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SY Arenui trip report


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#1 gina

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Posted 16 July 2011 - 09:12 AM

Congrats Gina, looks like you sure filled up your wish list with nice images. I just did the slideshow on Flickr and really enjoyed it.

How did you like the boat?


Thank you very much. We were on the Arenui which was nice, but I didn't feel it lived up to the hype. The crew was fantastic, the food was excellent (I'd be surprised if there was anyone on board who didn't bring home a couple extra pounds), and the ability to have an on-board massage was decadent. But the sloped, slippery deck & lounge, and the steep staircases were treacherous, especially if the boat was at all moving. The two pangas were tiny and difficult to gear up in. The four above-deck cabins were plagued with exhaust fumes. We were the first cruise our of drydock and the boat had picked up an assortment of bugs, including lots of roaches, while ashore. One cabin had roaches so bad, possibly related to the broken air conditioner, that they were running across guest's faces at night! Not exactly my idea of a "boutique liveaboard."

All in all my feelings were quite mixed. Do all Indonesian-style sailing boats have such sloped decks? It's such a poor design.

-Gina

Very nice collection images both here and on your flickr.


Thank you, Mark.

-Gina

#2 diver dave1

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 09:29 AM

All in all my feelings were quite mixed. Do all Indonesian-style sailing boats have such sloped decks? It's such a poor design.

I was on the Felicia last year. It had electrical issues at times. I am told using a grounded system is not common in Indonesia but I am certainly no expert.
The deck had some slope and when it had standing water, was slick. But the crew used squeegie's on them all the time which kept them quite satisfactory. I do not recall every seeing any bugs at all. So while far from a perfect ship, it sounded far better than your situation.
Based on the pictures and description, your boat was much more luxurious than then Felicia. Given a choice, I would select the smaller cabin with no roaches but then, who would have known in advance.

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#3 Drew

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 01:49 PM

All in all my feelings were quite mixed. Do all Indonesian-style sailing boats have such sloped decks? It's such a poor design.

Yes, in general the Pinisi design have a sloping front deck, some more sloping than others. Newer ones have a very mild slope depending on who designed and built it.
Generally, the wood decks can be coated with a non-slip coating (some use sand and the coating for added traction). Bare wood decks can be pretty slippery when wet, not to mention wood stains!
Sorry for your experience. I've notified Luigi of Arenui about this report.

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#4 Scarlettisis

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 01:27 AM

Hi Gina...

I'm really surprised about the comments on Arenui...

I've been out on the boat for 2 trips, one in Raja Ampat and one in Komodo. It's by far my favourite boat. I've done some other liveaboards which were promoted as 'luxurious' which were actualy just ordinary, but for Arenui I found it really impressive. We had one of the upper deck rooms (maybe same as yours) and it was so spacious and beautifully decorated...

We were on the 2nd trip that ever went out... then one last year after they were operating for a while. Both times service/facilities were excellent.

I never had any roach problems at all... of course its a tropical country so its not uncommon to get some bugs around, especially near ports. I live in Singapore so know how frustrating bugs can be, but being out at sea means it's rare to get many bugs onboard for long.

I'm also surprised by the comments on the floors... we found the staff super quick to wipe up any water at all, keeping the floors really safe. So not only is someone always waiting for you post-dive to give you a fresh warm towel but they are there to wipe up behind you too :-)

The top sundeck was stunning and i liked the fact that the stairs are wooden not metal as I find metal more risky in rough conditions.... other boats i've been on had really strange layouts which were soemtimes hard to navigate when the boat rocked but for Arenui it was never a problem at all.

And as to the tenders ... they were set-up so nicely for diving. Individual spaces to put your tank and gear and staff helping carry on your extras .... maybe I was spoiled on the Arenui but now I find it hard to imagine diving on another liveaboard where you have to do more for yourself.

Compared to some other boats, often more expensive, I would always choose Arenui... especially for the design as I am fed up with 'metal' modern looking boats... its much nicer to be on a traditional style boat, like a pirate-ship... all wooden. I know they used a lot of reclaimed wood too...

#5 scorpio_fish

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 05:51 AM

I considered our experience on the Arenui to be the best ever on a liveaboard. We were on the boat in April. No roach issues. The food was indeed excellent, the best we've had since the Thai era of the Ocean Rover.

