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#1 Nemo

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Posted 24 April 2002 - 04:35 PM

This is a little off beat but I am wondering if anyone has had to deal with this situation before. In general I have my camera handed down to me or I hang it from a line to retrieve after my entry. However, when diving in the UK (Im going back to Scapa Flow in a few weeks) entries are commonly made on the fly (the boat is not anchored and is moving) and the free board on these boats is 4'+. Not a hard entry but Im worried about the impact on the camera and strobes. I didnt bring the camera on my last trip out so it wasnt an issue. Any thoughts? The camera is a Tetra with 2 DX90s.
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#2 derway

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Posted 24 April 2002 - 07:03 PM

When necessary, you can hang the camera on a drop line, from the boat. Say 15 or 20 feet down.

Then, you can gently lower it through the surface, and retrieve it the same way.

Some people recommend putting in a section of bungee, as a shock buffer, but make sure the main line limits the travel.

I would never jump in, from 4 feet, with my photo gear. I always have it handed down, even when free boating.

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#3 wetpixel

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Posted 25 April 2002 - 12:14 AM

I've had to jump in with my UK Germany/Dual DS125s a few times, and it's been fine. Built like a tank! :)

Back rolls are preferable to giant strides off of high boats, of course. :)
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#4 Nemo

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Posted 25 April 2002 - 02:20 AM

Thanks for your thoughts. Back rolls with a technical rig (these are deep dives)arent really an option. The hand down is my prefered method too.
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#5 snoack

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Posted 25 April 2002 - 08:37 AM

If you have to jump and there is no way to hand or let down the camera

a) inflate your jacket a bit more that you usually do and try to hold the camera up as high as you can with one hand keeping it above surface (works if the jump isn't very high and if you don't have to go down immedeatly due to current ...)
B) press the housing tightly to your chest, pointing the port inside and protecting it's lower and back side as good as possible with one arm. (this is what i do when i have to jump or back-roll and go down immediately)

Both options leave on hand free to hold your mask and regulator.

Have the camera handed down to you whenever possible ...

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#6 RogerCarlson

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Posted 26 April 2002 - 11:12 PM

when I have to jump in, I try to hold the camera low, and lift it as I go in, so that it goes in slowly, if at all.

One thing you have to be careful of is that you are risking a blast of water before your o-rings have properly seated under pressure. This is worse with some cameras than others. I think most digital housings are pretty good, the o-rings are already pretty well compressed, but it's a concern to think about.

#7 Andi Voeltz

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Posted 29 April 2002 - 01:23 AM

Originally posted by snoack
If you have to jump and there is no way to hand or let down the camera  

B) press the housing tightly to your chest, pointing the port inside and protecting it's lower and back side as good as possible with one arm. (this is what i do when i have to jump or back-roll and go down immediately)

Hi Bine,

I do not know how long Nemo's arms for the 2 DX90s are, but I think he might risk entanglement or crushing a strobe's arm while everything gets pushed towards him. However, I think your method is very suitable for small camera's with no or a small external strobe.

I usually try to hold my rig with two hands on the most crucial parts and then jump without wasting grip capacities on my mask and regulator. But I also have to mention, that I always have a spare mask in my pocket :) But so far I never had to use it... or make any regulator recovery.

About loosing the regulator while jumping in: It occurred only once to me, when I was tossed of the boats nose (very strong waves that day at the Thistlegorm) and therefore unintentionally entered the water from approx. 3 metres above. If you have to sustain such an impact for the first time I bet you'll be hit by surprise and fail to keep your regulator in the mouth. Anyway - with both hands free it is not that difficult to recover it, if you keep calm and follow the "STOP - THINK - ACT" rule. But I think everyone agrees, that you will never plan to make a jump with your camera from the boats nose under such conditions. So generally (to photographers only) I'd like to give the following recommendation: both hands for your rig and tie it! ...it is in many cases the most expensive part of your equipment and also the easiest to loose.

safe dives for all of you :cool: .oOo. Andi

[Edited on 29.4.2002 by andi]
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