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Black and White Film


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#1 caveman

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Posted 06 July 2003 - 09:05 AM

Black and White Film

I bought some TX 400 film recently expecting nice pictures, but the texture was as rough as the sand on the beach. Not really knowing too much about different types of B/W film, I assume this is intended in the TX 400

Has any one got any advice on what film to use to get a smooth texture, and to get shades of grey rahter than just black or white.

#2 Cybergoldfish

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Posted 06 July 2003 - 12:30 PM

Try and get a good Panchromatic - Fuji, Kodak, Agfa & Ilford.

#3 craig

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Posted 06 July 2003 - 12:40 PM

Wow! Conjoined turtles attached at the rear flippers! How odd that they could survive to maturity.
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#4 Cybergoldfish

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Posted 06 July 2003 - 12:43 PM

Yes, They were photochopped at birth! :D

#5 caveman

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Posted 06 July 2003 - 10:03 PM

Thanks. Will try to look for it, although I am not sure whether it is written on the box that way " Pan chromatic"

#6 JackConnick

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Posted 06 July 2003 - 10:41 PM

Like any film, you trade speed for grain. Smaller grain equals more detail and less contrast.

ASA400 is going to be a lot more grainy than say 125.

Or just go for it and work with the grain to make gritty dramatic images.

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#7 scorpio_fish

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 02:07 AM

TX film provides a higher contrast and more grain.

Try some T-Max film 100 speed. The output quality will also be controlled by the processing lab, so choose a good B&W lab.

Kodak TMax info

I used to use Ilford Pan, but never underwater. It's probably a little too contrasty, but the lack of grain was wonderful.
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#8 caveman

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Posted 08 July 2003 - 05:49 AM

Ooops, accidently got some T400CN . will try the films you recommended real soon.

Thanks

#9 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 09 July 2003 - 12:04 AM

Having, last night, got my sheets of Agfa Scala back (that I took a week or so ago in the Red Sea) I would strongly recommend this film. Its a B&W positive film and is loverley!

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#10 Lndr

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Posted 17 August 2003 - 07:25 PM

Were you shooting Wide or Macro on the Agfa Scala? How did the exposures required compare to regular colour tranperancies?

Also, can you notice the granularity of the 200 ASA ? I found with colour tranperencies projected images are not so bad, but when you scan them the "softness" shows ...