Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Jim Abernethy's Liveaboard


  • Please log in to reply
81 replies to this topic

#1 ladydianabret

ladydianabret

    Sea Nettle

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 11 posts

Posted 22 April 2009 - 06:47 AM

Beware all you LIVEABOARD TRAVELERS:
As an avid woman liveaboard traveler, I felt compelled to add a warning to those who might be considering going with Jim Abernethy out of Palm Beach, Florida. Here is an account of my experience.:

This boat is 65 ft. long and there were 14 people on it. The cabins were so small that my friend and I had to take turns going in the room. There was one camera area with one table which would seat one person only if they had their camera gear spread out....
On Monday, our first day out, I had to go wake up Jim A. at 4:30 p.m. to ask him when we could dive. We anxiously waited all day. We then dove 1 time. Now I usually dive 5 times a day, but on this week trip, I only dove 8 dives. Sometimes, I would wait and wait to dive, then go lie down, ask Jim to awaken me when we were going to dive, and he would forget and I would miss the dive. We were not offered more than two dives a day. I was afraid to ask Jim about how we were supposed to know when to dive, as he would get angry at just about anything and I was afraid of him.

We were promised that our equipment would be hosed down when we arrived in Palm Beach, but that never happened. We had run out of enough water.....I asked for two hangers to hang up some wet things, but there were none extra. We were constantly moving our camera equipment out of people's way on the floor..Way too crowded....Very Bad Experience. I could add much more, but this is sufficient for now.

#2 loftus

loftus

    Blue Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4571 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Winter Park, Fl

Posted 22 April 2009 - 07:28 AM

Sorry to hear about your experience, and I can't speak to your concerns with the amount of diving etc, just would say I'm surprised.
Nevertheless the Shear Water is not a luxury liveaboard, and on the contrary, is a bare bones diving experience with limited space to sleep, eat, rest your camera etc. I have been on the Shearwater twice and will be going again next month, having had some of the best diving experiences with them. I think people planning trips on this liveaboard, should do their research prior to booking, as they should for any trip. At the risk of being accused of being a chauvinist (which I may well be :( ) I would say that trips on the Shear Water are a 'boys trip' and yes women are invited and welcome, but they are a 'boys trip' experience nevertheless. The Shear Water is not for everyone. I like to think my Shear Water trip is an annual experience, but I definitely will not be taking my wife. In fact I know I could not drag her onto the boat for any amount of money. My wife considers the Holiday Inn to be camping.

Edited by loftus, 22 April 2009 - 07:37 AM.

Nikon D800, Nikon D7000, Nauticam, Inons, Subtronic Novas. Lens collection - 10-17, 15, 16, 16-35, 14-24, 24-70, 85, 18-200, 28-300, 70-200, 60 and 105, TC's. Macs with Aperture and Photoshop.

#3 yahsemtough

yahsemtough

    Great Canadian Mokarran

  • Senior Moderator
  • 3495 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada

Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:05 AM

I have been on the Shearwater a number of times.

Yes, the accommodations can be tight especially with lots of photographer on board. That said I really never notice it because I am used to being around a lot of photographers. I am there for the images.

While I am unsure if the weather was preventing you from anchoring on sites. This recently happened to us. (February 2009) I have always experienced that the boat dive schedule is an open platform. Once on a site you can enter and re-enter pretty much on your own schedule. The crew is always around and approachable to ask if you are unsure as to whether you can get into the water.

While I am sorry to hear the experience did not live up to your expectations. I agree that some research on their website into the type of boat and specifications may have indicated the close quarters.

As for Jim getting angry, I can only assume you mean some other Jim Abernethy. I'll add that Jim is a friend but, I have never seen him get angry to someone while I have been in his presence.

Sorry to hear your experience did not turn out how you had hoped.

Cheers

Todd
Todd Mintz
tmintz.com
all photographs posted © Todd C Mintz

#4 philsokol

philsokol

    Manta Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 453 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:10 AM

Of the 7 liveaboards that I've done, the Shearwater was the most (ahem) let's say...spartan. There's limited space for gear, the salon is small, the bunks are tight, there are 2 shared heads for up to 14 guests and as ladydianabret says, it's hard to have 2 people standing in your cabin at the same time.

