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INON Fisheye 165AD


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#1 segon

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 06:25 AM

Hi,

This is my first post here. The pictures were taken on my second dive with INON Fisheye 165AD.
What can be improved on these pictures? What should I consider next time diving with Fisheye?

Posted Image Posted Image

Canon PowerShot S45, INON S2000, INON 165AD Fisheye

Thanks!

#2 Simon Rogerson

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 04:24 PM

For early attempts with a fisheye, these shots are great – nicely framed and evenly lit. They are also very well conceived, using the harsher light of the sun to back-light the foreground subject.

So, constructive criticism... Those foregrounds are a bit drab. It looks like you were in the Caribbean or the Bahamas, where this type of coral is quite common. When it's lit with strobes, it comes out brown, which is nice, but not spectacular. Try looking with your torch for bright sponges in reds and pinks and oranges, which will provide a more dramatic counterpoint to the blue water background. You just need to apply your close-focus, wide angle technique to a more striking subject.

The second image has less impact, perhaps because the foreground is a bit empty. It would probably be better if you cropped in close on the coral tree and left out the bottom third of the image.

Other than that, it's just a question of working closely with your model: get them to tie down that stray cylinder strap, stow that dangling torch away, then experiment with as many different poses as possible. If the model is your buddy, discuss a few different modelling 'moves' before the dive so that you can communicate them as easily as possible underwater.

Edited by Simon Rogerson, 07 January 2010 - 03:46 AM.


#3 CompuDude

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 04:33 PM

Other than that, it's just a question of working closely with your model: get then to tie down that stray cylinder strap, stow that dangling torch away, then experiment with as many different poses as possible. If the model is your buddy, discuss a few different modelling 'moves' before the dive so that you can communicate them as easily as possible underwater.

That's what Photoshop is for. :D

But otherwise, agreed. Nice work!

#4 Simon Rogerson

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 03:43 AM

That's what Photoshop is for. :D

But otherwise, agreed. Nice work!


Hmm. Look at the torch. It's dangling partly over blue water, partly in front of some background reef. To do a subtle Photoshop job on that would be a bit of a pain... for me, anyway! This messy job took about 30 seconds.
CRW_9675.CRW.jpg

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Edited by Simon Rogerson, 07 January 2010 - 04:30 AM.


#5 segon

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 05:03 PM

Thank you! I really appreciate it. I enjoy photographing people underwater. Unfortunately finding a model is tough work. Well, last year my wife got certified. I am going to train her to be my model this summer. There is no way to convince her to go diving 62 degree cold Bermuda water in winter :good:

While the water is cold and clear I keep shooting wide angle only. I guess there will be plenty of time for macro work in summer.

One more question on shooting with fisheye. I took this picture 2 weeks ago diving in Bermuda. 112 feet down. When I published this picture on Facebook, I got lots of questions from my buddies. "Where did you find this humongous lion fish?" Well, I like this picture but it's not telling the truth. Of course this was a normal size fish. I did this on purpose with my fisheye thinking people would realized that this is just a weird angle. Apparently not. So, the picture is not telling the true story. Is it normal in photography world?

Posted Image

Edited by segon, 02 February 2010 - 05:09 PM.


#6 Steve Williams

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Posted 02 February 2010 - 05:23 PM

Yes Segon, it's normal. I think you may be headed for trouble though. "I am going to train my wife" Sorry this will never work. You might, if you're lucky, have your beautiful wife agree to grace your images. :good:
You can explain to her that the picture would look much better with her in it.
You can tell her that the light would be better if she could face toward the strobe so you can see her great eyes.
You can, if you're really lucky, agree on some hand signals so she can be in the best position to look great.

You cannot under any circumstances "train her". This idea is frought with failure. Trust me on this one.

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#7 crawdad

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 06:21 AM

Distortion of foreground objects and near far tomfoolery are part of the fun of a fisheye lens.

Your photos look great per what others have said. I like the background a little darker but that can be hard to do sometimes.

What camera are you using?
Canon S90, FIX90, dual Inon D2000 strobes, Inon UCL165AD, Inon UFL165AD, Inon UWL100 plus dome, Fisheye UWL-04, DIY tray, adapter

Swim down, swim around, swim back up.

http://www.uwphotogr...guide.com/forum

#8 segon

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 03:22 PM

Distortion of foreground objects and near far tomfoolery are part of the fun of a fisheye lens.

Your photos look great per what others have said. I like the background a little darker but that can be hard to do sometimes.

What camera are you using?


Thanks! Fisheye is great! I am having lots of fun with it.

I am using 7-years old Canon Powershot S45 with INON S2000 strobe.
I am moving to dSLR. I got Nikon D90 last year, but no budget for housing yet. I probably will buy a second INON S2000 strobe and a set of arms for my Canon S45.
I know it is not worth it but I should be able to transfer strobes and arms to dSLR setup later this year.