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#1 cor

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 11:38 AM

Hey all, Ive got a tank at home that i havent used in 10 years. It's basically new, maybe had 20 dives, been used as an air duster (with 1 filling for that 10 years). But now it's nearly empty, so im wondering what to do with it. Id like to just have it filled, but obviously thats not an option in its current state as hydro is 10 years old :)

So, would it be possible to have a tank thats been out of hydro for 10 years to be inspected? Or would that be really unsafe? It looks brand new on the outside, but no idea what the inside is like. Probably fine as it's been in a dry room for those 10 years. I dont want to dive with it, just fill it.
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#2 ChrigelKarrer

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 12:39 PM

Hi Cor,
i strongly suggest that you bring the tank to your local dive shop or the filling station.
They will open the tank to see how he's looking inside and hydrotest them.
No serious dive operator or filling station will risk a exploding tank of a (more than) due hydrotesting.
If you go diving or not don't make any difference as the overpressure valve,the neck o-ring or the tank itself may
blow up while filling or even worster in your car....

Chris

Edited by ChrigelKarrer, 25 December 2010 - 12:41 PM.

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#3 cor

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 12:41 PM

I obviously would not fill it and hopefully no filling station would let me. Im asking it it can still be hydrod after being expired for 10 years. Or if im better off just buying a new tank.
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#4 adamhanlon

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 01:36 PM

Hi Cor,

It can be hydro'ed for sure. We sometimes test and pass 30 year old tanks!

The test is carried out in a water jacket, and measures the expansion/contraction of a tank (permanent set) of a tank that age hardens with use. When tanks fail the test, it is most commonly due to valve thread damage due to being over/under torqued. As far as the metalurgy of the tank is concerned, the number of expansion/contraction cycles is more relevant than just it's age

If it has stood for 10 years and it's last fill was a dry one it should be fine.

Happy Christmas!!!

Adam

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#5 ChrigelKarrer

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 02:19 PM

Sure it can be hydrotested but they may won't because the tank is in a too bad shape inside.
Before hydrotesting somebody have to unscrew the valve and have a look inside, then they will do the hydrotest as Adam described.

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related
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As you did not used the tank so much there should be no problem with hydrotesting and very unliklythe tank will fail the test.
If it's a steel tank filled with humid air or water got in there may be a problem with internal corosion.
Chris

Edited by ChrigelKarrer, 25 December 2010 - 04:02 PM.

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#6 Karl

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 03:02 PM

Yes it can be hydro'd - in Australia a visual inspection is a part of the test so I would assume that it would be the same where you are. If the exterior is good and as you haven't used it much there shouldn't be any rust at all inside it (assuming it's a steelie). If there is some rust they can get rid of it (they do here) conduct the hyro and if it passes no probs.

If it doesn't they were destroy it for you.

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#7 Balrog

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 09:33 AM

Or you could take your life in your hands and fill it using a whip from another tank. Not as scary as it sounds because the pressures will equalise between the tanks giving you only half pressure.
Be good for another 5 years.

#8 cor

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 08:37 AM

To get back to this topic without opening a new one..

In the USVI where I live part of the year Ive got 4 tanks. I just had them visualed, and all 4 are massively leaking from the neck now. Botched up visual inspection right? Very annoying.
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#9 Drew

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 09:01 AM

A visual inspection but not filled and tested for integrity... typical! :)

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#10 ChrigelKarrer

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 10:02 AM

Cor,leaking necks after visual inspection comes mostly fom reusing the same o-ring and/or not cleaning the seat.
As the o-ring is squeezed/pinched and thius hard/compressed from the use before it won't seal well.
If you payed for the inspection have a discussion with first the employee and if no sucess with the shop owner.
If they work this way, how "quality" will be the other things they do...
Chris

Edited by ChrigelKarrer, 07 January 2011 - 10:04 AM.

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#11 adamhanlon

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 10:17 AM

Did they not return the tanks to you full?

After any test, we always fill and then stick the valve/necks into the filling station tank to check for leaks.....

Testing is not standardized world-wide however, and local practices will vary.

Adam

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#12 cor

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 03:25 PM

Adam, they returned them half full. I had them top them off. So that should have given me a hint :) We only used it in the pool, where we noticed the leaks on the neck. I mailed the owner, who we know very well (I did every single one of my certs at their dive shop) so im assuming they'll get things sorted.
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