get a tripod, or bastardize one, its a lot easier!! If you do have a housing from a manufacturer who also produces underwater tripods I would suggest strongly that you get one if you can, you're images will benefit greatly. At the end of the day that's what its all about anyway. Mind you, having a tripod also means that you don't have to worry about bumping into old friends and new acquaintances whilst on dive vacations and drinking until the early hours. The tripod is a godsend whilst a bout of the 'shakes' or 'DT's' are a pain in the butt.

So you're all set. The only thing that remains is to go out there and get the images.......Aw, c'mon.......you don't expect me to tell you how to do that as well do you? :angry:

Hope this helps,
Cheers,
Mark.
P.S Check out my flickr page (link below) as I'll be constantly adding new video stills from this recent trip.

The Sharks of the Forgotten Islands

- A Natural History Documentary -


#2 UWPhotoTech

UWPhotoTech

    Eagle Ray

  • Industry
  • PipPipPip
  • 352 posts
  • Location:Derry, NH

Posted 19 July 2007 - 08:41 AM

Phew I'm glad I don't live anywhere near Alabama!! :D

But I'll be sure to keep my eye for the "Blonde from Essex" despite my lack of a limp!!

On the other hand thanks for the great information!

Lee

:angry:
Underwater Photo-Tech, Derry, NH
Phone: 603-432-1997, Web: www.uwphoto.com

#3 CamDiver

CamDiver

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indonesia
  • Interests:Filming and documentary production. Beach and surf photography. Family time, isolated beaches and walking the dog.

Posted 19 July 2007 - 03:14 PM

Hey Lee,
No problem. I will add / edit to this information to carry the 'lesson' on at a later date. In the middle of a tedious archiving session, hence the time to sit down and write endless reams of information.

Thanks,
Mark.

The Sharks of the Forgotten Islands

- A Natural History Documentary -


#4 wagsy

wagsy

    Blue Whale

  • Senior Moderator
  • 3845 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cairns, Queensland.
  • Interests:Sewing and Knitting......no diving of course :-)

Posted 19 July 2007 - 05:31 PM

Mark that was huge.
That would of took me all week to type that many letters of the alphabet. :D
Amphibico Phenom & EVO PRO & Navigator 900
Share Your Underwater Videos www.hdvunderwater.com | www.flykam.com.au | www.reeftorainforest.com.au

#5 CamDiver

CamDiver

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indonesia
  • Interests:Filming and documentary production. Beach and surf photography. Family time, isolated beaches and walking the dog.

Posted 19 July 2007 - 11:07 PM

Mark that was huge......

Hmmmm, I'm sure I've heard that said before ......... :D

With this archiving like a dervish at the moment I've got plenty of time. Remember a while back I mentioned about people getting their names "out there"? Well in the past few days I've been scouring the web and there are masses of places where you can do just that, for free! Always a good thing.

Check out my new blog when you have the time.

Back to the archiving,
Cheers,
Mark.

The Sharks of the Forgotten Islands

- A Natural History Documentary -


#6 ronscuba

ronscuba

    Eagle Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 365 posts

Posted 27 July 2007 - 04:35 AM

Great post.

I used a cheap diopter on my TRV900. It worked great for macro. I'll have to see how the Gates flip dioter works on my FX7. I like the idea of being able to flip it in/out so I can shoot macro with diopter/lights, but then flip it out to shoot wide no lights with my filter.

The extra resolution of HD may push me towards an achromatic diopter like you, but I guess I'll lose the ability to flip in/out.

Interesting information on lights. The Greenforce sound great, but I wonder why they discontiued their 35watt lamp. Right now they offer a 10watt and 50watt lamp. The 35 watt lamps would be great for macro.

#7 CamDiver

CamDiver

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indonesia
  • Interests:Filming and documentary production. Beach and surf photography. Family time, isolated beaches and walking the dog.

Posted 27 July 2007 - 03:03 PM

Hi ronscuba,
Glad you appreciate the information here. Macro can be such a rewarding shooting genre that all attention is obviously on the image detail. I think that kind of clarity can only be achieved with achromatic diopters. They are expensive though so are more of a luxury item over the more economic and readily available close up filters / diopters.

