Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Visual signs of climate change and human impact on oceans


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Snappy

Snappy

    Moray Eel

  • Industry
  • PipPip
  • 98 posts
  • Location:Oslo, Norway

Posted 09 April 2010 - 04:05 AM

I'm looking to find places where it is possible to see how climate change and human activity is adversely affecting the oceans.

In mainstream media it would seem there is a lot of focus on the very obvious effects climate change will have on human beings in low laying countries such as Bangladesh. But I have a feeling that since what is below the waters surface isn't obvious and direct, it is very much forgotten. Yet so many people depend on the oceans to survive.

Hoping to do a project on this I would be greatful if anyone has information to share on the following:

- first hand experience seeing the effects of either climate change or adverse human activity in specific (underwater) locations (preferably possible to photograph)
- names of institutions or professionals that work with this.

thanks

Fredrik
website
Norwegian snapper who prefers warm waters.

#2 danielandrewclem

danielandrewclem

    Eagle Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 380 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts
  • Interests:writing, photography, fish

Posted 09 April 2010 - 05:27 AM

One product of climate change that can be demonstrated through certain types of images is the acidification of the oceans. This can be visualized through micrographs of shelled organisms whose shells (especially in larval stages) are weakened by the acidified seawater.

This article has a nice example of young bivalves whose shells are weakened by a decrease in pH.

http://www.seattleme...-oceans-0310/3/
Flickr 5D Mk II & 20D | Ikelite

#3 MikeO

MikeO

    Great White

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1025 posts
  • Location:Fairfax, VA, USA

Posted 09 April 2010 - 10:27 AM

Another thing that is fairly easy to see through graphical representation is the size of the "dead zones" in many areas due to the increase in nitrogen run-off from agricultural fertilizers and waste. Not necessarily climate change, but certainly human activity. You can also see visual evidence on this in alga blooms. I do know that there have been videos taken of the dearth of life in these areas as well. A good place to start might be Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia...._zone_(ecology)

Mike

Mike Oelrich
Canon EOS 40D in Seatool housing, 100mm macro, Tokina 10-17, INON Z-240s.


#4 Glasseye Snapper

Glasseye Snapper

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 562 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Edmonton, Canada
  • Interests:Fish ID & behaviour and photos thereof

Posted 15 April 2010 - 06:08 PM

On land there are very visually compelling images comparing early 20th century photographs of glaciers with modern pictures taken from exactly the same vantage point. Maybe you can find pioneer underwater photographers, perhaps right here on wetpixel, with images of pristine reefs from several decades ago taken at spots that can be found again. Then retake those pictures for side-by-side comparisons.

Bart
Olympus OM-D EM5/Nauticam, 12-50mm & 60mm macro
Sea&Sea 110a, iTorch, GoPro3 BE

#5 Snappy

Snappy

    Moray Eel

  • Industry
  • PipPip
  • 98 posts
  • Location:Oslo, Norway

Posted 18 April 2010 - 12:38 PM

Thanks for your input. Got me started :-)
website
Norwegian snapper who prefers warm waters.