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Digital photography as a tool in the hand of science


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#1 hagainativ

hagainativ

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Posted 07 January 2009 - 07:56 AM

Hello!
My name is Hagai Nativ (post #16 in the introduction pinned above) and I'm in the process of collecting matirials to my seminar project on the subject: Digital photography as a tool in the hand of science.
So I want to collect a few methods used sucsessfully at this field.

My primery subject is the time laps method so if you know or have some information/articles about it I'll be glad to recive them.

My mail is: hagainativ@gmail.com

Thanks!

Hagai Nativ - Underwater photographer
www.hagainativ.com
facebook.com/hagainativ.photographer


#2 bvanant

bvanant

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 04:44 PM

Hello!
My name is Hagai Nativ (post #16 in the introduction pinned above) and I'm in the process of collecting matirials to my seminar project on the subject: Digital photography as a tool in the hand of science.
So I want to collect a few methods used sucsessfully at this field.

My primery subject is the time laps method so if you know or have some information/articles about it I'll be glad to recive them.

My mail is: hagainativ@gmail.com

Thanks!

From Morisette in Animal Behavior, 2000

We used time-lapse underwater video systems in the subtidal zone of the Mingan Islands, eastern Canada, to examine behavioural interactions of four kleptoparasites with the sea star Leptasterias polaris when it was feeding on infaunal (buried) clams. Departures of L. polaris from its prey coincided with interactions with kleptoparasites in 10 out of 10 filmed feeding bouts on the large clam Spisula polynyma, compared with only four out of 10 of filmed bouts on the smaller clam Mya truncata. The sea star's abandoning of the prey was most often caused by interactions with another sea star, Asterias vulgaris, a potential predator. The whelk (a carnivorous snail), Buccinum undatum, and the crabs Hyas araneus and Cancer irroratus, also kleptoparasitized L. polaris, especially when A. vulgaris was present. Comparisons of feeding bouts in the presence and absence of kleptoparasites showed that at least 10.4% of the prey mass captured by L. polaris was lost to kleptoparasites. Simultaneous current meter data showed that the movement of A. vulgaris and B. undatum to sites where L. polaris was feeding on S. polynyma was upstream, suggesting chemodetection of food odours. Crabs in the vicinity may also use visual cues. Leptasterias polaris is the only carnivore that can efficiently extract large clams from the sediments and therefore its foraging may supply a substantial part of the diet of kleptoparasites. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

From Nature 1979
MANY photographic surveys have been made of the deep-sea floor to determine objects of interest to both geologists and biologists1−4. With the exception of the use of the Isaacs5 baited 'Monster Camera', most photoreconnaisance surveys have suffered from being only instantaneous snapshots of the bottom. The added dimension provided by time sequence framing significantly increases the amount of information to be obtained from the use of bottom viewing cameras particularly in regard to the rates of various bottom processes. The Bottom Ocean Monitor (BOM) was developed by Gerard and Thorndike in 1974. It consists of a Thorndike time-lapse camera system and a long-term Thorndike photographic nephelometer mounted on a tripod with an Aandera current and temperature recorder6 above the tripod, all provided with an acoustic release. Using this equipment, we have taken more than 1,200 time-lapse photographs at 4,873 m depth in the North Equatorial Pacific Ocean. We report here that they show evidence of more rapid benthic biological processes and changes in sediment microtopography than had been previously assumed.

Bill
Canon 7d, Nauticam, Lots of glass, Olympus OMD-EM5, Nauticam, 60 macro, 45 macro, 8 mm fisheye, Inon, S&S, Athena Strobes plus lots of fiddly bits.
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