The deck level rooms needed upgraded A/C to keep them cool. This was supposed to happen during this dry dock.

I didn't find the decks slick nor overly sloped, but the Seven Seas has the treated surfaces with texture that make them pretty secure. Some stained floors on wooden boats are like an ice rink.

Smaller Phinisis beam will have an even greater slope.

Edited by scorpio_fish, 19 July 2011 - 05:53 AM.

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#6 Ratings

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 03:04 PM

I happen to have come across some comments about The Arenui that surprised me and wanted to make sure that readers that are considering the boat hear another divers account. Let me first say that I have dived on The Bilikiki in the Solomon Islands and an Aggressor in Turks and Caicos so I do have liveaboard experience. I also have 300 dives.

I took a January 2011 charter on the Arenui and loved it so much in fact that I immediately came home and booked it for this coming December. If that doesn't say I loved it, nothing does. Let me break it down for you. The boat itself is remarkable in comparison to others I've been on. Aesthetically and functionally both. You get the sense that you are staying in a boutique hotel in Ubud, Bali not on a utilitarian fishing vessel. Every square inch is spectacularly beautiful with gorgeous wood carvings and details that you know were lovingly and well thought out. Now if you like plastic chairs or metal, go elsewhere. Yes, the wood creaks a little at night , oh well.

The rooms, the beds, the storage, the bathrooms, the salon…Magnificant. Forget about bunk beds! Not that I spent much time in the bedrooms, all I did was sleep in there. At all other times I was diving, eating (constantly), swapping out batteries & memory cards, sunbathing or reading on the oh so mind blowing upper deck with shower to hose off if I got too hot and a canopy to sit under or an open area for sun to bake my body. Or I was lounging in the salon reading a dive magazine, changing bathing suits, looking at someone else's photos, or sipping on my made to order Latte'. Life doesn't get much better.

The diving? The dive guides? The pangas? Nothing short of spectacular! Let's see, I would rise in the a.m. roll out of bed into my bathing suit, grab a quick bite before jumping in my wetsuit. But not before they came over with a clipboard and asked me what I wanted for breakfast? Are you kidding me? Didn't I just eat breakfast? "oh no, just a snack. How would you like your eggs cooked". Seriously. Okay, so continuing on. I check my camera and make sure it's set up, leave it in a basket and walk over to the Panga. All of my gear is set up and ready to go, all I need to do is walk down a few steps and climb aboard, sit down and wait for them to taxi us out to the site, usually a 3 minute ride tops. Now did I mention that the basket with my camera is also now on the boat? I didn't actually bring it on, they did. Entry is a back roll and getting back on the panga equally a breeze because you just handed them your BC and tank in the water so you're light as a feather on a really nice ladder (wonderful as I was post foot surgery). After the dive I leave all of my gear on the panga, step up a few steps to the shower, peel off my wetsuit and they hand me a dry towel! After every dive! After night dives they bring you a towel and a hot cocoa.

So there you have it. You can use your imagination as to how the rest of the day proceeds. It's just heaven on earth with a staff to match on a boat that exceeded my every expectation. The diving is about as good as it gets anywhere in the world that I've been including Sulawesi, Solomons, Central America, Carribean and more. Beyond words. The trip itself is also just mesmerizingly beautiful as you cruise past all the gorgeous islands and the seas were calm the entire time. There were some strong currents on some dives but nothing we couldn't manage. The Manta dive was so phenomenally out of this world that they brought us back to let us do it again. More Mantas than you can imagine with some stopping at a cleaning station so close we could almost touch them. Not like previous Manta dives on other trips I'd done where they were flying by so fast that I had to whip my head around or miss them, these guys were just hovering! I saw an explosive amount of sea life that included every single thing on my wish list without fail. We had a few excursions including a visit to a village, so sweet and a pearl farm, fabulous. Yes, the trip there is a bit brutal but let me tell you, worth every hot and sweaty airport I had to visit to get there. But by the way, The Arenui even mitigates those issues by having someone every step of the way to help you get through customs and more. There's so much more I can tell you but e-mail me directly if you want…I think you get the picture.

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#7 riskyboy

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 08:24 PM

Hi Gina,

I was surprised to read your comments about the Arenui as I have been on the boat a couple of times now (and have another trip booked for the end of the year). Such a pity that you felt some things weren't quite up to scratch.

