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Dual Strobe positioning


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#1 shark6047

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 11:41 AM

I'm using 2 YS-110's on a Sea and Sea P&S. I figured I would get decent strobes so when I finally upgrade to DSLR, I can hold off on new strobes for alittle. Anyway my question is this:

I've noticed I have to angle the strobes inward quite a bit. The results are usually good, but I was just wondering, what everyones thoughts were on the matter.

Thanks in advance
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#2 Rocha

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Posted 08 September 2007 - 02:31 PM

You can angle them inwards for best center illumination, and this works for waters in Hawaii, but if you dive in places with some backscatter you will need to ether point them straight or slightly outwards...

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#3 shark6047

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 12:13 PM

Thanks Rocha,
We are heading to Palau this weekend and I've only been using 2 strobes for a short amount of time.
I'll be diving this week to refine my technique prior to the trip.
thanks again
eD
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#4 vkalia

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 10:11 PM

Another factor is how far you keep the strobes from the camera. The further away they are, the more you will have to angle them inwards. A third factor is how far the subject is - the further the subject, the less angling needed.

I typically shoot from very close to the subject, so for me, what works best is keeping the strobes relatively close to the camera (maybe 8-10 inches away from the grips), and angling slightly inwards. Reading the new book by Martin Edge, he recommends the same thing as well.

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#5 tdpriest

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Posted 13 September 2007 - 07:02 AM

I think that you will find that Martin Edge recommends aiming the strobes slightly OUTWARDS, to reduce backscatter.

The key is matching strobes to lenses: with macro, almost any strobe will do, if it's not too big to point in the right direction. With wide-angles the beam angle is critical. I use Inon strobes with diffusors, giving a beam angle of 110 degrees, on arms of at least 20cm length. I think that the beam angle of YS110s is less than this, and that could be a problem.

Here is a similar set-up using Ikelite gear:

2004_33_Truk.jpg

Tim

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#6 MRE

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 12:16 PM

I think that you will find that Martin Edge recommends aiming the strobes slightly OUTWARDS, to reduce backscatter.

The key is matching strobes to lenses: with macro, almost any strobe will do, if it's not too big to point in the right direction. With wide-angles the beam angle is critical. I use Inon strobes with diffusors, giving a beam angle of 110 degrees, on arms of at least 20cm length. I think that the beam angle of YS110s is less than this, and that could be a problem.

Here is a similar set-up using Ikelite gear:

2004_33_Truk.jpg

Tim

B)



Hi Guys

I would do some tests on land in a darkened room. You need to have a sense of the spread of light, which your flashguns emit. For starters position them a similar distance each side of the port but make sure they are behind the port. Start with one gun turned on, shoot the head of a colourful silk (or similar) flower. Try to achieve a black background with a fast shutter and enough aperture for the flash to easily reach the subject. Leave room around the head of the flower so you can check your LCD. Now angle your flash outwards a little at a time, check your histogram and you’ll see the exposure dropping. This indicates that you are finding the edge of your flash beam (no pun intended). My advice is always to learn what one flash will do, then turn the other on and blend them together. In a couple of hours you will have feeling of what one and then a second flash can achieve and in time, which subjects will benefit from dual lighting techniques Good luck

Martin Edge