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Anemone in Fiji


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#1 jimbo1946

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 05:11 AM

The Critter ID forum is a fabulous idea! Here's an anemone that I photographed in the Vatu-I-Ra Channel in Fiji last year. The dive crew had only seen a couple of these, and I can't find it in the Indo-Pacific Coral Reef Field Guide. Has anyone else seen one of these?

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#2 Cybergoldfish

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 05:20 AM

Never seen this coloUr variation but we have a black version in Seychelles - They are walking anemonae, generally more active during the night. During daylight they are wedged inside cracks in the reef and are often unnoticed.

#3 jimbo1946

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 05:37 AM

They are walking anemonae...

Thanks, Bob, I never knew anemone could be mobile. That could explain the dive guide saying that he had seen two or three of them. He may have been seeing the same one.
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#4 Cybergoldfish

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 05:45 AM

I never knew anemone could be mobile.

This is how smaller anemonae get onto the shells of decorator crabs. I watched a time lapse video of this some years ago - Fascinating! :huh:

#5 jimbo1946

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 07:49 AM

Believe it or not, I just recently learned that crinoids move around, so it shouldn't have surprised me that anemones can move too.

Thanks for the info!
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#6 craig

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 08:26 AM

Boy, do they! Especially at Komodo. They have crinoid olympics there.
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#7 scubamarli

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 11:27 AM

This looks like a corallimorph, rather than an anemone. Similar to an anemone, but a bit more primitive on the evolutionary ladder.
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#8 jimbo1946

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 01:41 PM

Thanks, Marli, I learn something new every day! I'll try researching corallimorphs now instead of anemomes and see if I can find it.
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#9 Art

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Posted 31 October 2003 - 01:50 PM

Hi there !
Marli may have right, compare your anemone with Corallimorphus sp. in Colin & Arneson, 1995, p. 134
the colour is a bit different, but otherwise it's exactly the same !
colour variations in anemones and corallimorpharians are commom
cheers
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#10 jimbo1946

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 06:49 PM

Thanks, Art. I don't have that book, but I'll see if any of our dive friends do.

Jim
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#11 scubamarli

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 07:22 PM

I found a reference on this corallimorph: it is also found in Indonesia (I found it at Celebes Divers Edge of the Reef website.) It is an undescribed Pseudocorynactis sp. It is related to the Caribbean Orange Ball "Anemone".

Marli
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#12 scubamarli

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Posted 01 November 2003 - 07:24 PM

Me again...also it is in Coral Reef Animals of the Indo Pacific (Gosliner, Behrens and Williams) but it's lighter in colour.
Marli
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