With that said, I had my first trip earlier this year and can't wait to go back. It is a unique experience and not for everyone, but one I'm dying to repeat.

Phil

Phil Sokol
Canon 5D3 and 7D, Nauticam and Subal, an assortment of strobes and too many damn lenses!
"Hey Dean! How do you work this crazy thing?!" Jerry Lewis


#5 dhaas

dhaas

    Great White

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1005 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:17 AM

I will chime on one more thing and echo Jeff and Todd's appraisal of a trip on M/V Shearwater.

I think when people hear "live aboard" they think of going on a huge yacht with a bit of diving. Dressing up a bit for dinner, etc. That's certainly describes some of the live aboard offerings out there in various parts of the world. As Todd and Jeff said they know what Shearwater offers and doesn't and have chosen accordingly :(

What Shearwater DOES offer in place of tighter quarters and having to be a bit flexible is TRUE ADVENTURE.

You won't get a sanitized version of diving with various animals and they provide experiences you won't get anywhere else IMHO.

The freedom to dive and shoot, share ideas with other photographers and be what I call "out there" with minimal reasonable restraints is almost unparalleled. Even non-photographers who have gone on these trips with me have come back with remarkable experiences and memories.

I hope your experience was more due to weather and possibly not knowing the vessel's size, itinerary etc.

It's not for everyone but for those who want TRUE ADVENTURE DIVING it certainly has been the ticket for me :P

YMMV

dhaas
David Haas
www.haasimages.com

#6 echeng

echeng

    The Blue

  • Admin
  • 5842 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Francisco, CA
  • Interests:photography, ice cream, cello, chamber music, quadcopters

Posted 22 April 2009 - 08:49 AM

I'm sorry you had a bad experience on the Shearwater. I've been on it probably 8-10 times, and I've loved each experience. As you mentioned, the boat is cramped, and you do have to share space with other people, cameras, and crew. Even I have had times when I've had to get away -- and the only way to do that is to crawl into your tiny bunk. We try to mitigate this problem by running reduced loads on our trips, but including crew, there will always be 12-14 people on the boat.

All trip reports show very clearly what the boat is like, and you can find dozens of them online very easily. If you are the type of person who needs luxuries and space, the Shearwater is not for you.

As for Jim being angry, the only time I've seen him really firm with people is when someone is extremely negative and isn't open to experiences outside a narrow expectation. In fact, he has booted people off of the boat and offered their money back before, rather than have extreme negativity pollute the trip for everyone else on the boat.

Were you open to new experiences and willing to compromise a bit for the best shark diving in the world? If not, the trip probably wasn't for you...
eric cheng
publisher/editor, wetpixel
www | journal | photos


#7 MIKE POWELL

MIKE POWELL

    Eagle Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 353 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tampa, FL

Posted 22 April 2009 - 09:12 AM

Come on Jim...fork over some money for a YACHT and quit being such a MEANY! Oh yea...make sure the head flushes completely so we don't have look at someone else's POOO !! Ba ha ha!!

It's not a luxury liveaboard, but I don't remember it advertised as such.

Ditto earlier comments....It's more of a dudes adventure trip and at least it has A/C.

I'll keep going back!
Visit My Website

7D Nauticam + Z240's

#8 echeng

echeng

    The Blue

  • Admin
  • 5842 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Francisco, CA
  • Interests:photography, ice cream, cello, chamber music, quadcopters

Posted 22 April 2009 - 09:25 AM

Without regular "brown cloud" events at Tiger Beach, the trip would really not be the same... :(
eric cheng
publisher/editor, wetpixel
www | journal | photos


#9 Drew

Drew

    The Controller

  • Video Expert
  • 10644 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:GPS is not reliable in South East Asian seas

