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Learning from our hunter "friends"


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#1 DerekB

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 02:14 AM

I know that there is some animosity over the spearfishing community, But I think there are a lot of things that we can learn from their techniques in the water that would help improve our photography.

Here are some tricks that I've learned while hanging out with the spearos:

Flashers - Predatory fish love things that sparkle. I have used everything from glueing on reflective tape to my fins to keep large fish around, To dropping spoons to get them curious and in the right spot.

Dusting - Some fish like to eat little bugs and worms that live in the sand. Animals like Rays will chomp down and the sand will plume out of the gills. Smaller fish will come right in to see if there is anything left they can scavenge on. To simulate this all we have to do is toss a little bit of sand up, and fish will come running for lunch.

Tapping rocks- I'm guessing the reef chompers like the Uhu ( parrot fish) make some noise when grinding on the reef. Tap two rocks together and you're mimicking the sound, other fish will come on in to see whats so tasty.

Grunting - Many types of fish will grunt when another fish is entering their territory. Capitalize on the fish's curious nature to get them to check you out.


But I think the biggest thing that I have learned from the spearos is how to blend in with the environment. Using the terrain, staying still, and for god sake, NO bubbles. Unless you are a freediver, you would never imagine how most fish feel uncomfortable with the bubbles of a scuba tank.

Edited by DerekB, 30 May 2011 - 01:27 PM.


#2 tdpriest

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 03:14 AM

There's considerable debate in the wildlife photographic community about environmental disturbance in the interest of getting an image: UWP 57 has an article on this debate. You may expect controversy!

Tim

:)

#3 DerekB

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 12:38 PM

controversy is good, I would like to see where most draw the line then. The techniques that I mentioned don't harm the animal or abituate them to change their behavior around us, just capitalizes on fish's curiosity.

#4 Blade305

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Posted 30 May 2011 - 01:12 PM

There might be some people who call that cheating :) ......Those techniques (if at all) should be handled very carefully and not encourage less aware divers two rip out two rocks of the reef to make some noise and attract fish. I guess as long you are taking the spoons back home with you it should be somewhat ok :B): ....I am just trying to say that not everybody is an aware diver and knows how to use common sense. As for the no bubble thing, it will be tough for divers to accomplish that, unless you are using a rebreather or grow some gills.

I apologize if I stepped on anybodies toes with this reply but these are my thoughts.

P.s.: I admire anybody who can hold his breath longer than 2 minutes and still swimming while doing so. Apnoe divers must experience the ultimate freedom as it is perfectly shown in this little short film on the wetpixel home page:
http://wetpixel.com/...d-onto-youtube/

Cheers,

Henrik
Henrik Welle
www.hwelle.net
wavephoto305@gmail.com