Just thought I'd share some of my experience on the boat, because I still can't believe that a liveaboard can be that good! The food as everyone has said is fantastic, and I hear that they have 2 new chefs so the food is going to be even better by the time I get on my next trip in December. The crew are fantastic, very friendly, incredibly helpful.....you really don't need to lift a finger when you are on-board. Hats off to the two cruise directors, Debbie and Jerry, with their detailed dive briefings (plus photos), who both make sure the cruise on the Arenui is a great experience. The boat and cabins are frankly stunning...the quality of the wood, finishing and attention to detail is awesome, and I'm always disappointed when I get back on a boring, generic steel-hulled boat!

On the points you made, I can't really say anything about the bugs as we had no problems at all on our two cruises...I'm just guessing this is probably a one-off problem they may have after dry docking somewhere in Indonesia. Cockroaches are something that you come to accept in tropical countries, they get everywhere- I even have problems with them in my condo in Singapore! However, I wouldn't have thought they would be an issue once they had been cleared out after dry-docking.

Have to say I didn't notice a steep staircase, at least it was no steeper than you would find on other boats! The deck is sloped, but no-one on any of the trips had a problem with it as the crew were very diligent in clearing up any excess water post-dive. Still I would much prefer a sloped deck to be able to dive from an Indonesian Phinisi schooner....as one of the other posters said the curvature really depends on the size of the boat as well. While it's certainly not ideal to exit from a dive through the dining room/lounge, again the crew made sure that any mess was cleared up immediately. The dining room/lounge is so roomy compared to some of the other liveaboards I have been on that I guess a compromise had to be made. I was very happy though to be handed warm/cold towels after a dive or a hot chocolate after a night-dive as soon as I got off one of the tenders!

Talking about the tenders, both of them pretty big for a liveaboard, everyone gets their own seat and space for their dive set-up. As far as I can remember each boat can take at least 10 divers comfortably with additional space for the dive guides and crew - so easily bigger than you would expect for a boat that takes maximum 16 people.

Lastly, I have always stayed in one of the above-deck cabins and never had a problem with exhaust fumes, so hopefully this was a one-off. The aircon was a little spotty, but as one of the other posters said I think those have now been upgraded.

No liveaboards are perfect, but for me this is as close as it gets, and hopefully the next cruise will be even better!

Oh yes, and if someone from the Arenui is reading this.....the boat really needs a hammock ;-)

#8 bversteegh

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 09:23 AM

My wife and I were Arenui passengers on this same trip to Komodo - and had a fantastic experience. We love the boat, crew, and Debbie and Gerry. As Gina stated, the ship was just coming out of dry dock; and due to some travel complications, the normal cruise directors (Debbie and Gerry) weren't able to arrive until several days into the trip. Luigi (the owner) recovered magnificently - hiring Micheal and Helen to fill in until Debbie and Gerry could catch up; and they did an incredible job stepping in at short notice and directing the cruise. Michael provided a wonderful video recapping the voyage at the end of the cruise - it is a keepsake I really appreciate and will always cherish. It was a little hectic the first day - but a boat has challenges that a land based operation doesn't have to deal with. The service on Arenui is really a cut above - I think they have 21 crew for 16 guests - I don't know how they could be more attentive. From the waiters to the cabin boys to all the dive support staff - they go out of their way to spoil you (hot towels after night dives - drying your camera for you, hauling your bc/tank out of the water onto the dive boat). And I go to Indonesia to dive and see the best critters and reefs in the world - the diving is incredible. Toby and Alli were our dive guides - they are as good as they come. I'll post pictures in the other forum area- but they found blue ring octopus, tiger shrimp, rhinopius, halimeda ghost pipefish, boxer crab, coleman and zebra shrimp, frogfish - as well as all the usual Indonesia critters. A wonderpus was the only critter I asked for they weren't able to find this trip.

