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Microscopes and dSLRs


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#1 Ethan

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 09:27 AM

Hi again. Sticking with the microscopic photography subject and shooting zooplankton, I'm hoping that someone has advice on a type/brand of microscope to buy that is around $1000 or under. Bill, maybe you know of a few? The adapters for Canon dSLRs you suggested in the last thread are just the right thing.

Ethan

#2 bvanant

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 11:58 AM

Hi again. Sticking with the microscopic photography subject and shooting zooplankton, I'm hoping that someone has advice on a type/brand of microscope to buy that is around $1000 or under. Bill, maybe you know of a few? The adapters for Canon dSLRs you suggested in the last thread are just the right thing.

Ethan

Look on ebay for precision world. They have both binocular compound scopes and some pretty good dissecting scopes for under $500 each. Depending on what size/type of zooplankton you are looking at, I would think that having both would be helpful. Make sure that your scope can do both brighttfield and darkfield viewing. Understand that you won't be getting Zeiss quality at that price but for getting images, the Amscopes are OK. In our lab we use B&L for dissecting scopes and a variety of zeiss and nikon compound scopes but they are all $5K to $10K each.

Bill

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#3 Ethan

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 09:34 AM

Look on ebay for precision world. They have both binocular compound scopes and some pretty good dissecting scopes for under $500 each. Depending on what size/type of zooplankton you are looking at, I would think that having both would be helpful. Make sure that your scope can do both brighttfield and darkfield viewing. Understand that you won't be getting Zeiss quality at that price but for getting images, the Amscopes are OK. In our lab we use B&L for dissecting scopes and a variety of zeiss and nikon compound scopes but they are all $5K to $10K each.

Bill

Much appreciated Bill!

#4 vetdiver

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 09:43 AM

(Bill, how did I know it would be you and I answering this??)

In our labs, we use Olympus binocular scopes with Nikon cameras - I have used Olympus, Nikon, and Zeiss scopes - it's really the glass that makes the difference on the scope, just like on a camera. Do you have any idea what magnification(s) you'll require?

It may also be worth contacting some of the optical service guys local to you - I used this kind of connection to get a line on a personal scope (lightly used, from a lab - you can generally get detailed info on it from the service guy/gal) in the past. Yes, I am that kind of nerd - with a microscope at home and in the market for a second one! I do have a contact out here in So Cal, let me know if you'd like their info - I can PM it to you.

Best -

Allison

Edited by vetdiver, 04 March 2010 - 09:44 AM.

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#5 Ethan

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 09:02 AM

Thanks Allison and I appreciate your nerdiness! I'd also appreciate your contact info there in SoCal. I'm new at microphotography, as is rather obvious, but I'm hoping to shoot things such as crustacean larvae, fish larvae, coral larvae, etc. So, I won't need a huge amount of magnification. Whatever the case, thanks again for your input!

Ethan

#6 bvanant

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 09:58 AM

(Bill, how did I know it would be you and I answering this??)

In our labs, we use Olympus binocular scopes with Nikon cameras - I have used Olympus, Nikon, and Zeiss scopes - it's really the glass that makes the difference on the scope, just like on a camera. Do you have any idea what magnification(s) you'll require?

It may also be worth contacting some of the optical service guys local to you - I used this kind of connection to get a line on a personal scope (lightly used, from a lab - you can generally get detailed info on it from the service guy/gal) in the past. Yes, I am that kind of nerd - with a microscope at home and in the market for a second one! I do have a contact out here in So Cal, let me know if you'd like their info - I can PM it to you.

Best -

Allison

I think we buy our used scopes from the same guys. But I think your definition of "lightly used" is probably a bit different than ours. We bought one lightly used scope from our local Zeiss scope guy that clearly had been used with lots and lots of preserved samples it still smelled like formalin and the paint was missing in a bunch of places, but the optics were OK. Now thankfully we can actually buy new ones.

Bill

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#7 vetdiver

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 11:53 AM

We bought one lightly used scope from our local Zeiss scope guy that clearly had been used with lots and lots of preserved samples it still smelled like formalin and the paint was missing in a bunch of places, but the optics were OK



Bill - HEY!! What's wrong with smelling like formalin????? :drink: Every once in a while, you can find one a vet or med student is reselling (some schools require the students ot own one) - these are generally a great buy, since they are often quite lightly used. I went to UF, and I can try to find out if they still require them - there was a flurry of lightly used Nikons and Olys for sale every year right around graduation....


Ethan - you are most welcome to the nerdiness. If you're just looking for maybe a 4x or 10x lens (I'd recommend at least 4 and 10, even maybe a 20x in addition to the scope's internal, which is generally 10 or so - Bill, what do you think??), you'll probably get some nice stuff....and you can always get better lenses later. Good luck! One day, I should probably get off my lazy butt and cart some seawater into work with me, eh? God knows I do enough dawn patrol/pre-work diving.
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#8 Andy Davies

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 03:13 AM

I picked up a Zeiss Standard 16 with trinocular head on Ebay for 320. You will need an Olympus photo lens which sell for around 70 and an adapter to connect the camera to the photo tube. I use this set up for plankton etc.

Andy

#9 HDVdiver

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Posted 15 May 2010 - 06:08 PM

Can anyone comment on the suitability of an Olympus CH2 binocular microscope for use with a Canon 5D2 (for video of Plankton)?

If so, what adaptor and/or lens would you recommend? I haven't used a microscope for a long, long time...

#10 bvanant

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 02:58 PM

Can anyone comment on the suitability of an Olympus CH2 binocular microscope for use with a Canon 5D2 (for video of Plankton)?

If so, what adaptor and/or lens would you recommend? I haven't used a microscope for a long, long time...

The CH2 is a good scope, well built. I haven't tried shooting video through a scope, but i think if you can maintain the focus things should be fine. Amazon has an adapter from EM scope at $100 or so.
Bill

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www.blueviews.net


#11 HDVdiver

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 03:07 PM

Thanks for the info. I'll check out Amazon.

#12 Andy Davies

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Posted 24 May 2010 - 06:44 AM

The camera attaches to the trinocular tube without having a camera lens attached. You will need a photo eyepiece such as those made by Olympus which fits into the trinocular tube. The camera height is then adjusted to give you the best field of view.

Hope this helps

Andy Davies

#13 Caspir

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 01:33 PM

Really useful info!
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