Depends on the lights. Was the discontinued light a 35w HID or Halogen? If it was Halogen then the 10w HID would give out the same kind of power albeit at a higher kelvin factor. White balancing to recuperate any lost Red's or Yellows would then be a factor for the user.

Cheers,
Mark.

The Sharks of the Forgotten Islands

- A Natural History Documentary -


#8 ronscuba

ronscuba

    Eagle Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 365 posts

Posted 27 July 2007 - 03:09 PM

Greenforce had a Squid 100 which was a 30watt HID. But it has been discontinued and replaced with the 250. Here is one of their old brochures.


Squid100

#9 jonny shaw

jonny shaw

    Orca

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1315 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 27 July 2007 - 09:22 PM

Mark,
Great piece of information, how ever to pick your brains further. I have been trying to get some real close up shots of Seahorses on an ocean beach net. Now the problem is the netting moves so tripod isn't solving the problem as both camera and subject need to move. The shots look fine when I'm a bit wider but do you have any tips for some serious close up stuff?

I'm sure it's just practise but any advice would be great.

Jon

www.ginclearfilm.com
www.facebook.com/ginclearfilm
GATES DEEP EPIC Based in Sydney


#10 CamDiver

CamDiver

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indonesia
  • Interests:Filming and documentary production. Beach and surf photography. Family time, isolated beaches and walking the dog.

Posted 28 July 2007 - 03:02 PM

Hi Jon,
I think you have a few options open to you.

1) Get a diopter on the cam, get close and stay on auto focus. With a reduced Depth of Field (DoF) you'll have to be close to the object which should reduce noticeable 'searching' by the camera's auto focus function. This way rather than focusing on an exact distance the camera will give you more leeway for capturing the movement within the set DoF.

2) Get in close with a diopter and set manual focus. Lots of work to perfect this but very pleasing when you 'nail it'. You'll have to practice a lot with using either the Focus Near / Far electronics or the manual focusing ring, depending on your housing set up.

3) A third option, so long as it has no direct physical detriment to the animal, is to dive with a buddy and have the buddy steady the netting, to reduce the amount of movement of the sea horse etc.

Maybe one of these will help.

To get the best from macro shooting you also need to have manual control over your iris and shutter speed, without those you will be frustrated if you don't get the same results as the images you have in your mind, all other factors relative i.e lighting etc. Don't forget to set your Iris manually to nail the DoF.

Cheers,
Mark.

The Sharks of the Forgotten Islands

- A Natural History Documentary -


#11 jonny shaw

jonny shaw

    Orca

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1315 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 28 July 2007 - 06:52 PM

Thanks Mark, great things to try...

Regarding Diopters what strength? +2, +3 or +4

Jon

www.ginclearfilm.com
www.facebook.com/ginclearfilm
GATES DEEP EPIC Based in Sydney


#12 CamDiver

CamDiver

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indonesia
  • Interests:Filming and documentary production. Beach and surf photography. Family time, isolated beaches and walking the dog.

Posted 28 July 2007 - 08:34 PM

Regarding diopters it depends on the size of your subject, what distance you feel you can get to them and your ability to hold the cam steady at that given magnification.

If you can use some kind of support / tripod then thats half the battle. Once you get proficient and steady images you can then double up on the diopters. This is especially beneficial if you want to get your establishing shots and then close in for Eye, Fin, Texture or Tail shots etc.

If you do try doubling up on diopters make sure you put the highest magnification element onto your camera first, i.e if you want to try a +4 and then a +2 you should put the +4 on the cam and then the +2 into the +4.

Good luck with testing. Try it 'dry' first. Best to get proficient on land with all the controls and handling before hitting the wet stuff.

Cheers,
Mark.

The Sharks of the Forgotten Islands

- A Natural History Documentary -


#13 jonny shaw

jonny shaw

    Orca

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1315 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 28 July 2007 - 08:58 PM

Cool,

Maybe I'll break out the lego figures put some dive gear on and crawl about on the floor trying not to freek out my girlfriend...


