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Digital on the Big Screen


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#1 mattd

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 03:14 AM

I recently tried projecting some digital photos using a colour LCD projector. Now, I wasn't expecting the quality of image you get from a photographic slide, but I was extremely dissapointed with the result. Compared to what I saw on my computer screen, the projected image was grainy with a lot of contrast between light and dark parts of the picture.

The pictures were taken with a CP5000 (5 MP), RAW format, so resolution was at a maximum. The projector I used was a Mitsubishi, about 4 years old.

Has anyone had experience in projecting digital images? Is there any way of getting a half decent picture up on the wall?

#2 jimbo1946

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 04:13 AM

I'm using a Dell 3200, and I love it.

I would recommend the following:

1. Your projector is an older model. Projector technology and durability has improved enormously in the past 3-4 years, not to mention the size and weight going down.

2. For high-resolution digital images, the projector should have 1024 x 768 resolution or better.

3. Check your screen. The type of screen can make a big difference.

Hope this helps. Good luck!
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#3 herbko

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 09:17 AM

There are only two types of projectors: LCD and DLP. LCD projectors have poor contrast. I haven't seen one that's suitable for photos. DLP's are made from Texas Instruments display chips using micro mirrors. It's a much better system, and of course more expensive. The consumer versions has come down to around $2k for an 1024x768 projector. The theater version use multiple chips and can cost as much as a house.
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#4 james

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 09:56 AM

What they said.

In addition you should project a color chart or some photo where you know the color - and do a comparison. Does the color look right? On my projector, I had to turn the red WAY down and the green up a bit.

Only getting 1024 x 768 (like ~.75 megapixels) to project sure is a drag when you're shooting with a 5 or 6 megapixel camera...

HTH
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#5 wetpixel

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 10:09 AM

There are only two types of projectors: LCD and DLP. LCD projectors have poor contrast. I haven't seen one that's suitable for photos. DLP's are made from Texas Instruments display chips using micro mirrors. It's a much better system, and of course more expensive. The consumer versions has come down to around $2k for an 1024x768 projector. The theater version use multiple chips and can cost as much as a  house.

DILA projectors aren't bad, either. I have one that is 1366x1024, and it favorably compares to DLP projectors. I sent it to Los Angeles to have it color calibrated for TV/film, and photos look pretty good projected from it!
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#6 herbko

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 10:26 AM

DILA projectors aren't bad, either. I have one that is 1366x1024, and it favorably compares to DLP projectors.  I sent it to Los Angeles to have it color calibrated for TV/film, and photos look pretty good projected from it!

I haven't seen one of those used for photos before. How much do they cost?
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#7 craig

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 10:57 AM

My Vidikron CRT projector is not too shabby either.
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#8 wetpixel

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Posted 07 July 2003 - 11:52 AM


DILA projectors aren't bad, either. I have one that is 1366x1024, and it favorably compares to DLP projectors.  I sent it to Los Angeles to have it color calibrated for TV/film, and photos look pretty good projected from it!

I haven't seen one of those used for photos before. How much do they cost?

They are expensive, and heavy. :D I'm not sure what they go for now, but my model probably goes for around $10,000.
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#9 jimbo1946

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Posted 08 July 2003 - 03:05 PM

Until my last dive trip, I shot color slide film and showed the photos with a Kodak slide projector. Obviously, when I switched to digital, the Kodak was useless. The Dell projector is expensive, but the prices are coming down to the consumer level (hey, people pay $2000+ every day for big-screen TVs).

Dell just came out with a new model DLP projector for under $1200. It's only 800 x 600, but that's not too bad for the price (but I agree, it's inadequate for 5-6 megapixel photos). Keep in mind that it's kind of like printing a photo bigger than the pixel count warrants. If you put your eyeball right on it, it looks fuzzy, but when you stand back at a normal viewing distance, things look a lot better.

I think that digital projectors will be hot items for awhile. The potential market has barely been tapped, and there's a lot of competitors, so I would think that in a year or two, a good projector should be in the $1000 range.
Jim Chambers
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