Posted 22 April 2009 - 09:45 AM

Beware all you LIVEABOARD TRAVELERS:
As an avid woman liveaboard traveler, I felt compelled to add a warning to those who might be considering going with Jim Abernethy out of Palm Beach, Florida. Here is an account of my experience.:

This boat is 65 ft. long and there were 14 people on it. The cabins were so small that my friend and I had to take turns going in the room. There was one camera area with one table which would seat one person only if they had their camera gear spread out....
On Monday, our first day out, I had to go wake up Jim A. at 4:30 p.m. to ask him when we could dive. We anxiously waited all day. We then dove 1 time. Now I usually dive 5 times a day, but on this week trip, I only dove 8 dives. Sometimes, I would wait and wait to dive, then go lie down, ask Jim to awaken me when we were going to dive, and he would forget and I would miss the dive. We were not offered more than two dives a day. I was afraid to ask Jim about how we were supposed to know when to dive, as he would get angry at just about anything and I was afraid of him.

We were promised that our equipment would be hosed down when we arrived in Palm Beach, but that never happened. We had run out of enough water.....I asked for two hangers to hang up some wet things, but there were none extra. We were constantly moving our camera equipment out of people's way on the floor..Way too crowded....Very Bad Experience. I could add much more, but this is sufficient for now.


Diana,
I'm sure a bad trip is something no one wants and it's a pity you had a bad experience on the JASA trip. You're going to find many people coming to JASA's defense. The boat's dimensions are clearly written and described on the JASA website though, but I can understand how hard it is to envision the true lack of space on that boat and I can see why you'd be shocked. However, most people would enjoy the shark dives so much that all that would become unimportant, which is why you have so many people already defending the trip.
Regarding your dives, were you promised 5 dives a day when you booked? Or did you just assume there'd be 5 dives a day? Those are very different things. Perusing the JASA website, I can't find the number of dives included in a trip. If the booking agent promised you 5 dives a day and the conditions were safe to do so, then you should bring it up to the person booking your trip. As Todd says, usually the SW parks on the site for open platform diving. I'd also be interested in what expectations you had for the trip and why you chose it?
As for Jim A being fierce and you were afraid of talking to him, that could possibly be a personality issue. For example, Eric Cheng often thinks I'm rude to people, yet I think I'm being efficient and curt :(. Some people do speak in abrupt short sentences with a rough tone.which can be interpreted as anger. If Jim seemed unapproachable to you, did you try asking the other dive staff? Were they all unapproachable? Did you ask why there were only 2 dives?
Jim does have a certain style of running a trip and for some, it's pretty far from what they'd expect from a normal liveaboard. The distinction is that it is not a normal liveaboard trip with a regimented schedule as the dives are contingent on the sharks showing up etc.
I do appreciate your report as it will highlight what the JASA trip is or isn't for others who are doing research for this trip. Most of the time, the trip reports on JASA rave about the shark encounters and forget the basic things like accommodation and the boat amentities. Your review will probably help JASA and potential customers by adding a reality check to the raving about the sharkmad. :P

Drew
Moderator
"Journalism is what someone else does not want printed, everything else is public relations."

"I was born not knowing, and have only had a little time to change that here and there.


#10 yahsemtough

yahsemtough

    Great Canadian Mokarran

  • Senior Moderator
  • 3495 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada

Posted 22 April 2009 - 10:04 AM

Without regular "brown cloud" events at Tiger Beach, the trip would really not be the same... :P


It often reminds me of Eddie Murphy "Delirious" live performance and the skit on the big brown shark in the tub. :(

Funny on screen but not so much on the dive.
Todd Mintz
tmintz.com
all photographs posted © Todd C Mintz

#11 loftus

loftus

    Blue Whale

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4571 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Winter Park, Fl

