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#1 Scubysnaps

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 02:35 PM

I've had a monitor calibrator for about 3-6 months now, Huey pro, I'm not really convinced. Anyone else?
Cheers
Paul

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#2 Timmoranuk

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 08:33 AM

I've had a monitor calibrator for about 3-6 months now, Huey pro, I'm not really convinced. Anyone else?


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#3 rtrski

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 02:18 PM

I don't print much, but I recently realized that my shots coming out of DXO Optics were looking VERY different in its viewer than in ACDSee Pro 3's viewer. I could side-by-side the windows and see a huge difference in tone, although both were set to assume the same (sRGB) colorspace.

Turns out one didn't have the right monitor profile set. Fixed that, and both images looked the same.

Unfortunately after uploading to flickr they no longer look like they do locally. Probably a browser color space issue?

Now while that doesn't answer the whole "does the monitor calibration really get it RIGHT" part...it does argue to me that some sort of standard will strongly influence your happiness with your print results.

Current rig: Sony SLT-alpha55 in Ikelite housing, Sigma 105mm f2.8 DC Macro w/ Ike 5505.58 flat port or Sigma 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 DC HSM behind UWCamStuff custom 5" mini-dome. Dual INON z240 Type IVs triggered with DS51 for TTL mimicry, or DS51 alone with home-made ringflash assy for macro.

 

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#4 Scubysnaps

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 02:47 PM

one thing that didn't convince me, id that I did a reboot recently shortly after a calibration, onto the black and white screen, yet it wasnt black and white, it was black and a whiter shade of pink! hmmm
Cheers
Paul

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#5 Bentoni

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 07:24 PM

I have been a photojournalist at a northern California newspaper for 13 years. Photos go through the hands (and monitors) of the photographers, the photo editors, the lab techs, and eventually to the presses. There seemed an obvious need to control color fidelity throughout the process, and several years ago the paper spent $10 million to upgrade the presses and the entire color management system. The upgrade included hiring the expertise of a Color Management consultant who spoke about IPTC profiles, 'device-independent color space' vs. 'device-dependent color space,' dot-gain, undercolor removal, and the various merits of LAB, Adobe RGB, sRGB, and the myriad ways of converting to CMYK. It made us all dizzy. The photographers here all use Apple Cinema displays and we used Colormunki to calibrate them. But then the Lab techs convert the files to CMYK, and the press operators tweak the ink on the presses and output the photos onto crappy paper racing through an offset press. If the color didn't look right, who could tell where the system failed?

My humble opinion is that color management is a complex concept that can easily confuse smart people, but smarter people should not waste much of their time on it. Every monitor's color will drift a little from the moment you turn it on. Some more than others. Even after calibration it won't be long before you'll need to calibrate again. We calibrated 15 identical monitors at the same time, and our test image file still looked slightly different on each. There are so many variables that were out of our control that the entire process was an exercise in chasing our collective tail. Color Management is much more an art than a science, and the vagueness of art reigns.

If you are working in a closed system your camera, your monitor, and your output device it should not be much trouble to get things to print with reasonable predictability. Make sure you are using the same color space throughout your workflow; Photo Mechanic, Camera Raw, Photoshop, Lightroom, Adobe Bridge ...whatever you're using. I use an Epson inkjet printer at home, and I use the ColorSync app that came free with my Mac to 'calibrate' my monitor. I followed the "Advanced" steps (which are simple) and my prints never surprise me. If I send files out to be printed on someone else's printer I try to get an IPTC profile for their printer and I soft-proof it. You can do this with most good commercial print houses, and even Costco.

Sorry for the rant, but I spent a lot of time studying this and eventually realized I had been spinning my wheels. Be smarter than me.
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#6 tdpriest

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 03:28 AM

I've had a monitor calibrator for about 3-6 months now, Huey pro, I'm not really convinced. Anyone else?


I think that the Huey Pro isn't a fully specified system, in that it creates consistency within the local network: camera-monitor-printer, but doesn't match to an external standard.

My personal difficulty has always been matching the screen gamma to the printer output; I rather suspect that the difference between emission from monitor pixels and reflection from a print (even using one paper and the same artificial lighting exclusively) are always going to make this a problem.

Tim

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#7 Autopsea

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 06:31 AM

I agree with Randall, It's just not possible to find THE solution, don't waste too much time on this.

#8 diver dave1

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 01:40 PM

Prior to using Spyder, Prints did not match the monitor well - giving poor prints. After using Spyder, the results between monitor and prints are quite close. I use a professional print shop, not a home printer. The prints have matched the monitor using 2 different shops.