This was our second trip on Arenui, and hope to do many more. I have been to Indonesia 8 times, 6 of those trips on liveaboards (3 different boats)- and Arenui has been by far the best experience. We were in the below deck cabins - I never saw a single bug the entire trip. The dry dock schedule had been messed up - so the crew was scrambling to finish all the last minute details, as the boat was almost 2 weeks late getting back in their hands to prepare for the next season at Komodo. I am guessing that is why they had a bug issue in some cabins - with a little more prep time, probably would have been fixed before the cruise started. The ladder to the upper deck is steep so each step is taller than normal - you do have to watch your step and use the railings, especially if boat is underway. But this is the fifth different liveaboard I've been on (including Indonesia, American and Caribbean) - and all of them have steep stairways. And the orientation briefing when you get on the boat is thorough - they try hard to arm you with all the facts to be safe and comfortable on the trip.

The entire Arenui is beautifully crafted out of exotic hardwoods - and they made a choice to enlarge the galley size (which is kind of the social hub of the boat; where you eat, work on pictures and cameras, read books, and tell tall tales) at the expense of a separate walkway between the dive boats and the area where you get ready to dive. So you do walk through the galley after diving, and the floor does get wet. However, there is also a 2 head hot shower room right at the top of the gangway to the dive boats - my routine was to go directly to this shower after each dive (there is a wetsuit tub in the shower room). The crew brings you fresh towels while you are in the shower - so we were already clean and dry before we even went through the galley. And the crew is very attentive - they follow the divers through the galley with dry mops, so they do try very hard to minimize slippery floors. The open area in front of the galley where you prepare for the dive (don wetsuits - tank/bc's are already in the dive boats) does have a sloped floor that can be slippery if wet - they have put down anti-slip mats to help to prevent slips - but you do have to be careful. It is just an inherent feature of the boat design.

The dive tenders that shuttle you between the Arenui and the dive sites are somewhat narrow - but I find them to be overall the best design to dive from of any of the liveaboards I have tried. Much easier to get in and out of than inflatables (good ladder, crew takes your tank/bc from you while still in the water) - and twin engines that actually start reliably (not always standard, particularly in 3rd world with their gas).

I guess to summarize - I think overall the Arenui is a great combination of service, comfort, and diving. There are challenges to running a business in Indonesia with the same level of quality as westerners expect - and I think the Arenui overcomes these challenges very well. Gina identified some areas you do need to be aware of - but to me they are a minor detraction from a first class operation. I vote with my pocketbook - and I think the Arenui is a great value, and will be back.
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#9 amarkis

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 08:03 AM

After reading all of these posts it is hard to believe that Gina was on the same boat! Early on I was fortunate to be a guest on this marvelous boat, and immediately thereafter I booked and sailed on two charters, then booked a third! It will be hard to add many more "positives" than have already been made on these posts. But I will add that in each of my trips aboard The Arenui I have brought along a "boat full" of guests. I have been diving liveaboards for 23 years and leading group charters for the last 8 years. Many boats, many places. However, I now focus on Indonesia, the birthplace of the phinisi style boat, like The Arenui. Most liveaboards in these Indonesian waters are of the phinisi style (feels like you're on ancient wooden sailing vessel or a mystic old pirate ship venturing about the Spice Islands, creeks and all. Ya gotta love it!). Many of these "dive boats" do an excellent job of turning the "inside" of the vessel in to a comfortable, even deluxe, living environment. But nobody does it better than The Arenui! Carved wood, Indonesian art, linens and throw pillows...one would think that the entire boat was scrutinized by a professional interior decorator...in fact it was! And match that with superb cruise directors and a dive team led by the best there is, where service by the rest of the crew is unmatched. Add food... scrumptiously prepared and served...all of this is well deserved "hype". Sloped decks, yes. Steep steps, yes. Same with all phinisi style boats. But The Arenui gives special attention to safety whether below or above the water. Decks awash in water with guests in dripping wetsuits will create slippery surfaces no matter what kind of boat you are on, especially in choppy seas or under way. Praises to Gina for her positive comments. Hard to imagine the roaches, but I guess it could happen. In my experience diving on The Arenui is without equal. Every single guest on my last charter signed up for another, on the spot! That says it all!

#10 gina

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 08:04 PM

I have finished my complete review of the Arenui and am posting it here should anyone be interested.

--

The Arenui (pronounced Ar-ren-nooey) is beautiful, a 43 meter/140 foot Indonesian Pinisi (Phinisi) sailing boat touted as a luxury "boutique liveaboard." She has eight passenger cabins--two above-decks and two below--that hold 16 passengers; our 12-day cruise had 13 passengers, leaving Bali for Komodo and diving various sites en route.

