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Video tips for D7000


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#1 Longimanus1975

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 12:18 AM

Hi

I would like to get peoples tips on doing video on a D7000. I have had a quick go above water and found it quite poor.

If anyone has any tips on what setting to start with it would be much appreciated, I just want to speed up my learning curve really, so that when I get in the water I am at least ready to give it a serious go.

Any videos that have been shot with a D7000 underwater would also be great, post me some links so that I can view them

cheers

#2 Drew

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 02:28 AM

Start here:

http://wetpixel.com/...highlite= D7000

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#3 Rainer

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:12 AM

Hi

I would like to get peoples tips on doing video on a D7000. I have had a quick go above water and found it quite poor.

If anyone has any tips on what setting to start with it would be much appreciated, I just want to speed up my learning curve really, so that when I get in the water I am at least ready to give it a serious go.

Any videos that have been shot with a D7000 underwater would also be great, post me some links so that I can view them

cheers



Definitely look through the past threads. I've only shot a few videos on ours underwater, but here are some things I've learned / do:

(1) 1080p, 24 FPS, max quality, 1/50, f/3.5-5.6 (unless in VERY bright light), ISO 100-800 (lower is better)
(2) Bring video lights (you can never have too much)
(3) White balance as you change depth (I have a buddy hold open his wetnotes and balance off those)
(4) Slow pans are best
(5) Shoot in manual (shutter should never change, adjust aperture as little as possible simply since it's a pain--requires leaving LV, up ISO to compensate for darkness with depth--again, this assumes you're already shooting pretty wide open)
(6) As for focus, if you have a really wide angle lens (e.g. Tokina 10-17mm), you can basically pre-focus on something a couple feet away, and then leave it alone (this will get you basically 2/3'-infinity). Topside, I'll manually focus as well. I'll also use a variable ND filter so I don't have to mess with closing down the aperture in bright light. I've rarely had reason to complain about too much light underwater. :)

Here's a video I shot after only a couple of tries that I'm pretty happy with:

[vimeohd]36954193[/vimeohd]

#4 Longimanus1975

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:49 AM

Hi, many thanks for this info, this is great!

I may come back to you with further info once I have a play tonight!

#5 Longimanus1975

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:17 AM

Just watched the video as I couldn't at work, nice work there, gives me some confidence now.

Can I ask what lens you used?

#6 Rainer

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 11:44 AM

Just watched the video as I couldn't at work, nice work there, gives me some confidence now.

Can I ask what lens you used?


Thanks. This was with the Tokina 10-17mm. A mix shot at 10mm and 17mm.

Good luck with all this!