Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

intova iss 2000 budget strobe - worth $130?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 mboard182

mboard182

    Hermit Crab

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Location:seattle

Posted 11 May 2010 - 03:03 PM

Hi,

I'm currently using an olympus stylus 1020 w/ case and am looking for the least expensive way to improve the color plus reduce backscatter in my photos.

Without a strobe, I understand my options as a) shoot no-flash only in daylit shallows, b) light with dive torches + no flash, or c) use the built in flash but limit to macro

From what I understand adding a strobe (with proper use, as always) would help both the color / backscatter problems.

I'd like to get more into underwater photography, but know I will have to buy a better camera (the stylus has manual iso, but no aperture priority mode, etc, etc) - at that time I would be spending a lot of money and would be more willing to go for an enthusiast setup. So right now I am most interested in some bang for the least buck.

I'm not finding any real details on the intova... I see it supports the *camera's* TTL flash, eg you can set it to still fire for the actual frame, however i can't tell if it will itself TTL flash.

If it won't TTL flash, I'm worried it won't do me much good as my camera will auto adjust for the built in flash (which, in this case is necessarily not covered and thus giving backscatter as well) and then the shot will be overexposed with the larger flash from the intova?

I'm know there is lots to the picture I'm not getting, but I'd greatly appreciate your thoughts on

a) using a flash with the stylus (no aperture priority or manual mode)
b) your review of the intova iss 2000 if you have experienced it
c) thoughts on what differences I would notice in the $175 intova + fiber cable vs the $350 sea&sea ys-17 + cable setup

Thanks!

As a side note: I'm a seattle native, so 99% of my diving is in lower-vis (eg 'high backscatter' water). I'm heading to Hawaii soon, though and I'm considering getting the flash asap to be able to improve the vacation photos I'll be taking...

Edited by mboard182, 11 May 2010 - 04:30 PM.


#2 dirtydave

dirtydave

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 40 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Papua Indonesia

Posted 11 May 2010 - 10:51 PM

The fiber optic hookup will completely block the cameras flash, using it only as a trigger. You will eliminate the backscatter completely if you aim the strobe correctly. I had an Oly 770 in housing using an Epoque ds150 flash and it worked well. Only went to a DSLR rig after I gained lots of experience with the Oly and decided I would get into the hobby in a big($) way! :lol:

Try out a cheap strobe, its way better than the built in flash.

#3 mboard182

mboard182

    Hermit Crab

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Location:seattle

Posted 12 May 2010 - 10:29 PM

The fiber optic hookup will completely block the cameras flash, using it only as a trigger.


well, that is how most stock hookups do it. Note that there is no need for it to be that way. Any mount that positions the fiber so it sees the flash would work.

My question, specific to the iss2000, is whether it does the TTL flash. If it does not, am I correct that the picture will then be overexposed since the camera auto-calibrated (fstop and/or iso) based on only ambient, then took the frame with full flash?

Thanks!

#4 dirtydave

dirtydave

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 40 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Papua Indonesia

Posted 13 May 2010 - 01:14 PM

I have no experience with the Inon flash (but it does have a good reputation. You will have to block the camera's flash in any case or you will have terrible backscatter. I some times used black electrical tape if the fibre optic mask let out too much light.

#5 JackConnick

JackConnick

    Orca

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1210 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Seattle, WA
  • Interests:Sailing, diving, women, cats

Posted 13 May 2010 - 01:26 PM

The Intova 2000 is a basic strobe. I sold a slightly updated model for about a year from UltraMax the OEM. It is manual only with 4 power settings.

Reports from users were that it was ok, but it only has a 60 degree beam and is bulky and very buoyant.

The 2000 is an older design. It does not have a sealed battery compartment, if it floods, it's toast.

I would look at a better strobe. If you want TTL there is also the new Sea & Sea YS-01, much wider beam angle, power, adjustablity and a target light.

Jack
Jack Connick
Optical Ocean Sales.com Sea & Sea, Olympus, Ikelite, Athena, Zen, Fix, Nauticam, Aquatica, Gates, 10Bar, Light & Motion, iTorch/I-DAS & Fantasea Line -
Cameras, Housings, Strobes, Arms, Trays & Accessories

Blog & Gallery: Optical Ocean: Above & Below
Flickr Gallerys: Optical Ocean on Flickr

#6 gillie

gillie

    Starfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Perth Western Australia

Posted 13 May 2010 - 08:52 PM

The Intova 2000 is a basic strobe. I sold a slightly updated model for about a year from UltraMax the OEM. It is manual only with 4 power settings.

Reports from users were that it was ok, but it only has a 60 degree beam and is bulky and very buoyant.

The 2000 is an older design. It does not have a sealed battery compartment, if it floods, it's toast.

I would look at a better strobe. If you want TTL there is also the new Sea & Sea YS-01, much wider beam angle, power, adjustablity and a target light.

Jack


I am using the 2000 at the moment, No TTL capacity, just fibre optic trigger, using it with a Canon G9 in the ikelite housing and the whole deal is just slightly negative in the water, the battery cap is well sealed with 2 O rings, when for a dive on the weekend to 23mtrs and after the dive found i had left the cap only half screwed in, but no water entry into the strobe. It has been a good package for me to start with on the Canon housing but now i have TTL capacity i might start looking at a better strobe :-)

#7 mboard182

mboard182

    Hermit Crab

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Location:seattle

Posted 13 May 2010 - 10:50 PM

No TTL capacity


great, thanks all for the replies. It looks like the verdict on the iss2000 is no TTL, and you get what you pay for :lol:

-

Per the original post, I am still trying to understand what the result of using a non-TTL flash with this camera (TTL, only auto-aperture/shutter).

My logic say that the picture would be very overexposed since the aperture and shutter time would be calibrated based on the less-intense ambient (or built-in flash if not blocked) lighting.

However with no experience here I'm hoping someone can answer definitively.

Thanks!

#8 Intova

Intova

    Brine Shrimp

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 27 May 2010 - 09:00 AM

The ISS2000 is a non-TTL strobe slave that is one of the best values for a flash unit on the market. The four power settings plus a diffuser (to further soften the output) allow the user to adjust the flash for optimum camera exposure. The best way to perfect this is by testing and familiarizing oneself with the various flash settings in different underwater depths and conditions (e.g. visibility range due to ambient light or clarity of the water. Spending 2 times or more money on a TTL flash unit can make it easier to take photos; but with a little practice on a non-TTL strobe like the ISS2000, you can get great underwater photos that are perfectly exposed. Using a strobewill greatly improve the color of your photos and eliminate the problem of backscatter.

There are other ways to improve color and reduce/eliminate backscatter without using the flash. One of the most effective is manual white balance, which should be reset at every 10 feet of depth. to help compensate for the loss of warm colors such as red, orange and yellow. A red filter can also help add these colors back into your image. Using a flash diffuser will help eliminate backscatter when using a cameras internal flash. All in all however, an external strobe is one of the best accessories to purchase for improving your underwater photography. It will add light, bring back natural colors and eliminate backscatter.