There are approximately 20 crew members on board, and all are friendly and efficient. Whether it was donning your gear, rinsing your wetsuit, or bringing you a towel and hot chocolate after a night dive, the crew was very helpful. Sometimes they were a little too helpful, like when your water glass would be cleared away as soon as you turned your head, your wetsuit would be turned right-side-out to dry (when you really wanted it left inside-out to dry better), or they took it upon themselves to dry your camera with compressed air (please do not do that). Two of the stewards double as massage therapists, and let me tell you it is pretty decadent to be able to get a nice (and inexpensive) massage on the sun deck after a dive!

Built about two years ago, a high percentage of reclaimed wood went into building the Arenui, giving her a warm, aged feel. She is appointed with an all-wood interior and local art pieces and as such is easy on the eyes. The main deck has the dive deck on the bow, the dining room/lounge and galley midship, and the four upper cabins aft. The bow and midship areas have slick, sloped wooden decks, typical for this style of ship. While there are a few non-slip mats out on the dive deck and at the entrance to the lounge, they are not fastened to the floor and the mats themselves slip. Moving around the boat, especially while wet or when the boat is rolling, must be done with caution lest your slip and injure yourself. For a week I had a painful bruise on my hand from one of my falls which happened when I was dry but the wet mat slipped out from under me. If this boat was built specifically as a dive boat it makes you wonder why the deck wasn't designed differently--"all other Phinisi boats are built that way" is not a good reason.

Her upper level is a large, spacious outdoor area containing both a sundeck and shady areas. Comfortable padded lounge chairs and benches, plus a fresh water shower for cooling off, make this a lovely place to spend time. Just watch out for the stairs. The staircase leading from the main to the upper deck is steep and slippery, with the top step overhanging about half of the second stop. It can be quite treacherous, and several guests fell and hurt themselves during the course of the cruise. Looking at the staircase from the side you will notice the prefab unit was installed 90 degrees off--what should be the textured treads on the steps are now the rise--which accounts for its awkwardness.

Most cabins are quite roomy and contain ample storage, especially for a liveaboard, and our queen-size bed had a comfortable mattress. But overall I did not feel the cabins lived up to their "boutique" moniker. All cabins have private bathrooms but they are the typical head-plus-shower that leaves the whole bathroom wet after use. A true luxury boat would have a separate stall shower. In addition, the upper cabins have bi-fold doors leading into the bathrooms, rather than an actual door with a closing mechanism. If the boat was experiencing any considerable motion, such as it did on the many nights where it motored to another location, the bi-fold doors would slam open and closed throughout the night. We eventually had to stuff a washcloth in the hinge in order to get some sleep. Our cabin had a few roaches in it and I kept finding small gnats scattered across the daybed. Of course, that was nothing compared to a couple in another cabin who, possibly because of their non-functioning air conditioning unit, had a bad cockroach problem and many times had roaches in their bed and even running across their faces! We were on the first cruise out of drydock, where the bugs came aboard; we found out on the last day that they hadn't time to fumigate before our cruise began but it was going to be fumigated as soon as we left (of course that didn't do the other couple any good). Due to their locations, all of the upper-deck cabins also seem to be plagued with exhaust fumes.

One thing you are not going to do on the Arenui is go hungry. A typical day's schedule is as follows:

7am - continental breakfast
8:00 - dive one
9:30 - full, hot breakfast
11:00 - dive two
1pm - lunch
3:00 - dive three
4:30 - snacks
6:30 - dive four (night)
8:00 - dinner

With this schedule I'd be quite surprised if anyone left the boat without gaining a few pounds! Meals were typically Western-style with some Indonesian influences, and were completely delicious. My guess is that the chefs were restaurant-trained as the food was on par with our restaurants at home (San Francisco: land of amazing food). Even the presentation was top-notch. As a vegetarian I obviously cannot eat the meat and fish on the regular menus, but instead of having me make do with whatever vegetable side dish was available, at each meal the chef prepared a special plate for me. He even went so far as to create vegetarian snacks for all so that I could eat them as well. And just in case you were hungry outside of meal times, there was always a bowl of fruit and some cookies available to munch on. Soft drinks, teas, and instant coffee were also always available and free, while alcoholic beverages and "real" coffee cost extra.

