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How build your own INON orange filters


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#1 nachogil

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Posted 18 April 2009 - 08:22 AM

Hi,

A nice article about how to built orange filters for INON strobes:

http://www.dbuceo.co...a-flashes-inon/

Is in Spanish, but with many photos.

#2 Deep6

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 06:51 PM

Hi,

A nice article about how to built orange filters for INON strobes:

http://www.dbuceo.co...a-flashes-inon/

Is in Spanish, but with many photos.


Gracias,

I did the same thing for my Inons. A Roscoe ct 1/8 straw (yellow) to change the color temp. from 5200 K to 5000 K. Look up the mired value you want on Lee filters and find the Roscoe equlivient at the roscoe site. I also make red filtes for my night dive lights. These ? x 20" sheets polyester sheets are about $6.50 USD.
Regards,
Bob

Edited by Deep6, 19 April 2009 - 06:54 PM.

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#3 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 11:15 PM

Inons start at 5500K.

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#4 GHP

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 10:29 AM

Maybe a dumb question, but - Why would you want to?

#5 Deep6

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 01:45 PM

Inons start at 5500K.


Mea culpa!!! For that case it should be 1/8 CT straw or 1/8 CT orange ; +20 or +26 mired shift ; 5500 --> 5000 K. I tried just the 1/8 CT straw on each Inon Z240 strobe with the camera's white balance set for broad sun (5000 K). The water was too green in Bayan Bay Phil., so I removed the gels and set the WB to 5300 K. Looks warm to me, but I have not had time to evaluate the shots. Next time I may try magenta/green filters.

Bob

Edited by Deep6, 22 April 2009 - 08:31 PM.

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#6 craig

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 03:08 PM

It really depends on how you want to alter the color of the water. Warming filters emulate the effect of a warmer wide angle strobe but add some green while adding blue. Green filters will make the water bluer but redder at the same time. You can also consider a yellow strobe filter. Yellow somewhat combines the effects of warming and green filters. Yellow adds blue to the water without adding any red or green as the other two options do.

I tried yellow on my last trip but the water was so blue already that I removed them. I used a filter similar to a CC10G instead since that was my weakest choice.

These homemade filters look a whole lot like mine only much more neatly made. :(
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#7 Gudge

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 03:31 PM

Maybe a dumb question, but - Why would you want to?

Read this:

http://www.amustard....=...news&size=s
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#8 GHP

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 05:55 AM

Read this:

http://www.amustard....=...news&size=s


Thanks Gudge.
That is a fascinating article. But now I have another question. I use SB-105's. Apparently my strobes are 4700 degrees K. This, if I am understanding it correctly is the "warmer" (redder) end of the scale?
So, (again, assuming my understanding is correct) in warm blue water, my strobes are good. But in cool, green water (I dive mostly in the UK) I would need to "cool down" the temp, which would effectively push from green towards blue?
If this is the right thought path, then how do I work out which filter, and strength, to do the job?
Sorry in advance if I have this wrong.I think I am getting more confused, but I'm not sure :(

#9 Deep6

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 06:18 AM

That is a fascinating article. But now I have another question. I use SB-105's. Apparently my strobes are 4700 degrees K. This, if I am understanding it correctly is the "warmer" (redder) end of the scale?
So, (again, assuming my understanding is correct) in warm blue water, my strobes are good. But in cool, green water (I dive mostly in the UK) I would need to "cool down" the temp, which would effectively push from green towards blue?
If this is the right thought path, then how do I work out which filter, and strength, to do the job?
Sorry in advance if I have this wrong.I think I am getting more confused, but I'm not sure :(


Google on Lee Filters and seclect Lighting. Under that topic is Mired Shift Calculator. Enter 4700 to 5000 K and you get eighth blue Lee 218 -18 mired shift. This assumes that your strobes are 4700 K. You may want to research Young' Color Theory and color correction.

Bob

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#10 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 06:32 AM

But in cool, green water (I dive mostly in the UK) I would need to "cool down" the temp, which would effectively push from green towards blue?


