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Vertical lines seen w/ 105mm and S2


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#1 jnsgonda

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Posted 11 July 2003 - 04:49 PM

Hey gang,

I've noticed in some shots taken with the 105mm and S2 that there are "vertical line" artifacts in the areas that are beyond the DOF in some of the shots. Does anyone know what this is caused by and possibly how to prevent it. It is not very noticable with no cropping and 6X4 prints but is easily seen when zooming in at 33%. The visibility was very poor the day the shots were taken with a lot of particulates in the water. The vertical lines are not present in areas that are in focus.

The attached image is a 33% crop of the same Spanish Shawl pic I posted in Photo Critique. I hope it comes across in the attachment.

Thanks for your help,

John
Nikon D-200, Ikelite Housing, Dual DS-125 Strobes.

#2 marriard

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Posted 12 July 2003 - 08:54 AM

I've noticed in some shots taken with the 105mm and S2 that there are "vertical line" artifacts in the areas that are beyond the DOF in some of the shots.  Does anyone know what this is caused by and possibly how to prevent it.  It is not very noticable with no cropping and 6X4 prints but is easily seen when zooming in at 33%.  The visibility was very poor the day the shots were taken with a lot of particulates in the water.  The vertical lines are not present in areas that are in focus.  

I get this a lot when I over correct in Levels or Curves in Photoshop. Are you doing anything along these lines?

Also make sure you are shooting the 105mm at 100 ASA when doing macro.

Failing all that you can start playing with Photoshop and correct it manually. Between the healing, clone an the "Dust and Scratches" Noise filter you can do a lot to manage the effect.

M

#3 james

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Posted 12 July 2003 - 09:47 AM

Also may indicate a problem w/ your CCD. You should not have this pattern noise.

Was this converted from RAW or shot as JPEG?

It has nothing to do w/ the lens - it's a camera/processing problem.

James
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#4 jnsgonda

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Posted 12 July 2003 - 10:09 AM

Thanks for the input,

The shot was taken in RAW format then converted by RAW Converter EX increasing the exposure by 2.0. The ISO was set to 100. Shot at F19 and 1/60.

I agree that it probably has to do with manipulating the levels to a certain degree. Other pics that were properly exposed out of the camera do not show the effect. Others which were corrected more than 2.0 show it to a greater extent.

However, the idea of something being wrong with the CCD worries me. Is there some kind of diagnostic program available to camera owners without having to send it to a fuji repair center?

For the most part, the pictures taken with the 105mm seemed to be underexposed by 1.0 ev. I'll try setting the exposure compensation to +1.0 for the next time out. I know James described something similar when he used the 60mm.

Thanks again,

John
Nikon D-200, Ikelite Housing, Dual DS-125 Strobes.

#5 marriard

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Posted 12 July 2003 - 11:33 AM

The shot was taken in RAW format then converted by RAW Converter EX increasing the exposure by 2.0.  The ISO was set to 100.  Shot at F19 and 1/60.

I agree that it probably has to do with manipulating the levels to a certain degree.  Other pics that were properly exposed out of the camera do not show the effect.

However, the idea of something being wrong with the CCD worries me.  Is there some kind of diagnostic program available to camera owners without having to send it to a fuji repair center?

For the most part, the pictures taken with the 105mm seemed to be underexposed by 1.0 ev.  I'll try setting the exposure compensation to +1.0 for the next time out.  I know James described something similar when he used the 60mm.

2 full f-stops underexposed is a lot, even for DSLR. I have been shooting the Fuji S2 for macro with a +1.0 on the flash exposure and left the exposure setting itself alone which has been working pretty well for me.

There is not a diagnosic program like this that I am aware of, but if images that are properly exposed right out of the camera are not showing the effect, then I wouldn't be worried about it.

M

#6 james

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Posted 12 July 2003 - 11:40 AM

Yes, it's the 2 stop correction in RAW converter EX that is introducing the lines. I have gotten that myself when trying to do 2 stops.

If you are getting consistent TTL underexposure, then dial in +1 stops of FLASH compensation. The exposure compensation won't do a thing to help.

Cheers
James
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#7 jnsgonda

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Posted 12 July 2003 - 12:41 PM

James,

Marriard,

Thanks for the info. I'll do as you suggested and dial up the Flash compensation by 1.0 and also check the histogram in between shots and dial it up further if needed. (I didn't do this last time out).

I'll report back next weekend.

Question: When would adjusting the exposure compensation be appropriate?

Thanks again,

John :D
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#8 james

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Posted 12 July 2003 - 01:03 PM

Why so sad John?

Adjusting the eposure compensation will affect the background exposure. Since there is no background exposure really for macro shots, it won't be affected.

You use the exposure +/- when you are using the camera's exposure light meters to set the fstop or shutterspeed or both. As an example: if you dial in +1 stop of exposure, then if the camera thinks you should shoot f8 it will set your fstop to f5.6

HTH
James Wiseman
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#9 jnsgonda

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Posted 12 July 2003 - 01:11 PM

James,

Sad because I had the "OK" button specifically installed (thanks Ike!) to check the histograms and then didn't use it when I needed to.

John
Nikon D-200, Ikelite Housing, Dual DS-125 Strobes.