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D800e will Moire be a problem underwater?


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#1 jgrjr777

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 05:34 AM

Here is a link to an article on the choice between a D800 or D800e.

http://www.luminous-..._or_d800e.shtml

My question is this. While most most landscape photographers do not seem concerned about moire on the new D800e. What about us UW photographers? We shoot in a natural environment but many times there are repeating patterns. Fish scales, corals ect... Will we see more of a problem?

There are many pros shooting topside with cameras that have no AA filter, almost none of these cameras make it UW. There are very few housed medium format cameras. It is very different to shoot landscapes topside with no repeating patterns or fashion topside with a lot of man made repeating patterns.

I just wanted to know what more experienced people think? Do we have enough repeating patterns to have a moire problem?

I am a Canon shooter but the D800e is very interesting. I will wait to see all the tests or samples.

#2 Paul Kay

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 06:34 AM

I've been shooting topsides (10s of 000s of pix) with an M8 and now an M9 neither of which have an AA filter. I very, very rarely see moire and generally when/if I do its only on a distinctly man made pattern (architecture and clothing) so I very much doubt that it will be a significant problem underwater for natural history subjects.
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#3 davichin

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:05 AM

I think that the water column and the port glass will also help against moire (they "blur" the image). Also, UWP usually requires high f-stops (16-22...) causing diffraction which also helps against moire (as well as IQ...). We will see...
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#4 Drew

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:54 AM

You can actually remove the AA filter from your Canon. I did it for my old 1Ds II for fun and there was visible improvement in resolution but nothing to scream about. It's cheaper than buying a new system. I believe Craig Jones started a thread about it a few years ago.

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#5 Paul Kay

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 10:13 AM

I think that the water column and the port glass will also help against moire (they "blur" the image).

No moire in the corners of domes then :D . But seriously I don't think that this is the case or all underwater images would look soft.....
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#6 davichin

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 11:50 AM

No moire in the corners of domes then :D .

:D

But seriously I don't think that this is the case or all underwater images would look soft.....


Well, pictures above water donīt look soft and most of them are taken with AA "blurring" filters...Just think of any UW picture taken from a little too long distance where detail is always lost etc... In any case, I agree with you on the non-moire side. Looking forward to see a review...
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