Diving off the Arenui is done from skiffs, with guests and dive guides divided between two different boats. Your gear is waiting for you on the skiffs, and crew handle putting camera gear on board so you can have your hands mostly free to negotiate boarding (divers do carry their masks on board). Four or five divers sit on either side of the skiff, but they are so small that it is difficult to put on your fins without kicking the person across. There is no dedicated space for camera equipment. It would have been nice if the skiffs were large enough that everyone could gear up at once instead of taking turns. Entries were via backward roll, and exits were done up a ladder after doffing your gear which the crew would then haul up on board.

Since most all your gear is kept on the skiff, or in the hold while the boat is underway, you never have access to it during the cruise. Sure, a crew member can run down and grab something if you ask them, but if you are one of those people (like me) who likes to set up their own gear and keep an eye on it during a trip you are out of luck.

But let's get to the real reason we were on the boat - the diving. Our itinerary took us west from Bali, crossing north of Lombok, Moyo, Sangeang, and Banta, then travelling down the far side of Komodo to Rinja. Dive sites were varied with everything from muck to volcanic black sand (warm in places due to underlying thermal activity!) to gorgeous reefs covered in soft coral. Water temperatures at the more northerly sites averaged a pleasant 81F, but the south sides of Komodo and Rinja islands had temps in the 73-75F range; divers were layering up with all the neoprene they brought along to ward off the chill.

The diving itself was spectacular, as Indonesian diving should be. Dives were typically limited to 60-70 minutes, depending on the situation, and we were allowed to dive our own profiles. With few exceptions divers were allowed to go off on their own (as opposed to staying right next to the dive guide); the flip side of this was that if you wanted to take advantage of the incredible spotting skills of the guides, it was your responsibility to find them underwater, as they would not wait for divers. During the course of our cruise we were able to cross off many iconic species from our wish list--pygmy seahorses, frogfish, stargazers, Rhinopias eschmeyeri, etc.--thanks to the aforementioned spotting skills.

Overall, I had very mixed feelings about the Arenui. Let me say here that I am no stranger to liveaboard diving, and have done many trips on some of the most highly-regarded boats in the world, including the Na'ia, Undersea Hunter's Argo, Solmar V, Manthiri, etc.--all top-notch quality boats with superb crews and great food. So when consider my experience on the Arenui I not only compare it with those world-class boats, I also compare it with the boutique hotels I have stayed at. I am also not a person who puts form before function; it doesn't matter how nice something appears if it does not do the job well. With all this in mind I feel the Arenui is a pretty boat, with a quality crew and delicious food, but it falls short of being a true "luxury" boat for the reasons I have described above. I also feel it is a boat for people who are used to the pampering of five-star hotels and to them that is more important than the diving itself. Would I dive with them again? I honestly do not know.

#11 Drew

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 01:27 AM

Thanks for the report Gina. It's always nice to hear feedback about all boats. Sorry about your experience. I know if I paid $500 a night and had roaches running across my face while I slept, I wouldn't be a happy person to say the least.
About the pinisi design, it's always been a personal love/hate thing with its idiosyncracies as a dive boat. I personally think they are not so good as a dedicated dive boat. They are inefficiently slow (6-8 knots cruising), leak water (although some boats have dealt with this issue, ALL pinisi leak somewhere!) and they roll a bit in bigger seas. The side platform isn't conducive to diving from the boat and there are also ventilation issues (humidity buildup in the lower decks etc) etc. The deck slope is also an inherent boat design characteristic and I've been on enough pinisi to see that most boats have had trouble dealing with the traction issues. Black rubber mats makes your feet black while some boats just ask people to be careful :dance: As George (Scorpiofish) has said, the 7 Seas has dealt with it by coating in a texture to improve traction and it works very well.
It's ultimately an old design that all these boat builders have tried to update with engines and luxury amenities, while dealing with the idiosyncracies of the basic design.

Despite its unique characteristics as a boat, there's no denying the history and that certain "je ne sais quoi" feeling about sailing around Indonesia in a wood pinisi. I do it several times a year. The Arenui certainly has its fans, seeing how 3 people signed onto WP just to comment on this thread and add their viewpoints about the boat. I know one of the guides well and his eyes are electron microscopic good! I'm sure Luigi will take care of the people who had issues with their rooms.

Again thanks for the report.

I'm going to move this to the trip report section.

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