Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

St Croix Bird Rescue


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 diver dave1

diver dave1

    Great White

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 913 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:chess, u/w photography

Posted 04 October 2011 - 03:17 AM

Our first day at the west end of St Croix presented us with some decent diving but that was the sideline of the day.
What appeared to be a juvenile brown booby (I am no bird expert) had fish hooks and fishing line wrapped/stuck in places that prevented flying more than a few feet. When we went off to dive, it was swimming, trying to fly and failing in the bay near the pier.
When we returned to dock, it was on the dock, hanging around the boat area. One woman was able to get hold of the long fishing line dragging behind. Then it was a team effort. One put on gloves and gently held the birds bill and body still. Another went to the dive shop and got tools. The 4 of us worked together to hold bird wing, tail, etc to cut the 3 hooks - 2 in the wing, one in the mouth, cut the steel leader and strings.
The hardest was a wing hook. In far enough the best way was to press it on through and pull it out. Painful for the bird. Hard to inflict the pain but necessary. Was glad we had a retired NYC Fireman present for the cutting work. He was excellent at it. The hooks were quite thick for catching larger ocean prey and rather hard to cut.

When finished, we stepped back and the bird shook a bit then stood there for a time. Perhaps gaining some composure from it all.
The highlight of the trip was watching it finally just fly away.

Still diving to do this week and a fiber optic snoot to start to learn.
None of that will matter to any wildlife more than the bird rescue.
Wondering if the bird was smart enough to know humans were its only chance to survival. I'll never know for certain.

Makes us glad we picked here for the trip.

Did not think of it at the time. Wish I had taken a photo of the bird before it flew off.
Maybe it will be near the dock again this week.

dave

Nauticam D7000, Inon Z-240's, 60 micro, 105 micro, Tokina 10-17

www.shiningseastudio.com


#2 cor

cor

    The Hacker

  • Admin
  • 1993 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Amsterdam, Netherlands

Posted 04 October 2011 - 12:09 PM

8 more weeks until i head back to St Croix for a few months.. cant wait.
Cor Bosman - Nikon D2X Subal ND2 - Nikon D7000 Subal ND7000
website | tripreports/journal | facebook | wetpixel map | twitter


#3 diver dave1

diver dave1

    Great White

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 913 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:chess, u/w photography

Posted 04 October 2011 - 01:28 PM

Amazingly, the bird flew out to see us today. Landed on the dive boat bow once we stopped at our first mooring. Flew up, landed on the front. Seemed to be saying Hello. Then flew off again. Hard to be absolutely positive it was the same bird but it certainly looked like it. Its tail feathers is still a bit imperfect from the ordeal and the bird on the boat had that same pattern.

Its a smaller, open bow boat so it was rather close to us when it arrived.

dave

Nauticam D7000, Inon Z-240's, 60 micro, 105 micro, Tokina 10-17

www.shiningseastudio.com


#4 diver dave1

diver dave1

    Great White

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 913 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:chess, u/w photography

Posted 05 October 2011 - 02:37 AM

Today's update.
Got to watch, help a baby turtle. He crawled out of the sand nest by the cottage and started his march to the sea. Was a hoot to watch it. He got flipped going over a rock and could not get off his back. Another observer gave him a flip back and the march continued until he made it past the small breaking waves.

Perhaps my children will come see that turtle here someday.

We were wishing the Dolphin we saw swimming by the beach would come join us for diving but no such luck.
But a nice orange frogfish under the pier during our night dive made up for it.

Nauticam D7000, Inon Z-240's, 60 micro, 105 micro, Tokina 10-17

www.shiningseastudio.com


#5 PatW

PatW

    Hermit Crab

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Longwood, Florida

Posted 20 March 2012 - 10:02 AM

I am glad you took the time to save the bird. You are right, treating an injured animal is usually a multiperson job. The animal is scared and needs to be held securely to keep it from hurting either itself or others.



Our first day at the west end of St Croix presented us with some decent diving but that was the sideline of the day.
What appeared to be a juvenile brown booby (I am no bird expert) had fish hooks and fishing line wrapped/stuck in places that prevented flying more than a few feet. When we went off to dive, it was swimming, trying to fly and failing in the bay near the pier.
When we returned to dock, it was on the dock, hanging around the boat area. One woman was able to get hold of the long fishing line dragging behind. Then it was a team effort. One put on gloves and gently held the birds bill and body still. Another went to the dive shop and got tools. The 4 of us worked together to hold bird wing, tail, etc to cut the 3 hooks - 2 in the wing, one in the mouth, cut the steel leader and strings.
The hardest was a wing hook. In far enough the best way was to press it on through and pull it out. Painful for the bird. Hard to inflict the pain but necessary. Was glad we had a retired NYC Fireman present for the cutting work. He was excellent at it. The hooks were quite thick for catching larger ocean prey and rather hard to cut.

When finished, we stepped back and the bird shook a bit then stood there for a time. Perhaps gaining some composure from it all.
The highlight of the trip was watching it finally just fly away.

Still diving to do this week and a fiber optic snoot to start to learn.
None of that will matter to any wildlife more than the bird rescue.
Wondering if the bird was smart enough to know humans were its only chance to survival. I'll never know for certain.

Makes us glad we picked here for the trip.

Did not think of it at the time. Wish I had taken a photo of the bird before it flew off.
Maybe it will be near the dock again this week.

dave