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Lytro: Focus on the future


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#1 ScubaSapiens

ScubaSapiens

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 07:02 AM

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This week, the revolutionary Lytro camera starts shipping in the U.S. It offers mindboggling re-focusing possibilities and a whole new take on photography. Will it also lead to a re-think of underwater photography?

With the Lytro camera, you don't have to worry about getting your focus right - you can re-focus the image as many times as you like after you have shot it! Not only does this offer a whole new way of shooting images - it challenges the concept of photography. The Lytro is called a light-field camera, and is hailed as one of the greatest revolutions in photography and camera technology.

It works by capturing the color, intensity and direction of light on a modified sensor. Instead of just capturing a single plane of light like a traditional camera does, the Lytro captures the entire light field, which is all the light travelling in every direction in every point in space. Lytro doesn't even classify its camera by the familiar megapixel measure. Instead, the company says their "living images" has a resolution of 11 megarays - in other words, it can capture 11 million light rays.

In the trenches defending old-school photography

In a recent post on Wetpixel called Time For A Major Philosophy Change?, I (and many others) commented on Alex Mustard's questions and thoughts about how new technology impacts photography. I realized I was quite the traditionalist, and felt I had to defend traditional photography in the sense that getting it all right in the camera before shooting the image was the superior way of doing things.

This somehow made me feel unconfortable, and I was annoyed and surprised that the notion of doing things differently made me dig trenches. I wanted to embrace the new ideas, but felt like I couldn't - it was in way like dismissing all my knowledge and admitting it was not good enough. But then I realized how I've gotten to where I am today - by learning new things.

Shouldn't new technology propel me forward instead of making me feel like I'm part of the Jurassic Park lizard line-up?

Posting the whole thing here might prove a little long, so please continue reading on Scubapixel

Edited by ScubaSapiens, 08 March 2012 - 07:10 AM.

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