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Remote Monitor UW for 1st time


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#1 StephenFrink

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 05:47 AM

While I had done some polecam work with my Seacam e-monitor, yesterday was the first time I tried it underwater.

Used this set-up to let the schooling fish acclimate to the housing, and get properly polarized in front of dome:

KL_JUNE_2008_1119.jpg

Even got myself in the photo, as the cable can be up to 50 meters in length and still trigger the camera. Probably very interesting applications for research and deep water remote applications as camera & monitor can go to to 80 meters. Have to play with it some more.

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Edited by StephenFrink, 28 June 2008 - 08:46 AM.

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#2 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 09:35 AM

Very interesting and impressive. I think Seacam deserve a lot of credit for constantly trying to push forward the capabilities of underwater photographic kit.

I can think of some very interesting uses for this already. Is that also a Seacam tripod. It would be great to have one that could take UW usage. It would be pretty essential with this kit.

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#3 Tom_Kline

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 04:01 PM

Probably very interesting applications for research and deep water remote applications as camera & monitor can go to to 80 meters.


I think that at least some research applications would involve 24h monitoring or may need VCR recording capability. Does the finder camera work in near-darkness and is the video feed compatible with NTSC VCRs?

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Lens focal lengths ranging from 8 to 200mm for UW use. Seacam housings and remote control gear. Seacam 60D, 150D, and 250D, Sea&Sea YS250, and Inon Z220 strobes.

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#4 StephenFrink

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Posted 29 June 2008 - 03:52 AM

Alex asked: "Is that also a Seacam tripod?"

Yes, Alex. Handy little thing as it is very light and takes up hardly any travel space. The three rods that serve as legs unscrew and then all you have is the small semi-sphere that has the ball head adapter. You need to find a flat bit of rubble or sand to set it on, as legs don't telescope like a topside tripod, but nice addition to travel kit.

Picture_1.png

Tom said: "I think that at least some research applications would involve 24h monitoring or may need VCR recording capability. Does the finder camera work in near-darkness and is the video feed compatible with NTSC VCRs?"

I don't know about "near-darkness", but for sure records in very low light according to my admittedly non-scientific observation. As for the video feed, I think so Tom. If you look at the bottom of the monitor in the UW shot you'll see two more ports that are capped off (S6 connectors). One is for a separate remote trigger, in case you don't want to use the button on the monitor to fire the shutter. The other one is a video output designed for video goggles (topside use only). I have to believe that could feed to a VCR just as easily. It seems like a diver could set it up UW, and the video-out cable could lead to a VCR on the surface. Or for that matter, the whole monitor could go to the surface as it works up to 50-meters away from the housing. I'm certainly not an expert in the video end of things, but it seems that would be the case.

Edited by StephenFrink, 29 June 2008 - 04:06 AM.

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#5 divegypsy

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 08:37 PM

Sounds like a very expensive way to take pictures of yourself. Wouldn't a mirror do?

#6 Steve Williams

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 10:18 PM

Wouldn't a mirror do?

Not near as much fun! :P

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