Posted 22 April 2009 - 10:28 AM

Diana,
I'm sure a bad trip is something no one wants and it's a pity you had a bad experience on the JASA trip. You're going to find many people coming to JASA's defense. The boat's dimensions are clearly written and described on the JASA website though, but I can understand how hard it is to envision the true lack of space or on that boat and I can see why you'd be shocked. However, most people would enjoy the shark dives so much that all that would become unimportant, which is why you have so many people already defending the trip.
Regarding your dives, were you promised 5 dives a day when you booked? Or did you just assume there'd be 5 dives a day? Those are very different things. Perusing the JASA website, I can't find the number of dives included in a trip. If the booking agent promised you 5 dives a day and the conditions were safe to do so, then you should bring it up to the person booking your trip. As Todd says, usually the SW parks on the site for open platform diving. I'd also be interested in what expectations you had for the trip and why you chose it?
As for Jim A being fierce and you were afraid of talking to him, that could possibly be a personality issue. For example, Eric Cheng often thinks I'm rude to people, yet I think I'm being efficient and curt :(. Some people do speak in abrupt short sentences with a rough tone.which can be interpreted as anger. If Jim seemed unapproachable to you, did you try asking the other dive staff? Were they all unapproachable? Did you ask why there were only 2 dives?
Jim does have a certain style of running a trip and for some, it's pretty far from what they'd expect from a normal liveaboard. The distinction is that it is not a normal liveaboard trip with a regimented schedule as the dives are contingent on the sharks showing up etc.
I do appreciate your report as it will highlight what the JASA trip is or isn't for others who are doing research for this trip. Most of the time, the trip reports on JASA rave about the shark encounters and forget the basic things like accommodation and the boat amentities. Your review will probably help JASA and potential customers by adding a reality check to the raving about the sharkmad. :P

Well stated Crew; actually like most things it's about expectations, and clearing them up ahead of time.
Nikon D800, Nikon D7000, Nauticam, Inons, Subtronic Novas. Lens collection - 10-17, 15, 16, 16-35, 14-24, 24-70, 85, 18-200, 28-300, 70-200, 60 and 105, TC's. Macs with Aperture and Photoshop.

#12 bmyates

bmyates

    Great White

  • Team Wetpixel
  • 975 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Seattle, WA
  • Interests:UW Photography, motorcycles.

Posted 22 April 2009 - 01:17 PM

I can't add a lot to the comments above, but I'll make a few points. First, dive vacations are expensive, and I feel bad for anyone who goes on one and has a lousy time.

Having said that, I've been on Shearwater 3 times, and will definitely go back for more. It is about as un-yacht-like as any liveaboard I've been on (except some tiny diesel Indonesian craft). I can remember shaking my head numerous times on Shearwater as I embarked on "tip-toe through the cameras," which covered virtuatlly the entire floor of the salon.

But that, and cramped quarters in general, are really what I think of as part of the "cost of admission" to see the things you can see on Shearwater trips.

Bruce Yates
www.UnderwaterReflections.com
Canon 5DMkII in Aquatica, 1DsMkII in Seacam, G15 in RecSea...Inon Z240's...too many lenses
"If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. No use being a damned fool about it." WC Fields


#13 Drew

Drew

    The Controller

  • Video Expert
  • 10644 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:GPS is not reliable in South East Asian seas

Posted 22 April 2009 - 05:01 PM

In fact I know I could not drag her onto the boat for any amount of money. My wife considers the Holiday Inn to be camping.

There's always a price :P I consider the holiday inn suffering but have stayed in worse places for long periods for purposes. It's all about the motivation to get what you want.

Well stated Crew; actually like most things it's about expectations, and clearing them up ahead of time.

