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Remote cameras with power feed...


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#1 davichin

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 03:56 AM

Hello all,

I am not into video at all but, for a job at my company I have the need of using a big crane with a demolition tool underwater (for a reinforced concrete caisson removal). I am searching for solutions on how to attach a camera and housing to the tool, feed it electrically (it has to be working some 12 hours straight...), and have a signal cord to the crane´s cabin (where I would install a screen for the driver) some 100-150 meters long. I think that even a WA HD GO PRO would do but I don´t know how to feed it electrically. I also thought of a DSLR with Seacam´s remote vision (or a normal screen) but I face the same electrical feed problem... Is there any idea that you would suggest?

Thank you very much!
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#2 sjspeck

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 04:12 AM

Hello all,

I am not into video at all but, for a job at my company I have the need of using a big crane with a demolition tool underwater (for a reinforced concrete caisson removal). I am searching for solutions on how to attach a camera and housing to the tool, feed it electrically (it has to be working some 12 hours straight...), and have a signal cord to the crane´s cabin (where I would install a screen for the driver) some 100-150 meters long. I think that even a WA HD GO PRO would do but I don´t know how to feed it electrically. I also thought of a DSLR with Seacam´s remote vision (or a normal screen) but I face the same electrical feed problem... Is there any idea that you would suggest?

Thank you very much!

I think you'd need something a whole magnitude better than a GoPro - something that can take a beating based on the shock it will be subjected to. Is the concrete 100M deep? It will be dark and under a lot of pressure also so I don't think any consumer grade housing will stand up to that for very long. Plus if you mount the camera close enough so it's actually useful for the operator it will likely get hit by debris occasionally. You're also going to need a lot of light. Once you start tearing up concrete u/w it's going to create a tremendous amount of silt and clouds of dust/debris.

Maybe something like this: http://rosys.com/oce...c/mantis-ocean/
Posted Image

Or something from here: http://www.sea-viewd...rinecameras.htm You might also consider something 3D so the operator has a better perspective on what he's doing. http://www.sea-viewd...vdsp3dhires.htm

google remote underwater video camera for more options.

Maybe talk to someone who does similar work to see what they recommend. You should be talking to commercial salvors or oil-rig inspectors - not u/w videographers whose only concern is keeping their camera dry.

Who are you renting (I assume) the demolition rig from? Don't they already have something they're using on it? Their operator must need to see what he's doing somehow...

Edited by sjspeck, 12 June 2012 - 05:08 AM.


#3 davichin

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 05:36 AM

I think you'd need something a whole magnitude better than a GoPro - something that can take a beating based on the shock it will be subjected to. Is the concrete 100M deep? It will be dark and under a lot of pressure also so I don't think any consumer grade housing will stand up to that for very long. Plus if you mount the camera close enough so it's actually useful for the operator it will likely get hit by debris occasionally. You're also going to need a lot of light. Once you start tearing up concrete u/w it's going to create a tremendous amount of silt and clouds of dust/debris.

Maybe something like this: http://rosys.com/oce...c/mantis-ocean/
Posted Image

Or something from here: http://www.sea-viewd...rinecameras.htm You might also consider something 3D so the operator has a better perspective on what he's doing. http://www.sea-viewd...vdsp3dhires.htm

Whatever you get I'd also add some sort of replaceable hardened shield in front of the lens.

Google this for thousands of other industrial options: underwater remote video camera.

Maybe talk to someone who does similar work to see what they recommend.

No offense but you seem to be out of your league by even asking about it here. You should be talking to commercial salvors or oil-rig inspectors. Who are you renting (I assume) the demolition rig from? Don't they already have something they're using on it? Their operator must need to see what he's doing somehow...


Thank you very much for taking your time! and, of course, no offense at all. Here is some more information:

My company subcontracted this work to a crane and demolition specialist and they are having problems with their video equipment (the operators are not good at fixing it and it is not a good enough equipment from my point of view...and not reliable at all...). The work´s max depth is 28m, but the furthest part is around 60m (that is why I stimated a longer cord) in clean (it is even in a constant mild current area) waters so even when breaking concrete the water clears quickly. After having to stop many times and receiving delay claims from my part they asked us for help in the video department, so that is why I put the question here (I also asked our technical department in Madrid which will try to find dedicated companies). It does not make sense to me that they have such a subpar video equipment when a non working day costs them more than a complete video set...

I think that with the available light (it is really clear here in the Canary islands at that depth...) any HD (not even a HD...) camera should deliver a more than enough good image for the job and gopros or the like could be used as disposable cameras should they break, got hit, tangled in the steel bars... and for the price it is worth at least a try...
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#4 JohnE

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 06:07 AM

If you can live with 100 feet max, Gates has a POV camera / housing:

http://www.gateshous...10-pov-housing/

Contact us here if you'd like to discuss further: http://www.gateshous.../contact-us.php

Cheers,

John

#5 ErolE

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 06:24 AM

Hi agree that you ll need to have something more robust than a consumer grade housing. If you are using a demolition tool you d expect some significant shock waves.

In addition you need to look at the cabling a consumer coax and power cable will not stand up to the abrasion from movement and current and you ll be getting constant cable issues.

Based on my experience (15 years of putting electronic sensor underwater in commercial/science settings) you d be shooting yourself in the foot to try and adapt a consumer housing, particularly if downtime costs are high.

Rather than spend money why not rent a suitable unit?

Have a look here
http://www.seatronic...o-inspection-18
http://ashtead-techn...y.com/offshore/

Just my two cents :) Good luck

Erol
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#6 ErolE

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 07:00 AM

Oh and make sure you find a unit that is super low light. Once you get into demolition and you have alot of sediment you don t want to be relying on a lighting rig as the backscatter will make it impossible to see.

Either that or get an acoustic solution. They do use the Reson multi-beams to to guide excavation equipment in high sediment environments, although there will be more expensive.
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#7 davichin

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Posted 12 June 2012 - 07:16 AM

Thank you very much for your help, all of those seem to be up to the job.
We have a Sonar 3D Echoscope http://www.codaoctop...gallery/videos/ that we used in a different work (but with the same subcontractor) in the north west of mainland Spain, but we are not sure if it will work here (that work was the positioning of several thousands of 50 ton concrete blocks) because of the demolition nature...
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