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#1 Interceptor121

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 02:41 AM

Just wanted to have some feedback on this picture (has not been edited other than cropping)

I noticed afterwards that the fins could have been straight and the usual little particles in the water

I also notice some minor fogging in the mask which is rather annoying but overall I just wanted to see if this picture says anything or not as I find most of the pictures with divers rather dull so am wondering if it is worth making an effort and 'posing' or should I not bother

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#2 newmanl

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 01:09 PM

I personally find that adding a diver, or divers, to a image creates a lot of artistic opportunity. As you probably know, a diver can act as the subject, or as a secondary subject, and can serve to draw the veiwer into the image to make some sort of connection. People are often attracted to an image of, or with, people as it provides a common frame of reference for the scene.

Having said that, working with models underwater takes a considerable amount of patience, dedication and appreciation for the fact that your model has gone to a lot of effort to even just be in the water and that their contribution to the image is valued in some way. I work with two models at the moment and while the process and results have been rewarding (to me at least), we are constantly working together - in terms of positioning, trim, buoyancy, awareness and hand signals in order to achieve the artistic goal of the image. It's not easy, but I feel it is well worth the effort.

If I may, here's an image I made on the weekend wreck diving with my two regular models. With no prior discussion of the idea, I saw an opportunity, signalled to them and this is what they helped me make.

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As for your image, I like the idea, but unfortunately I find the yellow octo hose and reef stick thing very distracting. I also think the image could be greatly improved by simply having the diver's eyes up and over away from the sponge like they are trying to hear or listen - rather than looking at the camera.

Hope that helps.

Lee

#3 Interceptor121

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 11:50 AM

Lee

Thanks for the feedback. You are right about the equipment. The pointer and the octo do stick out. I believe those can be eliminated with heavy photoshop, but maybe it is better to tidy up in advance. Effectively the picture would have been better taken from the left side of the diver outward compared to the reef.
The eyes is a typical catch which I do have in pretty much all the picture so that needs work.
Funny enough your picture in a low visibility situation makes the divers stand out more on the background, I have tried now playing just a bit with the picture (without cokouring the octo or removing the pointer) and it looks slightly better as the sponge is more in presence still the issue remains with the distractions




I personally find that adding a diver, or divers, to a image creates a lot of artistic opportunity. As you probably know, a diver can act as the subject, or as a secondary subject, and can serve to draw the veiwer into the image to make some sort of connection. People are often attracted to an image of, or with, people as it provides a common frame of reference for the scene.

Having said that, working with models underwater takes a considerable amount of patience, dedication and appreciation for the fact that your model has gone to a lot of effort to even just be in the water and that their contribution to the image is valued in some way. I work with two models at the moment and while the process and results have been rewarding (to me at least), we are constantly working together - in terms of positioning, trim, buoyancy, awareness and hand signals in order to achieve the artistic goal of the image. It's not easy, but I feel it is well worth the effort.

If I may, here's an image I made on the weekend wreck diving with my two regular models. With no prior discussion of the idea, I saw an opportunity, signalled to them and this is what they helped me make.

Posted Image

As for your image, I like the idea, but unfortunately I find the yellow octo hose and reef stick thing very distracting. I also think the image could be greatly improved by simply having the diver's eyes up and over away from the sponge like they are trying to hear or listen - rather than looking at the camera.

Hope that helps.

Lee

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#4 errbrr

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 01:12 AM

Diver shots are tricky...in the right place at the right time they're a fantastic way of putting scale and perspective in a shot. But if your model has dangly gear, crashes into things, breathes too much or blinks at the wrong time, it's hard to rescue the shot in Photoshop. Personally I like divers looking into the lens if they've got an expression on their face (hard to achieve behind mask and regulator) but the eyes can draw the eye of the viewer to the point of interest.

Clean outlines also help the viewer understand what's going on the picture - divers in profile or a close up face make it easy to see what's going on. Maybe your shot could be improved by changing the outline of the diver, and trying for a smile with the eyes?