Crew? Is that like CRaigdrEW combined? :(

Seriously though, I expected the pro JASA wagons to be circled around JASA in quick time on WP. However, Diana is understandably frustrated and her report should be definitely used to give others an idea of the "other side." All the glowing reports about JASA trips are great, but the ones I've read are usually about how a tiger did a pirouette for the FE etc and not about the boat conditions etc. And that's fine but doesn't give a proper picture of the boat. Furthermore, the website doesn't really give a detailed idea of the way things are run. Just because many people accept the loss of creature comforts for the experience doesn't mean everyone is willing to.
Seeing what Eric stated about Jim's willingness to send people home based on chemistry, it's not unreasonable to accept Diana's assertion of Jim seemed unapproachable to her. Perhaps she shouldn't have used the word "warning" but missing a dive because the crew failed to notify passengers on such a small boat, there was definitely some sort of communication breakdown there. I suspect the Shear Water crew's version of things will be vastly different. I put it down to bad luck on 2 opposing personalities meeting in a confined space called the Shear Water. :D Neither did anything wrong really and I hope for those researching this trip and unable to glean useful information from those raving reports of great shark diving will find this negative report a nice juxtapose and reality check for those not merely interested in the shark diving.

Drew
Moderator
"Journalism is what someone else does not want printed, everything else is public relations."

"I was born not knowing, and have only had a little time to change that here and there.


#14 jcclink

jcclink

    Great Hammerhead

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 741 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Diego

Posted 22 April 2009 - 06:13 PM

Sounds to me like a high maintenance person that did not do her homework beforehand. We all know the Shearwater is a working boat, not a 5 star liveaboard. We go for the sharks & Jim's expertice in getting us up close & personal for an unforgetable experience. No other trip like it. Just back from my 3rd adventure. Will be back again next year. You're there for the sharks - not the boat. You may not do a lot of dives/day but that's ok - its quality not quantity. Jim's dive site setups require certain sea & current conditions to produce the desired interface with sharks. This means that sometimes we have to wait on board with no diving. Some days you may not dive at all, other days you may be u/w for 6-8 hrs. (Tiger Beach - 17ft deep, 150min dives, open gate.) No complaints. And yes you can pet a 12ft tiger shark if you wish.

Edited by jcclink, 23 April 2009 - 08:43 AM.

Nexus D300, 10-17mm, 12-24mm, 17-55mm, 60mm, 105mm VR
S&S YS110's & YS27's

#15 Drew

Drew

    The Controller

  • Video Expert
  • 10644 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:GPS is not reliable in South East Asian seas

Posted 22 April 2009 - 10:17 PM

Sounds to me like a high maintenance person that did not do her homework beforehand. We all know the Shearwater is not a 5 star liveaboard - that's not why we go.

Jcclink, is it necessary to label someone high maintenance because their expectations weren't in line with the popular view here? From the few reports I read here, most of the reports delve deeply into the sharks dives but not much on how many dives, length of time etc, details that would be helpful to some researching. I don't think any report particularly mentioned Jim's unique style of running the trip either.
I just skimmed the 2 wetpixel trip 05 and 07 journals by Eric. Nowhere did I see a detailed description of the shearwater, other than it's a small boat. When people like a trip, they tend to forgive the little things and take certain discomforts in stride. For someone going on their first trip, it's unrealistic to expect every one to think the same way. I googled jim abernethy shear water report and the first trip report was an old undercurrent one where the accommodations was rated 4*, with no description of the boat. Going by that and the very popular support from Wetpixel, including the site owner and most of the staff, I'd say it's an endorsement of a good trip. So why wouldn't everyone want to join in?
I definitely want to encourage people to post reports on popular dive trips even if they are negative so long as it's reasonable and fair. It gives a different side of things. I'm sure Jim's operational reputation is solid enough whereby one negative report of the ops isn't going to affect him. It'll probably do him a favor by helping those thinking of the trip to know what is involved.
Diana's report seems reasonable to me. She went on the trip, water ran out, she missed dives due to the lack of communication between client and crew, there were no spare hangers for stuff, and her gear wasn't washed. Nobody is disputing the boat is crowded and small. Just that many here obviously don't mind it and Diana does. She didn't enjoy the trip and she's reporting the reasons why.
The only thing slightly controversial statement was that she was afraid of talking to Jim for whatever reason. Just because Diana didn't like the trip doesn't mean she is a high maintenance person. It's great that JASA fans come out in support of the operation. It shows the trip delivers. Please let's allow a bit of dissension when it's not unreasonable. In fact I hope Diana writes in more detail about how she viewed the trip.

