Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Help identifying two fish from Anilao, Philippines


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 jrosenf

jrosenf

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 31 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 04 June 2012 - 07:59 PM

Could any of you fish folks please help me identify a couple of fish I photographed on a recent trip to Anilao. Both were fairly small, in the neighborhood of 2 or 3 inches. Both were found at a depth of approximately 25 ft, the first on a day dive and the second on a night dive.

Thanks!

Posted Image

Posted Image

#2 JimSwims

JimSwims

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 659 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mornington Peninsula, Australia.

Posted 04 June 2012 - 11:32 PM

First looks like some type of Coralgoby and it's gravid.

Second appears to be a juvenile Jawfish, uncharacteristically exposed.

Cheers,
Jim.

My photostream on Flickr My gallery on Redbubble

D90 in Nexus; 60mm, Woody's Diopter, 105mm, SubSee +5 & +10 magnifiers, 10-17mm, Kenko 1.4 TC, 10-24mm, 18-55mm & Inon Z240 strobes.


#3 JimG

JimG

    Sting Ray

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 256 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yorkshire, UK
  • Interests:Photography - underwater and avian, natural history

Posted 05 June 2012 - 12:15 AM

I think the first one is Trimma stobbsi - the Yellowhead Goby. Agree it looks pregnant. Saw some for the first time a couple of weeks ago in Lembeh.

Jim Greenfield - Canon 5D Mark 3/Aquatica
My Web Site


#4 jrosenf

jrosenf

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 31 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 05 June 2012 - 06:28 AM

Thanks!

#5 Nick Hope

Nick Hope

    Sperm Whale

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1966 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Thailand

Posted 05 June 2012 - 08:32 PM

I'm thinking the first one may be Lubricogobius exiguus. For Trimma stobbsi I'd expect the "ear spot" to be more distinct, and the rear body to be less yellow.

#6 rickcavanaugh

rickcavanaugh

    Triggerfish

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 38 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA, Oak Ridge, NC

Posted 14 June 2012 - 04:02 PM

First one is a yellow clown goby Gobiodon okinawae

Common aquarium fish

http://www.fishchann...own-goby-2.aspx
www.scubatripreview.com
www.rickcavanaugh.com

#7 Glasseye Snapper

Glasseye Snapper

    Tiger Shark

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 558 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Edmonton, Canada
  • Interests:Fish ID & behaviour and photos thereof

Posted 18 July 2012 - 08:04 PM

On my trip to Anilao last June I found the same yellow goby twice on a muck dive ("coconut muck", on the other side of the strait across from the Mainit site) in an area without coral, just rubble and sand. I could not find a good ID in Reef Fish Identification - Tropical Pacific. Gobiodon okinawae looked closest but I have only found gobiodons in or on corals. The new Reef Fishes of the East Indies book however has an image for Lubricogobius ornatus which is a very good match and its habitat is described as "silt and rubble bottoms (the picture was taken in Lembeh strait on an apparent muck dive). The book has no entry for Lubricogobius exiguus but according to fishbase they seem to be quite similar but the latter is described as having "dorsal and ventral edges of caudal peduncle strongly keeled" whereas L. ornatus is not keeled. I don't see a keel on your image and don't remember seeing it on the ones I found. However, in terms of color L. exiguus may be a better fit, but colors are often variable, morphology less so. so my best guess is L. ornatus.

Bart
Olympus OM-D EM5/Nauticam, 12-50mm & 60mm macro
Sea&Sea 110a, iTorch, GoPro3 BE

#8 Nick Hope

Nick Hope

    Sperm Whale

  • Industry
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1966 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Thailand

Posted 01 October 2013 - 10:25 PM

What should "strong keels on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the caudal peduncle" look like? The caudal peduncle on the L. exiguus pic on fishbase looks just like the L. ornatus pics on fishbase and in the East Indies book.

 

For me, the lack of "pale blue lines radiating from eye and one descending from nape" pushes the ID towards L. exiguus, unless I'm missing something regarding the caudal peduncle keels. If it really is L. ornatus, and the East Indies book pic is correct, then there are likely a lot of mis-IDs out there on the net, especially from Lembeh.


Edited by Nick Hope, 01 October 2013 - 10:27 PM.