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#9 cdoyal

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 01:47 PM

Prior to using Spyder, Prints did not match the monitor well - giving poor prints. After using Spyder, the results between monitor and prints are quite close. I use a professional print shop, not a home printer. The prints have matched the monitor using 2 different shops.


Ditto. I use an old Spyder 2 and download profiles for the printers I send my photo to such as mpix.com. Every print looks great.
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#10 Spacker

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Posted 21 February 2011 - 03:10 PM

I purchased a Spyder3 studio kit. My friends have all benefited from it. One thing I'd found is that using the monitor calibration and receiving images from a friends dell to my, as yet uncalibrated mac screen is that I can see details in the blacks that he can't. Surely a calibrated display should show information that exists in the image. Personally I'm unconvinced of the benefits outside of in-house printing.

#11 TimG

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 01:32 AM

I'm sure this issue has moved on since the last post in 2011 - or maybe it hasn't?

 

I'm using a 27" iMac (2014 model) and a 2014 MacBookPro. Both terrific. I keep wondering if I should calibrate them other than just using the Apple software provided. I do no printing from them but do send lots of images to Alamy and Shutterstock.

 

Am I bad? Should I calibrate? Do I plunge for a Spyder4? Shall I save my cash?

 

I'd welcome your thoughts......


Tim
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#12 adamhanlon

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Posted 28 May 2015 - 12:38 AM

Hey Tim,

 

I reviewed the Spyder 5 here:

 

http://wetpixel.com/...ibration-system

 

I think the only way to guarantee consistent color is by calibrating and keeping calibrated.

 

Long term, this should result in more stock sales...

 

Adam


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#13 TimG

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Posted 28 May 2015 - 01:34 AM

Thanks Adam, this is really helpful. Sorry I didn't spot your review earlier!

 

Hello Amazon..... 


Tim
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#14 watboy

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Posted 09 June 2015 - 01:18 AM

Long time lurker here, think I can shed some insight into this topic. I've been calibrating my home theater and computer displays for some time. The thing to know about meters is that there are basically 2 types. The cheaper ones are tri-stimulus colorimeters. They have 3 sensors behind 3 different color gels, are relatively inexpensive, take fast readings, especially for low light levels. However, due to the way they measure color, the type of the display matters. A CRT, LCD, LED, OLED could each be displaying a different color, but to a tri-stimulus meter, it would look the same. Cheaper colorimeters are also effected by temperature and the gels deteriorate over time. A Spectrophotometer / Spectroradiometer measure the spectrum directly, and its reading does not depend on the type of display. However, they are more expensive ($1000 for the X-Rite EyeOne Pro), and excluding the ones that cost as much as a car, have difficulty measuring low light levels.

 

What many people (or just calibration nerds) do is have both a colorimeter and a spectrophotometer. You reference the colorimeter vs the spectrophotometer for each display and create offsets. Then you calibrate your displays using the colorimeter. I used to just use a colorimeter, but post calibration, my Laptop, desktop and plasma HDTV would still look very different from each other. With the addition of the spectrophotometer, I can now get consistent color across all my displays. 

 

This is a more involved and costlier calibration, but once you've gotten used to correct color, its hard to go back. Some software packages come built in with colorimeter offset tables for different types of displays or even specific display models, but colorimeters will drift overtime. To start off, I would recommend the X-Rite i1 Display 3 Pro colorimeter, its quite accurate with minimal drift, but a bit more expensive than the Spider5. 

 

I use an X-Rite i1Display 3 Pro and an X-Rite EyeOne Pro. In utter marketing confusion, they are pronounced "Eye One Display 3 Pro" and "Eye One Pro 2" For software, I use CalMan.

 

A good summary of the different technology used and meters out there

http://www.curtpalme...pic.php?t=11436

 

This is just to get the displays to show consistent color. When I want to subject myself to more pain, I may start dabbling with calibrating my camera. I don't print, so don't need to subject myself to the horrors of managing that.


Edited by watboy, 09 June 2015 - 02:06 AM.


#15 TimG

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 06:33 AM

A very kind birthday gift.... and I now have a SpyderPro5.

 

As Adam outlined in his review, very easy to install - and easy to run a calibration. Checking the before and after, I found the image on my iMac warmer than the pre-calibration version. I also installed the software on my MacBook Pro and calibrated that too. Again, easy. Not sure I can see a real difference on that - but I feel now, at least, that I have done due diligence and that's about as calibrated as this individual can get things.

 

Let's see how it goes.....


Tim
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Nikon D800, Nikkors 105mm and 16-35mm, Sigma 15mmFE - Subal housing