Jon

www.ginclearfilm.com
www.facebook.com/ginclearfilm
GATES DEEP EPIC Based in Sydney


#14 CamDiver

CamDiver

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indonesia
  • Interests:Filming and documentary production. Beach and surf photography. Family time, isolated beaches and walking the dog.

Posted 28 July 2007 - 09:35 PM

yeah, urrmmmm, thats my, uh, technique too !!

Cheers,
Mark.

The Sharks of the Forgotten Islands

- A Natural History Documentary -


#15 jonny shaw

jonny shaw

    Orca

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1315 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney

Posted 29 July 2007 - 11:34 PM

Been out shooting again today and I am getting slightly better, wish I had somewhere to post footage so you all could laugh at my shaky work...It can be soooooooo fustrating :D wanting to get super close in but everything is bloody moving!!!!! Maybe I'll invest in Shake and cheat!!!
But anyway it is interesting that I never have been a 'macro' kinda guy, in fact I thought that macro dudes were a a bit nerdy (even more than most of us) and now I am starting to understand their fascination. It's bloody hard to nail a great macro shot, when compared to shooting pelagics, which is what I normally do.

Jon

www.ginclearfilm.com
www.facebook.com/ginclearfilm
GATES DEEP EPIC Based in Sydney


#16 CamDiver

CamDiver

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1103 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indonesia
  • Interests:Filming and documentary production. Beach and surf photography. Family time, isolated beaches and walking the dog.

Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:43 PM

Jon,
I'd suggest you start out on inanimate objects like corals or structures etc. Go for textures and shapes. Get used to getting in close and working the camera. Slowly build up to movements and smaller life forms. Work up to tracking and maintaining a manually focused sea horse in a force 3 Typhoon surge in center frame !!

If you start on the hard stuff to begin with it may burn you out before the bug bites.

Nerds are gonna inherit the planet so sign up now. Any numbskull can film a shark, that don't take brains like what I got ............ ?

Cheers,
Mark.

The Sharks of the Forgotten Islands

- A Natural History Documentary -


#17 Drew

Drew

    The Controller

  • Video Expert
  • 10645 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:GPS is not reliable in South East Asian seas

Posted 02 August 2007 - 12:08 AM

Thanks for that Mark.
There are a few more considerations to macro shooting which I'll add to your post:

The Wattage characteristic of a lighting system is what used to attract me to select my lighting components. Its true, I have a very serious system with my current option but get away from the 'Bigger is Best" mentality.... I would barbeque my subject or they would at least be agile enough to get away with only superficial burns!! The lights I have are also used for wide angle composition shooting...With too much wattage power you have to manually close the iris to reduce the amount of light entering the camera in order to get a clear and colorful picture. At times with the big rig I was having to close down so much that I was starting to loose the color saturation of the subjects. Bare that in mind.

Too much light does affect marine life. I've seen pygmy seahorses faint or die from intense light of strobes and video lights. Remember also closing down the exposure brings out lens diffraction on the video camera itself. I would suggest limiting the exposure to 1 stop before max (Sony = f11, Canon= f9.8) to minimize diffraction on top of the diopter's own distortion.

Color Rendering Index, sometimes called Color Rendition Index, is a measure of the ability of a light source to reproduce the colors of various objects being lit by, in this case, your video lights. Measured on a sliding scale of 0 to 100% with 0 being bad and 100 being perfect. Take a look at the lighting models you are thinking about purchasing. Whether they are HID (High Intensity Discharge), Halogen, Xenon or HMI. Each one of these lighting models have their CRI characteristic. I'm pretty sure, don't quote me, that HMI for example is 85% whereas Xenophot is closer to 95%.

CRI for halogen/Xenophots is 100. HID/Xenon is around 65-70 depending on model and HMI is 92 for the Sylvania models.