Drew
Moderator
"Journalism is what someone else does not want printed, everything else is public relations."

"I was born not knowing, and have only had a little time to change that here and there.


#16 PRC

PRC

    Great White

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1163 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Guernsey Channel Islands

Posted 22 April 2009 - 10:32 PM

The JASA trips are an experience to be sure. Have been on two, and yes the boat is a bit on the tight side and a bit Spartan - but I did not go for the life on deck.

Jim is a hell of a character and I would think that if you do not get on with him then you are in for a hell of a time. To be honest I suspect that he does not really like me much for some reason or other.

If you stand up to him and fight your corner right or wrong - you will go down in a hail of stones and have a miserable exsistance, there is only one way - that's Jims way :( .

Having said that I have always found him fair - though he will be 'on your case' on about 6 milliseconds if he believes that you are being unsafe, I have a lot of respect for him, what he does and how he does it.

As for lack of diving - mmmm not on any JASA trips that I have been on, quite the opposite - I have been pretty 'dived out' most days. If the group shows itself to be 'sound' then a 'pool is open' approach is often taken.

As a suggestion - anyone considering one of these trips as a 'first time virgin' - try to get on a group trip - the Wetpixel sponsored ones I have been on were great and you have both experienced shark and Jim 'wranglers' on board.

Paul C
Nikon D300, Subal, 2 * Inon 240
Water Temp (just cold & Nasty)
My Pictures

#17 alvinjamur

alvinjamur

    Shark Bait Philosopher

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 21 posts
  • Location:Manhattan, New York
  • Interests:Scuba, Photography (Land + UW), Computational Finance, Computers, Music (all kinds!), Gadgets

Posted 23 April 2009 - 08:30 AM

I was one of the passengers on the trip when Diana went. I and the other passenger
saw first hand on what transpired. Here's my reply to each and every point Diana
raises.

>Beware all you LIVEABOARD TRAVELERS: This boat is 65 ft. long and there were 14 people
>on it. The cabins were so small that my friend and I had to take turns going in the room.
>There was one camera area with one table which would seat one person only if they had
>their camera gear spread out....

The size of the boat are fully spelt out on the site. The two dining tables are used as
camera tables and its plain dimensional/spatial sense to realize that they can seat
more than one person at a time. Anyone that thinks otherwise is either spatially
challenged or is high on something.

>On Monday, our first day out, I had to go wake up Jim A. at 4:30 p.m. to ask him when we
>could dive. We anxiously waited all day. We then dove 1 time. Now I usually dive 5 times a day,
>but on this week trip, I only dove 8 dives. Sometimes, I would wait and wait to dive, then go
>lie down, ask Jim to awaken me when we were going to dive, and he would forget and I would
>miss the dive. We were not offered more than two dives a day. I was afraid to ask Jim about
>how we were supposed to know when to dive, as he would get angry at just about anything
>and I was afraid of him.

This statement is a blatant manufactured LIE!!! The crossing was especially rough with 10-12
foot seas. Given that Jim did not know the diving skills of people on the boat, it was a safety
issue to be diving in seas that were rough and also filled with big Sharks. On this particular
trip it was apparent to me that several of the safety briefing instructions that were given by
Jim were blatantly and blissfully ignored. Several people on this particular (including Diana)
needed more help than others as they consistently and persistently ignored the safety briefings.

Jim, myself and others on the boat were indeed annoyed at Diana because of her rather
vexatious attitude towards people on the boat. The pronounced negative attitude was strewn
about on the other passengers as well as the staff of the Shearwater. All it takes is one person
with negativity to bring down the camraderie of a whole boat and its all the more easier to do
it on a small boat such as the Shearwater. I would rather not repeat here what Diana asked
every male member not to do on the boat the first evening. Her query was rather insulting,
demeaning and exhibited a total lack of tact towards strangers.

Its NOT the number of dives you do for capturing images but the quality of the dives and water
conditions that yield good pictures!! There were people on the boat that did 3-4 dives a day so
saying that there were not enough dives is just mendacity at its best.

