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Washed Out Photos


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#1 Jesper64

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 11:02 PM

Hi,

I've just taken my DSLR underwater setup on its maiden dive trip.

Close-up macro shots are working nicely and happy with my first attempts. However, when backing away and taking a wider shot with the macro configuration, I'm getting very washed out pictures.

For example the picture below of the turtle:
untitled_0225.JPG

The front of my lens was probably about a meter (3 ft) or so away from the turtle. It was taken with a Nikon D80, 60mm lens, f8.0, 1/200 sec, ISO 100, centre weighted metering and 1 x Inon Z240 using TTL.

Is the washed out nature of the picture due to the TTL not coping well with the slightly wider field of view? The Z240 should have enough power, I'm assuming, to light a subject at this distance.

Any suggestions for improvements?

Thanks

#2 chrispak1962

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 12:59 AM

H

Edited by chrispak1962, 18 June 2011 - 03:20 AM.


#3 DuncanS

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 02:09 AM

Hi,

I've just taken my DSLR underwater setup on its maiden dive trip.

Close-up macro shots are working nicely and happy with my first attempts. However, when backing away and taking a wider shot with the macro configuration, I'm getting very washed out pictures.

For example the picture below of the turtle:
untitled_0225.JPG

The front of my lens was probably about a meter (3 ft) or so away from the turtle. It was taken with a Nikon D80, 60mm lens, f8.0, 1/200 sec, ISO 100, centre weighted metering and 1 x Inon Z240 using TTL.

Is the washed out nature of the picture due to the TTL not coping well with the slightly wider field of view? The Z240 should have enough power, I'm assuming, to light a subject at this distance.

Any suggestions for improvements?

Thanks


As you back away you are shooting through more water which sucks out contract, saturation and sharpness, hence why we tend to use wide lenses so we can minimise the water column but still fit the subject in. Remember that the strobe light has to travel twice the distance (from strobe to subject and back) Take a look at the histogram of the image you posted. You will notice it is bunched towards the middle. In this situation be a bit more aggressive in post processing / raw development. (i assume you are shooting raw?). I took your jpeg into lightroom, added a little contrast, shifted the black point and boosted the exposure a touch. Total time 10 sec. You will have a lot more room to play with using the raw file.

post_34104_1308380270.jpg

Edited by DuncanS, 18 June 2011 - 02:12 AM.

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#4 davephdv

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 09:47 AM

TTL can work, as long as your subject fills a significant percentage of your image.

You do have to use your EV control though. Look at your image on your LCD and then adjust your EV setting accordingly.

Alternative is to shoot manual and then look at your image and adjust your settings. Either can work.
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#5 Jesper64

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 11:07 PM

Cheers for the tips. I am shooting in raw and can get a more pleasing image by tweaking it as you suggested. I'll keep trying out different EV settings and see how we go. Thanks again.

#6 Panda

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 12:03 AM

It's just that you're too far away from the subject. You are photographing (and lighting) all that water in front of the turtle.

Stick to macro subjects with the macro setup and get closer, like 30cm or less.

With a wide angle or fisheye you could be 30cm away and still capture the whole turtle.

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#7 stevehookem

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 08:13 AM

If you've already converted to jpg, use "Curves" to bring it back. Looks good when fixed!

#8 abc123

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 08:35 PM

i love the turtle

#9 wildviolet78

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Posted 13 July 2011 - 09:03 AM

Hi,

I've just taken my DSLR underwater setup on its maiden dive trip.

Close-up macro shots are working nicely and happy with my first attempts. However, when backing away and taking a wider shot with the macro configuration, I'm getting very washed out pictures.

For example the picture below of the turtle:
untitled_0225.JPG

The front of my lens was probably about a meter (3 ft) or so away from the turtle. It was taken with a Nikon D80, 60mm lens, f8.0, 1/200 sec, ISO 100, centre weighted metering and 1 x Inon Z240 using TTL.

Is the washed out nature of the picture due to the TTL not coping well with the slightly wider field of view? The Z240 should have enough power, I'm assuming, to light a subject at this distance.

Any suggestions for improvements?

Thanks



You can try playing with the exposure and white balance settings in lightroom

#10 tdpriest

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 05:06 AM

The strobes will pump out too much light at a dark subject or dark water in TTL-mode. This gets more likely as you pull back. There's also more backscatter, which you can see as the pale circles in front of the turtle.

Water itself blurs and softens the image (the late Jim Church called this the "Blahs"): your turtle has the blahs, I'm afraid. Turtles demand wide-angle lenses; now!!

Tim

:huh:

Edited by tdpriest, 16 July 2011 - 05:08 AM.


#11 Jesper64

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 04:36 AM

Turtles demand wide-angle lenses; now!!

Tim

:dance:


Done! :( Wide angle lens worked wonders but damn you have to get close.

Sipadan_2011_0405.JPG

#12 derway

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 09:04 AM

Yes, get close, and then get closer. nice!

Edited by derway, 01 August 2011 - 09:04 AM.

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#13 richard.berry58

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 03:07 AM

Use photoshop to get colours back!