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wired sea creature


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#1 ChrigelKarrer

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 08:08 AM

Well, a bit deep to use our gear.....
Wired Sea Creature
Man, how much i would love to dive down there!

Chris

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#2 JKrumsick

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 08:14 AM

I thought it was a plastic bag at first. Really strange... Never seen anything like it.

#3 ChrigelKarrer

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 08:27 AM

Yeah me too,
but it has organs and a anus/mouth/breathing/jet tube.
Very strange is also the honeycomb pattern on the "foil"

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#4 Leslie

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 11:25 AM

Jelly, Deepstaria enigmatica. There was a nice blog post about it on Deep Sea News, May 9, explaining the various body parts & history - http://deepseanews.com/
and pics of one in normal position on the facebook jelly watch page -
https://www.facebook...1...e=1

Incidentally, if you don't know it already, Deep Sea News is a fantastic marine biology blog. Even when I'm overwhelmed by stuff & drop everything else I still check it on a daily basis. Enjoy!

#5 ChrigelKarrer

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 12:18 PM

Wowww Leslie,
i am deeply impressed of your knowledge!
I posted the video here to show it to a broad audience and you gave us the answer 3 hours later...
I never expected that somebody will know what it is.
Thank you so much!
Chris

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#6 Leslie

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 02:22 PM

I only know it because I read Deep Sea News, otherwise I would have been as clueless as a duck!

#7 pointy

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 04:49 AM

Does anyone know the size of that specimen in the video (rough estimat)? How big could they get, and what size prey do they take. Is that known or is there any way to make an educated guess?

John McCracken

#8 Leslie

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 08:38 AM

The first one Deepstaria enigmatica was taken at 723 m in the San Diego Trough; it was about 60 cm across. You can read the original description at http://sabella.mba.ac.uk/2457/

#9 JimSwims

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 01:31 AM

Wow, that is enigmatic indeed!

Chris your not suggesting it's all done with wires are you? :D

Cheers,
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#10 pointy

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 06:34 AM

Thanks Leslie, for putting it to scale. I was a bit disappointed to hear it was only 60 cm across rather than 10 meters, but we don't know what other creatures lurk down there.

John McCracken

The first one Deepstaria enigmatica was taken at 723 m in the San Diego Trough; it was about 60 cm across. You can read the original description at http://sabella.mba.ac.uk/2457/



#11 yuesir

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Posted 16 May 2012 - 11:43 PM

thought it was a plastic bag at first ! that's really strange !

#12 Leslie

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 07:11 AM

Steve Haddock, jelly expert at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute has revised the identification - it's the other species of Deepstaria, D. reticulum. He's posted this video with great images of both species plus other deep sea jellies.

Check out some of the other deep sea videos on the MBARI youtube site as well. Great stuff!