>We were promised that our equipment would be hosed down when we arrived in Palm Beach, but
>that never happened. We had run out of enough water.....I asked for two hangers to hang up some
>wet things, but there were none extra. We were constantly moving our camera equipment out of
>people's way on the floor..Way too crowded....

On the last day of the trip the boat had 300G of water. There were enough hangers out front to
hang our stuff. When you have a small boat and you have a lot of camera gear its very obvious
that people leave their stuff around. That's the way the pigeonhole principle works!!

>Very Bad Experience. I could add much more, but this is sufficient for now.

VERY GOOD EXPERIENCE! If people want to have hot towels after a dive, they should be looking
elsewhere. Rest assured, the core experience will not be the same as diving on Jim's boat. This
was my third trip on the Shearwater and I will go again.

THE ABOVE IS MY UNEQUIVOCAL, CONSIDERED, TRUTHFUL OBSERVATION and I'm sure many
on these forums that have been on the Shearwater will agree with.

- aLV

#18 MIKE POWELL

MIKE POWELL

    Eagle Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 353 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tampa, FL

Posted 23 April 2009 - 10:08 AM

Come on aLV -- you gotta tell us what she told the men not to do --- cuss, burp, pass gas, scratch your package, leave the toilet seat up, etc.????
Visit My Website

7D Nauticam + Z240's

#19 davichin

davichin

    Great White

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1106 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain

Posted 23 April 2009 - 02:41 PM

I am booked on a trip aboard the SW (my first), and I am taking my girlfriend :D ... I made sure she read boat reports and saw enough pictures of the boat to make sure she understood how it is. In the end, she is only worried about only having a small plastic tube to "defend" herself of tigers etc... while I carry a big camera setup :P Now I am thinking on letting her use a second setup (which I could use with a different lens...) but my worries are that she may start taking pictures and quit modeling! :D maybe a battery forgotten camera will do.... :(

P.D: I guess Diana´s report was an accident waiting to happen due to the SW conditions and I do not think anyone will quit going by it but, what slighty worries me, is having days without diving etc... Is that common? :)
D300, D7000. 10.5, 10-17, 16, 10-20, 17-70, 60, 105, 150 Hugyfots, Subtronic Novas, Seacams 350, YS250s, YS-D1s
Aqualung Team
www.davidbarrio.com

#20 alvinjamur

alvinjamur

    Shark Bait Philosopher

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 21 posts
  • Location:Manhattan, New York
  • Interests:Scuba, Photography (Land + UW), Computational Finance, Computers, Music (all kinds!), Gadgets

Posted 23 April 2009 - 02:50 PM

Come on aLV -- you gotta tell us what she told the men not to do --- cuss, burp, pass gas, scratch your package, leave the toilet seat up, etc.????



OK! At the risk of being labelled "impropritious", I will tell u.

Imagine meeting a lady and treating her so, and then within the first 15
minutes of meting being told that, "Men are no good. Don't pee all over
the toilet seat."

OR

being an English gent and then being told, "Britain is so small but there
are too many of you everywhere."

OR

telling the chef, "Is that what you call lunch?" and completely ignoring
what was transpiring on the dive platform....

....just PLAIN NEGATIVITY, HIGH MAINTENANCE, ALL THE WHILE IGNORING
THINGS THAT WERE SAID ON THE SAFETY BRIEFING!!

Its just an utter and plain lack of tact and propriety towards people that you
don't know. Never a good thing on any boat with a few people. As you can
imagine people that perpetrate this feel an alienation. Regardless, it never
hurts to be civil but I think its beyond some people.

I can tell u that Jim and his staff were absolutely fantastic and had to work
overtime on that last trip because there were certain divers that most
definitely posed a safety hazard. Its one thing to go dive on a luxury
liveaboard, looking at corals and taking pictures of damselfish and another
to be diving with Tiger Sharks, Bull Sharks, Lemon Sharks and with bait.
The latter needs presence of mind; a lack of it will most likely cause accidents.

- aLV