Cooling down the strobes (with filters) would have the effect of pushing blue backgrounds more green. Some like stronger green backgrounds, others like to make UK waters look blue and inviting.

Enter 4700 to 5000 K and you get eighth blue Lee 218 -18 mired shift. This assumes that your strobes are 4700 K.


A 4700 to 5000K is a -12 Mired shift. A -18 mired shift filter (1/8 Blue) would result in a strobe colour temp of 5150K.

Alex

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#11 GHP

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 07:11 AM

Cooling down the strobes (with filters) would have the effect of pushing blue backgrounds more green. Some like stronger green backgrounds, others like to make UK waters look blue and inviting.



A 4700 to 5000K is a -12 Mired shift. A -18 mired shift filter (1/8 Blue) would result in a strobe colour temp of 5150K.

Alex


I must admit, when in green water, I like to have green backgrounds. If in the blue, then it becomes natural to have blue. I have no real desire to make green water appear bluer, because to me it does not represent the real scene.( at least that's what I like to see in pics)
But the foreground, now that's a different matter.
I think this is something I might have a play with, at least if using "stick-on" gels, it is easy to take a selection and try each on the same scene, basically the same as trying with and without diffusers.
I will try and find a source in the Uk for lighting gels. More fun.

#12 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 07:29 AM

I think this is something I might have a play with, at least if using "stick-on" gels, it is easy to take a selection and try each on the same scene, basically the same as trying with and without diffusers.
I will try and find a source in the Uk for lighting gels. More fun.


Depending on your gloves - I would say that it would be almost impossible to take them on and off underwater in cold conditions. They are quite fiddly!

When I have done my before and after shots in cold water I had one warm and one cool strobe - and just did the test shots with single flash.

Alex

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#13 GHP

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Posted 23 April 2009 - 08:19 AM

Depending on your gloves - I would say that it would be almost impossible to take them on and off underwater in cold conditions. They are quite fiddly!

When I have done my before and after shots in cold water I had one warm and one cool strobe - and just did the test shots with single flash.

Alex


Good point, but I have a little cheat for that problem. I have an old pair of 5mm gloves where I have worn away the fingertip area over time. These are great, as they keep your hands warm, but i still have the feeling in my fingertips ! It doesn't make any difference to the warmth of my hands.

#14 mwst

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 09:05 AM

Hi,

 

this thread is old but i am looking for a homemade filter solution for my inon strobes.

 

The problem: The link is offline .....!!!!

 

Some more links ?

 

Thanks

 

Martin



#15 escape

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 04:34 PM

Try gel filter (Lee or Rosco #444 / Eighth CT Straw).

Cut it and sandwich between diffuser.

 

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#16 rtrski

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Posted 11 May 2013 - 10:08 AM

That's what I did (same as Eunjae's post above).  Just cut it out, hole-punch it to fit over the diffuser mount holes, screw diffuser back on.  Cheap and simple.  Doesn't even matter if it gets crinkled over time - it's not going to be taking too much away from a z240 or other high power strobe.

 

And of course original credit goes to Alex Mustard's article, at least for my inspiration.  Couple these with the new ability in LR (new to me - I haven't used LR very long) to do selective color shifts for the background water tint and I'm much happier about finding a pleasing foreground and background color balance (to my eye at least...I am not nor will I ever be a paid/pro photographer).


Edited by rtrski, 11 May 2013 - 10:09 AM.

Current rig: Sony SLT-alpha55 in Ikelite housing, Sigma 105mm f2.8 DC Macro w/ Ike 5505.58 flat port or Sigma 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 DC HSM behind UWCamStuff custom 5" mini-dome. Dual INON z240 Type IVs triggered with DS51 for TTL mimicry, or DS51 alone with home-made ringflash assy for macro.

 

Topside, unhoused: Sony SLT-alpha99, Sigma 150-500mm + 1.4TC (Saving for Sony 70-400 G2), Sigma 15mm diagonal fish, Sony 24-70mm f2.8 CZ, Tamron 180mm f2.8 Macro...all the gear and nary a clue...


#17 mwst

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 07:59 AM

Thanks...... i wil try it !

 

Martin