Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Sun burst shot


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 petern

petern

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 45 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Perth Western Australia
  • Interests:I like taking images that are hopefully different.

Posted 09 May 2012 - 09:17 PM

Hi All
I am after some advice regarding sun burst shot. I use a D90 and was wondering if anyone with a similar set up has has great results with the sun at depth. I usually shoot on manual F11 as an average, 80th >100th, @ 200asa, strobes on 1/4 and 1/16.
I know low sunlight position works well but have problems with the overhead positions. Any samples with setting appreciated.
Thanks

Attached Images

  • DSC_0127_small.jpg


#2 Alastair

Alastair

    Sting Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brisbane, Australia

Posted 10 May 2012 - 10:08 PM

i use the lower iso settings to compensate for the 1/200 flash sync speed and that seems to help. or postion it behind something!!
Alastair

Nikon D90 Aquatica housing, nikkor 60mm, ,105VR mm, 18-70mm, 17-55mm, 10.5mm FE, 15mm FE, 10-20mm.
Inon strobes, TLC arms.

www.mcgregorUW.smugmug.com

#3 diver dave1

diver dave1

    Great White

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:chess, u/w photography

Posted 11 May 2012 - 11:47 AM

From what I believe and have seen, the D90 shows its limits with sunbursts. I do not have great examples to show but here are a few.
Wish I had better one's to share but my experience with this type of photo is limited.

The D90 tends to have color bands, which can be seen in both of my photo's and yours well. Readings suggest the D7000 is far better at this type of photo.

Both of these were at 120 ft of clear water, 1/200, F9 using two Z240's in manual set at f8 on the dial.

Sunburst at depth

Covered sunburst

Is this any help?

Dave

Nauticam D7000, Inon Z-240's, 60 micro, 105 micro, Tokina 10-17

www.shiningseastudio.com


#4 petern

petern

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 45 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Perth Western Australia
  • Interests:I like taking images that are hopefully different.

Posted 11 May 2012 - 09:44 PM

Thanks guys, this is going to be a case of just sitting on the bottom and just shooting, I have heard that the bit depth on models like D7000 are the reason that they produce more define light rays and good colour definition through the water to the light source. The D 90 seems to handle low sun position much better and in shallow water as would be expected. I don't think I am going to rush out and upgrade just yet.

Attached Images

  • DSC_0263.jpg


#5 MortenHansen

MortenHansen

    Sting Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia

Posted 19 May 2012 - 03:15 PM

Hi there Peter,

Even though the D90 is maybe not as good as say, a D7000 for capturing sunbursts, I am sure that you can do a thing or two to improve the sunbursts.
I must also say that I am sure that there are people on this forum with a lot more knowledge on this topic than me!

I am finding it hard to capture nice sunbursts with my EOS7D if I do not follow the guide-lines below:

1. try to hide the sun, fully or partially, behind your model, a nice coral, boat, turtle, etc.
2. Use a high shutter-speed (180-250), a low ISO, and a low aperture (underexpose the blue a stop or three and illuminate the foreground with your flash)
3. Shoot sunbursts on days when surface conditions are calm, choppy waters seem to spread out the beams of light

I am sure that you can create some great sunbursts with your D90, i've made a few "decent" ones with my G11 even, its all about the position of the sun and your exposure :lol:


Have fun- Morten.

#6 Aussiebyron

Aussiebyron

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 595 posts

Posted 21 May 2012 - 04:47 AM

I was shooting the Nikon D90 before I moved onto the D7000. I find the D7000 alot better at capturing sunbursts mainly due to its flash sync of 1/320th with my hard wired Ikelite DS161 strobes shot in manual.

The Nikon D90 can obtain decent sunbursts but there a many viables which need to be taken in mind as its not just a matter of camera settings. I agree with Morten that low ISO (Lo 1 on the Nikon d90) and high shutter speed. It also has alot to do with what your trying to achieve in the shot. Are you just after the sunburst or are you after the sunburst as a secondary importance to a subject like a model or animal (ray,shark, turtle etc etc) as this also influences your settings.

As Morten stated sun position, surface conditions play and important role but also one of the most important factors is depth and water clarity. Most of the successful sun burst I have have taken have been in shallow clear water with still surface conditions. I beleive once you gain greater depth that you will end up with more of a sun ball glow than a sun burst as the water has some form of colour (unless gin clear) which acts as a filter/diffuser to softens the light. The deeper you go the more is effect comes into play. It also the same if shooting on a cloudy day as the clouds themselves soften the light and act as a diffuser similar to whats on your strobes.

My suggestion for you to achieve high impact sun rays is to shoot as shallow as your subject allows, pick the day were the surface conditions are calm and the water clarity is high. Lowest ISO on your camera (lo 1 on the Nikon D90), fast shutter speed and a f stop relative to what effect your trying to achieve.

If your diving deeper water you can still use the effect of the sun for a warm ball feeling as a background to your subject by positioning the subject within that sun ball.



Here are some examples:
Posted Image
Nikon D90 Tokina 10-17mm @ 10mm. ISO LO1, f10, 1/200th

Posted Image
Nikon D90 Tokina 10-17mm @ 10mm. ISO LO1, f10, 1/200th

Posted Image
Using the subject to cover part of the sunburst.
Nikon D90 Tokina 10-17mm @ 10mm. ISO LO1, f10, 1/200th

Posted Image
Using the Sun ball at depth. Nikon D90 Tokina 10-17mm (@10mm) Ikelite DS125's. ISOLO1 (100) f13, 1/200th

Hope this helps.

Regards Mark
Nikon D7000 with Aquatica housing called "Deedee", Tokina 10-17,Nikkor 60mm, Nikkor 105mm, Sigma 17-70, Ikelite DS161

http://www.flickr.co...s/22898788@N04/

#7 george74

george74

    Brine Shrimp

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 25 June 2012 - 06:05 AM

As for me, expose for the sky. This will make your overall image underexposed, but allow the sun to show as a star-like form instead of one big hazy, white ball.

#8 Panda

Panda

    Sting Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 265 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Geelong, Australia
  • Interests:Split levels, timelapse, temperate critters.

Posted 25 June 2012 - 12:55 PM

Posted Image

Shooting RAW makes a big difference and reducing exposure. You have plenty of room to move with your exposure settings. This was shot with a D80 down at 20m or so.

anewton.net - UW blog - KAP blog
Victoria Australia. Nikon D7000, Lumix LX3. Ikelite. Inon. GoPro 2


#9 spencerjb22

spencerjb22

    Wolf Eel

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 114 posts

Posted 29 June 2012 - 05:39 AM

I can get 1/250 shutter speed with my D90. I'm shooting manual, with 2 x s+s strobes via electronic syncs.

#10 stewsmith

stewsmith

    Giant Squid

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1586 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:southampton and Sinai
  • Interests:World travel
    diving
    photography
    winding Drew up

Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:00 PM

Practice and bracket. Shoot in Raw

Canon 5D MK2 - Sea and Sea housed - 17-40L 100mm - Sigma 15mm FE - twin YS250 pro's and gadgets galore

 

http://www.euphoticzoneimaging.com