The lumens, apart from being an undiscovered headhunting tribe from the deepest confines of Alabama, are a characteristic measure of the power of a light source. It's often implied that the light power emitted from a single burning candle is equal to 1 lumen, some people also call this candle power, I may be mistaken on that so, again, don't quote me. If you really wanna get brainwashed take a look at the Wiki definition!!

1 foot candle= 1 lumen. The real issue is the lumens per watt rating. With halogen, the lumens/watt rating is no hight than 40/watt. HID/HMI can reach 50 for some bulbs, which accounts for its better efficiency.

The kelvin temperature factor of a light source however is one characteristic that you should really consider carefully. The way I normally break this down is that any given kelvin character of a light gives a direct idea of the color spectrum that particular light system is optimum for. Halogen, for example, tends to be the minimum standard of lighting for underwater video and is classified with a kelvin temperature of around 3500 degrees. At this temperature the light from a halogen source tends to allow better collection of the Red and Yellow range of the color spectrum. In the middle of the scale we have Xenon and HMI lighting which normally bridge the 4500 to 5400 degrees kelvin spectrum and give a very nice rendition of most colors. Reds can be a bit muted but not hugely noticeably so. At the top end of the scale some HID units throw out a whackingly high 6000 degrees which translates to a rather bluish tone to their light field. Whilst these seem to be the favorable light choice of the moment it is sometimes required to white balance the camera on an off white slate to get back the Reds and Yellows. Make of that what you will.


Halogen is 3200°K. Remember also that you do have to account for the distance vs strength of light in water, which is a natural filter of warmer frequencies. That is why halogen has a less blue fade off background vs HID. The water absorbs it.
It should also be added that halogen allows the power to be varied from 0-100, so it's a more flexible system. You can shoot wide angle at 100% and macro at 25%.

Drew
Moderator
"Journalism is what someone else does not want printed, everything else is public relations."

"I was born not knowing, and have only had a little time to change that here and there.


#18 Jules (Helioxfilm)

Jules (Helioxfilm)

    Eagle Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 391 posts
  • Location:Hungary, Budapest
  • Interests:UW videography, tec diving<br />literature (novels)<br />diplomacy

Posted 02 August 2007 - 11:57 PM

Thanks Mark, great things to try...

Regarding Diopters what strength? +2, +3 or +4

Jon


jonny,

I have a +5 diopter for my Z1, it is too much, it was a wrong decision to buy... I would stay with the +2 or +3.

Edited by Jules (Helioxfilm), 02 August 2007 - 11:57 PM.


#19 wagsy

wagsy

    Blue Whale

  • Senior Moderator
  • 3845 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cairns, Queensland.
  • Interests:Sewing and Knitting......no diving of course :-)

Posted 03 August 2007 - 04:36 AM

I also find that if your video camera has the setting.... to put the anti shake (OIS) on HARD for macro as it tends to lock onto it better.
Amphibico Phenom & EVO PRO & Navigator 900
Share Your Underwater Videos www.hdvunderwater.com | www.flykam.com.au | www.reeftorainforest.com.au

#20 shawnh

shawnh

    Shawk Man

  • Senior Moderator
  • 1398 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Boulder, CO
  • Interests:UW Video, UW Photography Diving, Telemark Skiing, Cycling, Travel

Posted 03 August 2007 - 01:31 PM

Great stuff Mark. I have spent a relatively little time on the macro side. That being said, i have suffered through many of the frustrations of shooting good macro.

The number one hardest thing i contend with is shooting Stable macro footage while not damaging the surrounding reef. I refuse to allow a "little" impact to get my shot....against my religion. So, when filming in places like Raja Ampat (vs black sand Lembeh), I am at a loss to get good stable footage. There is no place to settle down, no good tripod locations or I am shooting on a wall where a tripod is useless.

So, I would be very intrested in ECO-Friendly recommendations for shooting macro.
Canon 5D MII - Aquatica Housing - Sola 4000 Lights - Wahoo HD Monitor & Sony EX1 - Gates EX1 Housing - Fathoms UWA Lens
www.bluespheremedia.com