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Fuji S2 TTL + New 10.5mm


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#1 giftie

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Posted 14 October 2003 - 01:33 PM

Hi DSLR guys...

yep, decided to take the plunge...switching over to almost-no-shutter-lag realm.

Have to make a decision, either S2 or D100, the only major advantage I see for the S2 is TTL.

Are you guys really using TTL with the Fuji? Do you use it in wide angle, just macro? Do you use it at all?

Also, I am considering (in addition to the 12-24 DX and 60 micro) the new 10.5 Dx, anyone had a go with this lens yet? Worth the money? Must say that I loved the Inon Dome.

Jorge
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#2 james

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Posted 14 October 2003 - 01:46 PM

Hi Giftie,

The 10.5DX fisheye isn't available yet, but should be soon (I am guessing before xmas).

Yes, the TTL works. I use it for macro about 1/2 the time but not for wide angle. Here are some macro shots using TTL and the 105:

http://www.reefpix.org/gallery/album34

Cheers
James
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#3 frogfish

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Posted 14 October 2003 - 10:57 PM

I use TTL for wide-angle much of the time, and almost always for macro.

The biggest advantage of TTL for wide-angle, IMHO, is the ability to control both strobes output while bracketing by adjusting the flash compensation control on the housing. Bracketing effective strobe power while shooting manual strobe requires adjusting the power settings on each strobe. Assuming both strobes are mounted on long strobe arms on each side of the housing (as they should be for w/a), this is rarely really feasible when shooting animals or fish, though it can be done for static reef scenics.

Using TTL requires a relatively close subject that occupies a substantial portion of the frame, but this limitation also applies to shooting TTL with a film SLR.
I've found that w/a TTL on the S2 needs -0.5 to -1.0 flash exposure compensation; I use one of those settings as a starting point for bracketing the flash exposure.

This Barramundi cod (Cromileptes altivelis), shot with the 17-35 mm zoom, is an example of an ideal subject for w/a TTL.

Posted Image

In contrast, this shot of two Moorish idols (Zanclus cornutus) needed manual strobe control - the main subjects don't fill enough of the frame to generate a good return to the TTL sensor, and there isn't anything else big enough or close enough in the background to help. Using TTL here would have probably blown out the light-colored areas on the Moorish idols.

Posted Image

Here's some more shots, including both macro and w/a, using the Fuji S2, most (but not all) of which were shot using TTL.

Komodo - Fuji S2

Robert Delfs
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#4 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 15 October 2003 - 12:17 AM

I have had the 10.5mm on order for a couple of months. Nikon Uk had originally talked about a 2nd week of October release (already) but are now talking about November.

IMO, this lens will really push F-mount DSLRs ahead of the other cropped sensor DSLRs.

Alex

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#5 Alex_Mustard

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Posted 15 October 2003 - 12:21 AM

I also think that TTL is way to go with close-ups and fish shots (following Robert's rules, above). I also regularly use TTL for wide angle on 35mm, but can't use it for WA with my D100. But even if i could i doubt i would - because manual strobes are easy to control and offer more control with instant LCD feedback.

When I shoot with two strobes for WA, I think that manual is preferable. This is because (when everything is optimal) TTL will provide the correct amount of light for an average exposure. And this light will be split equally between the two strobes. This is fine if your subject is in the centre of the frame, parallel to the camera and equidistant from the strobes. But if your subject isn't then a more even light can be achieved by having your two guns on different powers.

For example this image shows a diver looking at a spawning gorgonian (the white dots are eggs not backscatter - bit hard to see in this low res image). I used my lower strobe to light the gorg and my upper strobe to light the diver. The upper strobe was set two stops brighter than the lower strobe - so that the diver was lit even though he was much further from the camera than the gorg. TTL would have over exposed the gorg and underexposed the diver.

Posted Image

I find most subjects benefit from having the strobes on different powers - either to provide even light or two allow creative lighting and shadows.

Alex

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Nikon D4 (Subal housing). Olympus EPL-5 (waiting for housing).


#6 giftie

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Posted 15 October 2003 - 01:51 AM

Many Thanks guys.

Jorge
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